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Stauffer pondering Sodexho café

A few short months after the first ground is broken for the Queen’s Centre, students might be treated to a new service across the street.

Stauffer Library may become home to one of campus food operator Sodexho’s trendier brands—Jazzman’s Café—with the installation of an upscale coffee outlet not seen anywhere else on campus.Continue...

‘Fabulous’ gay grads to wed on TV

When Mischa Bartkow, Comm ’03, went to party it up at Alfie’s four years ago, he never expected the student constable inspecting his ID would be the man he would one day marry on a reality TV show.
Bartkow and Dan Dumsha, ConEd ’03, told the Journal they have been inseparable since then. Engaged for only a week, they finally wed in March on the Global TV program My Fabulous Gay Wedding . The episode will air July 6.Continue...

Ex-AMS prez holds court at OUSA

A former AMS President has been appointed executive director of the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance (OUSA).

Scott Courtice, ArtSci ’02, headed the AMS in 2001-2002.

Students voted in favour of the AMS rejoining the external student lobby group in last year’s winter referendum. Queen’s, a founding member, withdrew in 1995.Continue...

Student dies in Kingston car crash

Greg Hulse, ArtSci ’08, may have chosen to live in Watts Hall for his first year of university, but his family in nearby Hartington was never far from his mind. Back home in Hartington for the summer, Greg commuted to Kingston for his job as a Fort Henry guard. As he was driving home from work last Friday on County Road 38, his northbound Honda crossed the centre line and hit a southbound vehicle head-on. Greg died at the scene. He was 19 years old.Continue...

Mending fences in the Ghetto

After more than six months of research, public consultation and meetings, the Principal’s Task Force on Community Relations has released 13 recommendations to address city-student tensions that came to a head last fall and winter.

The report states the recommendations are “intended to create the conditions for change.”Continue...

Deane appointed VP (Academic)

The size and quality of classes will be one of incoming VP (Academic) Patrick Deane’s top priorities when he begins his new job at the University on July 1.

Deane, currently the vice-president (academic) and provost at the University of Winnipeg will be replacing VP (Academic) Suzanne Fortier.Continue...

Ontario budget highlights

The Ontario government’s $6.2 billion injection into post-secondary education revealed in the May 11 budget will end a period of difficult financial constraints for the University, said VP (Academic) Suzanne Fortier.Continue...

International students seek jobs off-campus

When Kim Wiegand, ArtSci ’07, arrived in Kingston from Minnesota in 2003, the University admissions office told her that her chances of finding work off-campus were next to none, simply because she was an international student. With on-campus employment as her only money-making option, Wiegand applied for a position at the Common Ground during her first year. She said she quickly realized jobs at the University are difficult to secure.Continue...

Computer programmer wins big

It’s not often a student is awarded $13,000 U.S. for seven hours of work.

Gary Linscott, ArtSci ’05, took home the cash as the top prize winner in the 2005 TopCoder Collegiate Challenge. The competition was hosted by TopCoder, Inc., an American software and programming company.Continue...

TAPS party threatens liquor licence

To avoid jeopardizing the University liquor licence, The AMS Pub Services (TAPS) shut its doors for 20 days at the end of winter term after potential violations occurred during its year-end staff party at Alfie’s.Continue...

Student dies in climbing accident

On April 27, however, Nicholas Beaulieu set out to climb the northeast corner of Dupuis Hall. He made it almost to the top of the building before losing his footing and falling three stories, landing first on the hood of a University van and then on the pavement. He died at Kingston General Hospital two days later at the age of 19.Continue...

Controversy over Union Street plans

The future of The Grad Club was called into question May 5 at a public information meeting held by the Union Street Improvement Project.

Both preliminary design concepts proposed called for the destruction of all or part of the campus hangout, which is located at the northwest corner of Barrie and Union streets.Continue...

Walk for Life raises AIDS awareness

Anticipation, enthusiasm and determination characterized the mood of a group of Queen’s students who marched alongside community members in the annual AIDS Walk for Life on Sunday.

Members of the Queen’s Aids Awareness Committee participated in the walk, which raised money for people living with HIV or AIDS in the Kingston community.

According to HIV/AIDS Regional Services in Kingston, an estimated 56,000 Canadians are currently living with either the HIV virus or AIDS.Continue...

Day Care celebrates 35 years

A tree planting ceremony and corn roast kicked off the Queen’s Day Care Centre’s 35th anniversary celebrations last Friday.

Excited children, parents, volunteers and day care staff attended the event, which celebrated the rich history of the organization.

The centre was unofficially founded in 1969 when student parents took turns minding one another’s children during their classes. Thirty-five years later, the cooperative system has evolved into a two-building facility on Union Street, which cares for more than 150 children each week.Continue...

Club Profile: Queen’s Students for Literacy

While the average student might neglect their 150 pages of assigned readings because of laziness, there are individuals who avoid reading because of a more serious problem—they simply don’t know how.

Queen’s Students for Literacy (QSL) is a non-profit, charitable, student-run organization that actively promotes literacy and a love of learning throughout Kingston.Continue...

Males still outnumber females in post-graduate medicine

There are approximately 20 per cent more males than females enrolled in post-graduate programs at the School of Medicine. Despite these numbers, the medical profession and academic world have undergone changes in the last few years that may make medical programs more attractive and accessible to females.
A recent article published in the the Times Higher Education Supplement quoted a member of the British Medical Association’s Academic Staff Committee as saying women are underrepresented in senior academic positions in medicine.Continue...

Nursing captures the faculty

After initial controversy, the Faculty of Nursing was declared victorious in the second annual game of Capture the Faculty, despite being the smallest team in the field.

The event pitted the University’s six undergraduate faculties against one another in a cross-campus game of capture the flag. More than 700 participants turned out for the event on Friday night, prepared to battle in the name of faculty pride and the $1,000 first-place prize.Continue...

Multiple-choice trumps essays

There’s something peculiar about the evaluation of essay questions in the largest course on campus. “We don’t mark them as essays per se,” said Jill Atkinson, chair of undergraduate studies for psychology. “We’re not looking for style and prose.”

Since approximately 1,450 students are enroled in introductory psychology, an understanding of facts and theories takes precedent over critiquing an article or writing a formal essay during the course, Atkinson said.Continue...

Cross-Country Campus Briefs

An international organization funded by the U.S. Democratic National Committee is trying to get as many American students in Canada as possible to register for an absentee vote before their state deadlines.

Democrats Abroad is comprised of expatriate Americans who want Americans in foreign countries to vote in favour of the Democratic Party.Continue...

Nine bikes stolen in eight days

Bicycles are everywhere on campus.

Signaling the start of fall, the busy student lifestyle and warm weather combine to make cycling a choice mode of transportation. With the large number of bikes, however, also comes a high risk of thefts.

Campus Security has received nine reports from students who have been victims of bike theft in the past 10 days alone.Continue...

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