School of Graduate Studies hosts second annual post-doctoral research showcase

OISE Open House

Five post-doctoral fellows presented current research projects as part of Post-Doc Appreciation Week

Postdoctoral fellow Greg King at the showcase on Wednesday.

The School of Graduate Studies held their second annual reception on Wednesday to showcase current post-doctoral research efforts from a diverse array of departments and scholars. 

The showcase was organized by Associate Dean in the School of Graduate Studies Marta Straznicky as part of Postdoc Appreciation Week, which is celebrated annually by postsecondary institutions across North America. According to the National Postdoctoral Association, the week is meant to “recognize the significant contributions that postdoctoral scholars make.” 

The University Club played host to five Queen’s postdocs, who presented their research projects to guests in a reception room.

The postdocs at the event spoke in the style of PechaKucha, wherein presenters show 20 slides and speak for 20 seconds about each one. The format, originating in Tokyo and devised by architects, is meant to ensure eloquent, efficient and smooth-flowing presentations. 

Dusan Bucevac started the presentations and spoke about his project regarding laser image projection, specifically in terms of ceramic phosphor development for light conversion. Mohsen Kamandar Dezfouli followed after, showcasing quantum technologies, primarily in the area of “quantum light-matter interaction in plasmonic and photonics platforms.”

Department of Geography and Planning post-doc fellow Greg King elaborated on his expedition and research studying vegetation changes across treelines. In an interview with The Journal, King said he’ll be expanding on his research thus far in order to take on a more expansive scope. He also said that the hiring of undergraduate research assistants has been “particularly helpful” in this regard.

Valerie Michaelson discussed her interdisciplinary research in the areas of Public Health and Theology. Her research focus is the impact of religion and religious institutions on youth and child development.

The showcase ended with the final presentation from Emma Peacocke, a post-doc fellow and professor in the Department of English. Peacocke’s project is focused on “Romanticism and the University,” where she looks at university perceptions and depictions in literature.

Peacocke spoke to The Journal about the first moment she decided to concentrate her research in this area. Remembering back to a conversation with her supervisor about what she wanted to do next in her research, Peacocke said, “I opened my mouth to say I will think about it, and instead I said ‘Oh I will write about universities!’ It was astonishing to me.” 

When commenting, be considerate and respectful of writers and fellow commenters. Try to stay on topic. Spam and comments that are hateful or discriminatory will be deleted. Our full commenting policy can be read here.