Arts Archive: 2007

Grave new world

“I think when you quit hearing sir and ma’am, the rest is sure to follow.”

These are the words of Sheriff Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones) lamenting the decline of traditional American morals in the brilliant new film No Country for Old Men.

Written and directed by the Coen brothers after Cormac McCarthy’s eponymous novel, the film is their best since the 1996 classic Fargo, a long-awaited return to form after the underwhelming Intolerable Cruelty and The Ladykillers.Continue...

Presenting the best albums of 2007

‘Tis the season for end-of-year best-of lists, and Journal staff have gathered to present their picks for the best five albums of 2007.Continue...

Annual benefit mixes art and aid

Along with the downtown Santa Claus Parade and the post-exam departure of thousands of students, the annual Salvation Army benefit concert is a holiday tradition in this city.

Luther Wright, the show’s organizer, is a long-time member of the Kingston music scene—he gained fame playing lead guitar in Weeping Tile in the mid-nineties and for his alt-country cover of Pink Floyd’s The Wall, with his band Luther Wright and the Wrongs.Continue...

Round 3: Hiddens Cameras vs. Ktown

If you have only visited Kingston twice, and the experiences climaxed with discriminatory antics and a heated tussle, the third time may not be the charm.

For the Hidden Cameras—a pop-meets-folk-meets-controversy musical blend—these adventures are all the more incentive to return.Continue...

Instances of a creative history

Looking back at the last 30 years and mining for definitive moments that have turned into blurry memories seems a little daunting. To then take that fog of detail and render it into a historical work of conceptual art is no easy feat.Continue...

Theatre causes chaos

Chaos Theory is about four things: we’re about creating environmentally sustainable theatre from a green perspective, we’re about creating interdisciplinary discourse between the university and the community, we’re about bringing back the concept of storytelling to theatre and finally about making the most engaging, exciting and fun theatre we can.Continue...

In-between being

Sharon Muilwyk’s en route is a vibrant display of colour—an abstract palate that features both the blurred and the bold. Colours pop off the brick walls of The Artel with a vivid and phosphorescent gleam.Continue...

The Wooden Sky reach for the top

Once they’ve started to play shows and promote themselves, most bands don’t change their name—especially after reviews in national newspapers, an appearance on MTV Canada and a variety of festivals, the prospect would seem like a publicity nightmare.Continue...

Rock and Roll Report Card

This September, the Weakerthans released their fourth studio album, Reunion Tour, to the absolute delight of their followers. Reunion Tour is the first album the Weakerthans have offered up in four years, and it’s everything their fans could have asked for.Continue...

Tearing love apart to take a closer look

Love Will Tear Us Apart, the infectious title of Lisa Visser’s new collection of work at the Sleepless Goat, brings with it connotations of Joy Division’s hit single—heartbreak and musings on a bleak life outlook.

The dark and obsessive notion of the song “Love Will Tear Us Apart” intrigued Visser, so she created an exhibit to explore the meanings of this phrase and the history of the song using different media including photography, video stills, book-based artworks and textiles.Continue...

Mixing metaphors, making music

Toronto’s Rock Plaza Central pay more than just lip-service to the idea of creative improvisation in music. Going beyond on-stage songwriting—although they do that, too—everything from the folk-rock band’s membership to its name was made up on the fly.Continue...

Famine has a taste for the unusual

On the east end of Cataraqui Street, a stone’s throw away from the frosty waters of the Kingston Inner Harbour, sits a run-down factory that, upon first sight, looks frighteningly similar to the imagined locale of childhood nightmares.Continue...

Finding art in the process

Inaugural Doodlezoo, on exhibition at the Union Gallery, is a show that finds its identity in working through chaos. Upon entering, one finds the gallery’s space changed from the traditional, white box-like room—on one side it has become a working artist’s studio, with all of the mayhem and disorganization that entails, while the other half of the gallery has become a haphazard notebook—a patched-together collection of memories, ideas and doodles.Continue...

Writers block TV shows

You may have noticed as you’ve tuned in this week for your nightly dose of hilarity from Mr. Colbert, Mr. O’Brien, or, God forbid, Mr. Letterman that they’re still making cracks about the Michael Jackson trial. While a good Wacko Jacko joke will never truly grow old, seeing them retold does grow quite tiresome. And retold they shall be, as late-night comedy shows usually produced on a daily basis have been forced into reruns: they’re the first victims of the Hollywood writer’s strike that began early Monday morning.Continue...

Young rivalry’s sound alive and kicking

Free album giveaways are usually a sign of the desperate and obscure—not an up-and-coming Canadian rock quartet.Continue...

Sketches bring life to fantasy

Over the years a music lover and fervent concert-goer will attend too many shows to count, watch friends’ bands grow up and fizzle out, and witness the evolution, demise and reinvention of icons.

Usually we look back at ticket stubs, photos and anecdotes from those nights to remember when our favourite musicians came to town or when we ventured to the next city over to catch them live. A concert’s atmosphere is volatile; good or bad, it’s dependent on a cross-section of many factors. Band, venue, audience and, hell, even the weather help create a mood.Continue...

Braving the bard’s storms

In his famous lectures on Shakespearean tragedy, the scholar A.C. Bradley once said: “King Lear seems to me Shakespeare’s greatest achievement, but it seems to me not his greatest play.” It’s an undeniable masterpiece. A text containing incredible verbal possibility, humour, hardship, a myriad of themes but it’s also one big yawn.Continue...

Weakerthans still going strong

Winnipeg has long been a surprising hotbed of CanRock talent, and with the release of their new album Reunion Tour, the Weakerthans need not fear for their place in this canon.Continue...

Rock and Roll Report Card

As a whole, this album has the basic components of any Radiohead album: the acoustic and electric guitars, drums, synthesizer and the beautiful (yet at times haunting) vocals of Thom Yorke. The hearsay was true—the band released In Rainbows online, and fans were able to choose their own price. Given this fact, one could only speculate on the quality of this album. This can be said: this album is definitely priceless to hardcore Radiohead fans.Continue...

Brody joins Anderson train

The idiosyncrasy—from set to characters—of any Wes Anderson film is expected. The colour scheme, actors, character flaws, humoristic-melancholic tone and intricate details are instantly familiar and marked as Anderson’s mythology that took off with Rushmore and was affirmed by the Royal Tenenbaums.Continue...

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