Editorials Archive: 2005

Keeping a foot in the past

They say most people only really keep in touch with one, maybe two good friends from high school. Growing up is pretty scary if you ask me.

I was reminded of that by an unexpected visit this weekend. A bunch of my high school friends finally came up to Kingston to celebrate one of their birthdays. They said at last they had an excuse to come trekking three hours out of the GTA.Continue...

Here we go again ...

The dissolution of the Liberal government means we’re in store for yet another season of campaigning. This untimely event could potentially put a damper on the upcoming holidays. Since its inception a mere 17 months ago, Paul Martin’s minority government has faced obstacle after obstacle. According to the Toronto Star , a national Ipsos-Reid poll conducted on Nov. 29 reported that the Liberals and Conservatives are currently neck-and-neck, each with 31 per cent of the country’s support. Meanwhile, the poll reports that the NDP have 18 per cent of the nation’s support.Continue...

ASUS must improve accountability

The recent ASUS budget debacle has left a torrent of unanswered questions in its wake. In September, the largest faculty society at this university reported a net loss of $26,403 for the 2004-05 academic year.Continue...

Maple music appreciation

There are certain things about the Great White North that I noticeably miss when I’m at home in California. The people. The familiarity of the Queen’s campus. Doughnuts from Tim Hortons. Colourful money. Seasons. Not having to listen to people make Canada jokes every five minutes.Continue...

Non-academic discipline needs clarification

Last week, the AMS and SGPS each presented draft reports of their preliminary recommendations on the non-academic discipline system to the University Senate. They were mandated to do so by the Principal’s Task Force on Community Relations which had recommended “strengthening the mandate and resources of AMS and SGPS for addressing non-academic discipline with a focus on off-campus student behaviour.” The SGPS raised concerns at the meeting as to the scope of the Code of Conduct. As it stands, the Code of Conduct could potentially be applied to discipline a Queen’s student who breaches the Code anywhere in the world. The boundaries of the Code of Conduct should be clarified and reinforced during the welcoming ceremony, even before students sign on the dotted line to confirm their acceptance to Queen’s, and thus their agreement to abide by the Code of Conduct.Continue...

Christmas Child has no place in residence

As a Change Project for their Commerce 351 Leadership class, a group of students decided to pitch the idea that dons and students in residences participate in Operation Christmas Child, a worldwide project run by Samaritan’s Purse, a self-described “nondenominational evangelical Christian organization.”Continue...

The beauty of the ongoing now

Looking around at the faces on campus, I’ve noticed a general aura of weariness that is strikingly common at this time of the year. Students adopt a certain zombie-esque quality, going through the day mechanically, with too many wishful thoughts about the upcoming holidays. As Emerson succinctly put it, “we are always getting ready to live, but never living.”Continue...

Bush exploits Veterans Day ceremony

U.S. President George W. Bush has received considerable criticism following his comments at a Veterans Day ceremony at an army depot in Pennsylvania. Veterans Day is similar to the Canadian Remembrance Day. It is a time for Americans to remember those who represented their country through the military during wartime and peacetime. Bush’s comments, however, veered away from a remembrance of the individuals who defended their country and were more like a defence of his administration’s decisions about Iraq.Continue...

Wiretap bill a needless invasion of privacy

On Tuesday, the Liberals introduced Bill C-74, whose short title is the “Modernization of Investigative Techniques Act.” According to the government, C-74 is an “act regulating telecommunications facilities to facilitate the lawful interception of information transmitted by means of those facilities and respecting the provisions of telecommunications subscriber information.”Continue...

Pro patria mori–neither sweet nor proper

As most sentient beings have probably been able to judge from the ubiquitous poppies, Remembrance Day is upon us once again. This day has always struck me as special; the solemnity of elementary school assemblies and the yearly recitations of Wilfred Owen’s wartime poem “Dulce Et Decorum Est,” which never failed to give me the shivers, convinced me that this was a day to be taken seriously. And I continue to believe that wholeheartedly.Continue...

NSSE better measure of university ‘ranking’

This week, Maclean’s released its annual university rankings. Queen’s placed fifth in the medical doctoral category—the same as last year—which, according to the magazine, includes schools that “have a broad range of Ph.D. programs and research, as well as medical schools.” Most surprising and disappointing was the University’s fall from third to seventh-place in overall ranking in the national reputational category, as decided by CEOs, corporate recruiters, and guidance counselorsContinue...

Khadr to face commission, not courts

After 39 months at Guantánamo Bay, Omar Ahmed Khadr, a 19 year-old Canadian citizen, was charged this week with murder and attempted murder in addition to charges for aiding the enemy.Continue...

‘In the cold November rain’

November is a cunning and cruel month. Riding on the popularity of October’s home-cooked meals, falling leaves, and suggestive costume choices, November quietly creeps in and begins its oppressive 30-day reign over our lives. We are driven to despair by November’s gloom and are left crying out for December to come and rescue us with all its festive joy.Continue...

Sponsorship scandal should be a lesson learned

Mr. Justice John Gomery’s first report about the federal sponsorship scandal was released on Tuesday. In his report, Gomery implicates key members of Jean Chrétien’s government, particularly his Chief of Staff Jean Pelletier, former Public Works Minister Alfonso Gagliano and senior bureaucrat Chuck Guité, who ran the sponsorship program until 1999. Prime Minister Paul Martin, however, escapes the report relatively unscathed.Continue...

Smith has right to privacy from teammates

Saskatchewan Roughriders middle linebacker Trevis Smith has been arrested for aggravated assault after a woman alleged that Smith had unprotected sex with her and did not disclose his HIV-positive status.Continue...

Canned heat

If my propensity to procrastination leads me to academically crash and burn this year, at least I can say I left Queen’s knowing how to dance. When I first set foot on campus soil over two years ago, I couldn’t dance to save my life. It was only natural, then, that attending the first-year orientation dance gripped me with a fear matched only by presenting my parents with a substandard report card in middle school.Continue...

50 Cent billboards insult anti-gun activists

Paramount recently removed billboard advertisements promoting 50 Cent’s upcoming film, Get Rich or Die Tryin’, in select Los Angeles neighbourhoods amidst community protests. One advertisement shows the artist posing in a crucifixion-like pose with a gun in one hand and a microphone in the other. Another shows 50 Cent with a gun tucked into his pants, carrying a child. When the billboards appeared in neighbourhoods in South Central Los Angeles, activists faulted the studio for its insensitivity.Continue...

Kashechewan crisis points to larger issues

More than two weeks after E. coli was detected in the water of the Kashechewan First Nations reserve, hundreds are still awaiting evacuation. For two years, the community has been under a boil-water advisory.Continue...

A different kind of sports medicine

I’ve done a lot of dumb things in the name of sport. Two nights ago, I added mild hypothermia to the list.

I ran a hard track workout with the Queen’s ski team and didn’t bother changing into dry clothes for the chilly walk home. I walked in the door, threw off my tights and long underwear and hopped into a hot shower. It must have triggered some weird biochemical response, because as soon as I left the shower, I started shivering so uncontrollably that within minutes I was huddled in bed in a sweatshirt and three blankets.Continue...

Mirza the wrongful target of fatwa

Rising female tennis player Sania Mirza is the subject of a growing controversy. The 18-year-old, a self-described devout Muslim, has been criticized by some Muslim clerics for her attire on the court. Her polo shirt and tennis skirt are a common and comparatively modest combination in the sport. However, the clerics argue that Mirza is going against the principles of Islam by wearing clothing that fails to cover large areas of her body.Continue...

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