Editorials Archive: 2005

Aberdeen reaffirms JComm’s powers

An emergency AMS Assembly meeting was convened Tuesday night to discuss the events on Aberdeen street during Homecoming weekend. Unanimously, assembly members voted in favour of maintaining the AMS Judicial Committee (JComm), a student-run, non-academic discipline system. It is a complaints-based system whereby any member of the community—police, Kingston residents or students—can file a complaint, which will then be reviewed by the AMS Prosecutor’s Office.Continue...

Aberdeen coverage too sensational

As a student paper, the Journal seeks to represent students properly, with accurate, balanced coverage and without profit quotas to meet. Photos of the Aberdeen party have appeared in major papers like the Toronto Star . However, they will never be photos taken by the Journal . In an effort to prevent the proliferation of the incorrect idea that Queen’s is a school out of control, Journal photographers have made a conscious decision not to release their photos to other media outlets.Continue...

The woes of retail therapy

Given the stress of a new school year, a friend and I decided to spend some time on ourselves. We dubbed it “retail therapy,” and spent the afternoon shopping, not because we needed the clothes, and not for lack of anything better to do, but because we both wanted to experience the joy of buying new things. This, I’m aware, is the epitome of materialism and the result of living in a fairly capitalist society.Continue...

Madness and mayhem on Aberdeen

Smashing bottles is not a Queen’s tradition. Flipping cars is not part of the Queen’s spirit. As a student body, Saturday night was not our finest moment.Continue...

Frosh, this one’s for you

Back in September of my first year, I got crafty. I grabbed sparkles, squeezed out dollops of glue and snipped myriad letters from fashion magazines to construct a garbage-bag sign to post on my res room door.Continue...

Energy drink raises concerns

Mountain Dew’s energy drink is a new addition to the slew of other caffeinated beverages that are now available in Canada. A recent Globe and Mai l article that detailed how the new drink stacked up alongside other caffeinated drinks. It reported that Mountain Dew Energy contains 91 milligrams of caffeine while Red Bull has 130 milligrams and Monster has 169 milligrams. In comparison, a cup of brewed coffee contains 135 milligrams of caffeine while a cup of tea has 43 milligrams.Continue...

Terry Fox Run still going strong

Terry Fox’s legacy lives on. This past Sunday, Queen’s students, along with people across Canada and around the world, participated in the 25th annual Terry Fox Run. In 1977, when he was just 18 years old, Fox was diagnosed with bone cancer. While in hospital, he was moved by the patients around him to run his “MarathonContinue...

Fill ’er up

My main squeeze is quite the catch. He’s tall, dark and handsome. People who know him describe him as smooth, bold and full-bodied. He gives me a reason to wake up in the morning and more often than not, the means to do so.Continue...

Transgenderism still taboo

The issue of transgendered people is still sometimes as taboo in a community as intellectually progressive as Queen’s as it is in most parts of the globe. In California, two men were convicted this week of second-degree murder for killing a transgendered teen in October 2002. Michael Magidson and Jose Merel, who had been intimately involved with Eddie “Gwen” Araujo, strangled and tortured the teen after they discovered Araujo’s sexual orientation.Continue...

The Aberdeen alternative

The University’s most recent attempt to thwart attendance at the Homecoming celebrations on Aberdeen Street is taking shape as a five-hour concert at Miller parking lot, featuring bands like Metric and Billy Talent. The details of a licensed area aren’t clear yet, but it is clear the University is spending a large amount of money to deter students from partying on Aberdeen Street. It has even gone so far as to request an exemption from the noise bylaw so that the concert can continue past the 11 p.m. cutoff time.Continue...

No books for Mrs. Becks

It was in the midst of this revived courtship that an article about Victoria Beckham, formerly Posh Spice of Spice Girls fame, caught my eye. In an interview to promote her new biography, Mrs. Beckham casually mentioned that she had never read a book in her life. I wasn’t sure what was worse: the fact that she openly admitted to never having read a book, or how she dropped this bombshell while promoting her own biography. I was dumbfounded, to say the least.Continue...

Police enforce law in Ghetto

If someone on the streets of Kingston is caught carrying open liquor or violating noise by-laws or is judged to be drunk to the point where they’re endangering themselves or others, they should be charged. That said, students should not be held to a higher standard of the law than permanent residents. Just as visible minorities shouldn’t be targeted by police by virtue of their skin colour, neither should students by virtue of their age, where they live or simply because they are students.Continue...

Cancellation a poor decision

After-Hours Childcare (AHC) is an important service to those who use it and before the AMS Board of Directors took the liberty of cancelling it, they should have come up with a firm solution instead of an ill-researched alternative that has left the 17 to 20 families who use the service with no inexpensive childcare provider to turn to.Continue...

The Journal vs. Crimson

Harvard University claims to have the oldest campus newspaper in North America. The Harvard Crimson started publishing on Jan. 24, 1873. The Crimson beats out the Journal —yes, the very paper in your hands—for the title of oldest campus newspaper in North America by just 10 months. The first issue of the Journal didn’t appear till Oct. 25, 1873.Continue...

CBC woes bring quality into question

The nearly four-week CBC lockout of 5,500 of its employees has brought all of the company’s outlets to a virtual standstill. Negotiations had been taking place between CBC management and its employees’ union for the past 15 months with little progress. The main issue of contention is the CBC’s plan to hire more non-permanent employees in an effort to alleviate financial strains on the company.Continue...

Katrina relief concert raises controversy

On Sept. 2, during NBC’s Concert for Hurricane Relief to benefit victims of Katrina hip hop musician Kanye West diverted from his teleprompt script to make some very pointed and unexpected comments. West expressed his anger and disappointment in the Bush administration’s response to the disaster, even going so far as to say, “George Bush doesn’t care about black people.”Continue...

Delving into human nature

Earlier this week, on a particularly sticky July afternoon, my friend Emily met me for lunch. It was one of those Maine days where the sun shines so brightly that the entire world seems illuminated; one of those days where even the most mediocre elements of your surroundings assume a certain glow. After we settled on cold Italian sandwiches underneath a patio umbrella right near the Portland waterfront, we hopped back in the hot car seats so that I could head back to work.Continue...

Welcome to Queen’s: a primer

As first-year students arrive at Queen’s, they will be entering a dynamic environment and one they can influence more than they may think.Continue...

Journalism’s powers on trial

New York Times journalist Judith Miller was sent to jail on July 6 for for refusing to testify to a grand jury inquiry into the leak of the identity of CIA operative Valerie Plame. Miller was in contact with a source who had information about the leak, but will not reveal who it is. This inquiry has become a witch hunt and Miller’s arrest violates the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment which protects free speech and the free press.Continue...

Polygraph, anyone?

What is truth?” Pontius Pilate’s question seems particularly apt in light of recent political events. In an age where an increasingly disillusioned electorate tends to see politicians as liars and cheaters, the search for truth seems to have fallen by the wayside.Continue...

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