Editorials Archive: 2006

The value of education

Two weeks ago, my colleague and friend Katrina Ludlow wrote that her experiences at the Journal have been a “diamond in the rough” of her university education. Many other Queen’s students feel the same way about their contributions to competitive teams, art and cultural groups, or activities that help benefit fellow students. With so many of my peers considering their time out of the classroom to be the most valuable part of their experience, it’s interesting that the formal evaluation of our worth as students pays little (if any) attention to these contributions.Continue...

Canada’s new ‘united’ nation

Earlier this week, Canada’s House of Commons voted overwhelmingly in favour of a motion to
recognize the Québécois as “a nation within a united Canada.” Canada is already an officially bilingual country, with a separate and unique culture, language and history of Québec fully noted. Why then, was there a need to further the recognition?Continue...

Happy (politically correct) holidays

This past week, residence dons received sensitivity training on how to handle the holiday season while causing the least amount of offense. The outcome—designed to make students feel less excluded by prohibiting dons from putting up Christmas lights or organizing group viewings of Christmas movies—will end up causing all students to miss out on the spirit of the season.Continue...

The waiting game

We’re all in a state of continuous uncertainty, waiting for the big envelope in the mail, or the phone call offering us the interview. For the next few months, we’ll be contending with assignments, exams and the reality of facing an uncertain future.Continue...

Split ends for income tax

The Conservative government is in the process of preparing their 2007 Budget, and one of the proposed changes is a complete overhaul of the Canadian taxation system. The proposed change involves income splitting—where income differences between married partners are evenly distributed, or more simply, the income of partners is averaged for tax purposes.Continue...

Six inches between your ears

Mental training has become an important aspect of athletic preparation, although it’s not always treated with the seriousness it deserves.Continue...

A crinkle in time

As exams creep up, we cram our time full of books and marks and coffee; it’s threw this experience that I have learnt a bit about geography but, thankfully, more about how important it is to take a step back and a deep breath to think about everything else that matters more in my life than a percentage.Continue...

Set your priorities straight

With a university life crammed with courses, part-time jobs and extra-curriculars, it seems that there isn’t enough time in the day to accomplish everything, including taking proper care of one’s health.
It may be a personal decision on how to structure priorities, but there is a substantial amount of societal pressure to focus on present gains, whatever the risk. It’s important, therefore, to look out for signs of unhealthy and possibly life-threatening behaviours in friends such as alcohol abuse, eating disorders and depression.Continue...

Rosen’s close call

What was most surprising about Monday’s municipal election results was incumbent mayor Harvey Rosen’s 1.93 percent victory over Rick Downes. Although Rosen ultimately garnered the most votes, he received a much needed wake-up call from thousands of voters.Continue...

Friday night fights

Almost every Friday or Saturday night that I’ve been out, I’ve seen at least one or two fights, mostly involving inebriated students who’ve just left the bar. Generally, it stays on the street, but sometimes, it’ll be inside a campus building. Last weekend, a fight broke out in front of the Walkhome kiosk.

I’m not trying to say that there’s been a recent rise in fighting on or off campus, but for some reason, I’ve been noticing it more.Continue...

Our endorsements

On Monday, Nov. 13, Kingston residents will vote in the municipal election to elect a mayor, as well as representatives to city council. It’s important that students don’t neglect this chance to vote as the elected candidates will have a significant influence over the areas in which we live, work and play over the next four years. We offer our endorsements for mayor and in the wards where most students live: Sydenham, Williamsville, King’s Town and Portsmouth.Continue...

Instant knowledge at the price of wonder

In the past few months, I have come to frequently use the “free-of-charge, downloadable, virtual globe program” (as trusty Wikipedia tells me) known as Google Earth. Now, I don’t profess to being a computer nerd, or anything close to it, but it didn’t take me long to download and see for myself what everyone was talking about.Continue...

Hard to take rankings seriously

Last week, The Globe and Mail released its 2006 University Report Card magazine, with rankings based on student satisfaction. Maclean’s magazines university issue comes out today. Although the articles are informative, realistically, most people buy these magazines for the rankings. Unfortunately, the surveys are only based on student opinion and cannot be looked at as objective.Continue...

How much is too much?

How much homework is too much? How about when it prevents a child from learning and experiencing a well-rounded life outside the classroom? The debate over the amount of homework that children are receiving has heightened in the last few years signaling a need to re-evaluate the way our education system approaches teaching, learning and designing curriculum.Continue...

Daylight savings can’t save us

I woke up Sunday morning with a start. A quick look at my alarm clock confirmed what I had feared—I had overslept. That ambitious plan of showing up at Stauffer as soon as the doors were thrown open to eager keeners such as myself was clearly thwarted. No, the pop-up wasn’t a warning of embarrassing photos already posted and tagged. It was a kind little reminder that, hours previous, the clock had shifted from 2:00 a.m. to 1:01 a.m.Continue...

Grozelle’s parents deserve answers

Royal Military College student, 21-year-old Joe Grozelle, disappeared in the early morning on Oct. 22, 2003 and was found three weeks later in the Cataraqui River. The most disturbing aspect of this, however, is that after two separate autopsies the cause of his death is still not confirmed.Continue...

The Sydenham slight

The AMS has decided to endorse candidates in the municipal election this year—the first time in recent memory that they have thrown their support behind a group of candidates at the municipal level.

In a meeting at Kingston city hall last Thursday, AMS Assembly voted to endorse Harvey Rosen for mayor and Ed Smith for Williamsville, but decided against endorsing a candidate in Sydenham, the district the University belongs to.Continue...

VIA madness

Canada’s National Railway system, today known as VIA Rail, has come to a sad and pitiful state. The once great transportation system that connected the country from sea to sea has taken a steep nose dive in the customer service department. And the worst part is, they could be truly great.Continue...

Research in the classroom

It has recently come to the attention of many students that their professors are spending more time on research, and less on teaching. It’s not only the fault of the school or its professors; it’s a systemic problem of universities becoming more research-intensive and less focused on undergrad education, mainly for the purposes of funding.Continue...

Separate but not equal

The United States Education Department is planning to enforce changes in the Title IX anti-discrimination law, which will come into effect Nov. 24. These changes will allow U.S. public schools to create “separate but equal” classrooms based on gender divisions. Individual elementary and high schools will be allowed complete discretion over implementing gendered subjects, grades or entire institutions.Continue...

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