March 30, 2017

Editorials Archive: 2007

The last word

Well, sort of. It’s not the last word in any kind of Old Testament mass hysteria sense—I’m not trying to suggest it’s the end of the world. What I mean is this is the last signed editorial for the Journal until January, meaning no more Journal until the New Year and so I’m left writing the last word for you.Continue...

Queen’s shorts on sustainability

The Queen’s Centre will be the first campus building deemed environmentally friendly by the leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating system. Although this project—and endeavours such as retrofitting—shows some commitment to sustainability, there’s a lot more Queen’s should do to generate a greener campus.Continue...

Racism in broad daylight

Last week, a female Queen’s professor reported being assaulted on campus by four male students wearing engineering jackets. The incident occurred on Nov. 14 when the woman was forced off the sidewalk by the students who taunted her with racial slurs.Continue...

The lost art of courtship

There are differences between men and women. I’m not a biology major but I know that an average male has a penis, while your typical female has a vagina. You have one or the other. To quote Abraham Lincoln, “We hold these truths to be self-evident.” Go ahead, have a look. Honest Abe never told a lie.Continue...

Saudi rape verdict a violation

A 19-year-old woman in Saudi Arabia who was gang raped by seven men has been sentenced to six months in prison and 200 lashings. Initially, the woman was sentenced to 90 lashes for travelling in a car with an unrelated male. The lashings were more than doubled and a jail sentenced added to her punishment on the basis that the woman was attempting to “aggravate and influence the judiciary through the media,” according to the Globe and Mail.Continue...

RCMP weapon abuse stunning

The keenness of police to use Tasers is alarming, and warrants real investigation. Tasers can kill people and their misuse necessitates a reassessment of who is using them and when.Continue...

Home too far away from home

Imagine you enter yourself in a year-long cooking competition, one that you’ve entered many preceding years. After steady improvement, you’re especially confident about your performance this year. You’ve had the same kitchen for more than 30 years, one steeped in tradition, so everything seems to be going your way.Continue...

Don’t hang DSP out to dry

A recent conference held at Queen’s brought together apparel purchasing representatives from four Ontario universities to discuss the possible implementation of the Designated Suppliers Program (DSP).Continue...

Students tuning out CFRC

CFRC needs to market itself if the Queen’s community is going to realize what they’re tuning out on.Continue...

Ti(red) of the consumer cause

Rubber bracelets, an iPod and a T-shirt—is this an ensemble that can save the world? Somehow the current trend of shopping for “The Cause” comes across as counter-intuitive to say the least. As if companies tagging products with specific colours to symbolise causes and cures could elevate the great North American trend to meaningful levels. Buying a red iPod translates into $10 going towards The Global Fund to Fight Aids. Cool. I can buy Kleenex to support breast cancer. Right on.Continue...

Muted protest to power grab in Pakistan

Hopes of democratic progress in Pakistan were dashed last week when President Pervez Musharraf—who is also the leader of the country’s military—suspended the country’s constitution and declared a state of emergency. The country has faced significant turmoil in the last month following the return of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto, who had been exiled in Dubai but had pledged to run in the election slated for this January.Continue...

Scoring top athletes not main goal

Students come to Queen’s because they’re offered a high-quality education and the opportunity to pursue their interests and talents. Discrimination based on those interests and skills will have a polarizing effect and bring the University’s priorities into question.Continue...

Don’t sweat the small stuff

Stay in school as long as you can!

Seriously, if Billy Madison said it, it must be true. But, I guess he also said that pissing your pants is cool. So, maybe I’m torn—somewhere between pissing my pants and becoming a scholar.

I want to enjoy school as much as possible because I know that my years at Queen’s are going to be the best in my life. I need to enjoy every moment of university and stop stressing over the small things. And by small things, I mean “academics”—they’re over-rated.Continue...

City can’t cop out on police bill

On Oct. 16, city councillors voted by a margin of 11 to two in favour of asking Queen’s to cover the policing costs of Homecoming 2007. The bill is estimated to be as high as $353,000, including the police costs from the Ontario Provincial Police public order unit, the Toronto public order unit and the Kingston police.Continue...

Canada’s asbestos exports immoral

Asbestos is one of the most widely recognized carcinogens and has been outlawed by 40 nations—Canada excluded.Continue...

Eat. Sleep. Play Nintendo Wii.

Having spent the past week suffering from a bout of strep throat, and luckily graced with a break from the madness of midterms, I was strangely in the possession of free time. Usually my spare time would be spent catching up with friends or frantically trying to do a photo assignment for the Journal, but in my slightly contagious and debilitated state, I was resigned to staying at home, wondering what I could do instead of sleeping.Continue...

Draft code needs clarification

Proposals to change the Queen’s Code of Conduct expand the one-page document to seven and include clauses with more explicit definitions of non-academic disobedience and its repercussions. The University unveiled its draft this summer, and is collecting feedback on it.Continue...

Academic under-funding 101

Budget cuts are an unfortunate reality of avoiding financial woes, but they can’t just be swallowed if their allocations are so visibly disproportionate.Continue...

Reduce, reuse and dispose?

When I was a little kid, one of my greatest joys was going to the recycling depot with my dad. I know that this may not be normal—I was also really into Lego and Barbies and climbing trees—but I just thought it was so cool that our old bottles and boxes and cans could be recycled into something else.Continue...

Vote on OUSA? OUSA who?

Comprised of seven member university coalitions, the Ontario University Student Alliance (OUSA) is a collective body that actively lobbies the provincial government to provide for superior post-secondary education, whether that be by lowering tuition fees or improving the quality of teaching.Continue...

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