Editorials Archive: 2007

A (closed) New York state of mind

When Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad arrived to speak at Columbia University this Monday, he was met with taunts from the press and thousands of protestors. The University had already faced a division amongst students and faculty as to whether the school should have invited Ahmadinejad as a speaker at its World Leaders Forum.Continue...

Counselling your classmates

Last spring AMS candidate team CMM campaigned across campus touting the possibility of initiating a peer counselling service. The proposal is panning out: the Peer Support Centre will open its doors in the JDUC in November, with eight to 10 volunteers providing non-academic counselling to students.Continue...

Nightmare on Alfred Street

Coming into the last September of my undergraduate year, I expected no surprises and smooth sailing—only to find out quickly that it’s never safe to assume anything out of life.

At the end of the first week at my new apartment, my roommate and I had no idea why we developed severe allergies and shortness of breath, until we spotted large quantities of black mould behind the kitchen cupboard and the stove. The problem hit a climax when my roommate found out the mould had spread to her bedframe; as I was sipping coffee at the Common Ground, she called and said, “I’m not living here anymore.”Continue...

Creating an unequal playing field

In June, the Athletics and Recreation Review suggested Queen’s re-evaluate the way its programs are funded compared to other universities and look into charging additional fees for instructional programs, intramurals and tickets to varsity games.Continue...

More police unwelcome guests

Kingston Police have had their hands full since Frosh Week marked the kickoff of the school year three weeks ago. In a Police Services Board meeting last week, Police Chief Bill Closs said this was the worst Frosh Week he has seen in 12 years.Continue...

The skinny on body image

This year at London Fashion Week models were given, instead of their usual makeup and bath products, goodie bags of condescension and belittlement, labelled as sandwiches and fresh fruit.Continue...

Queen’s caught cutting class

All University departments are being forced to tighten their belts following four per cent budget cuts across the board. These cuts were necessary because of higher than normal wage, salary and pension increases and insufficient government funding, said Vice-Principal (Operations and Finance) Andrew Simpson. They caused the mechanical engineering department to cut six of its courses. Now students—many of them entering their final year—are left baffled by the suddenness of their current situation. Some are unsure they will graduate on time, or worry they won’t have the requirements they need when they enter the workforce.Continue...

Cameras’ record not reliable

As campus security remains of paramount concern, Queen’s is looking into installing multiple closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras throughout campus.Continue...

No snow this Christmas? A naan-issue

Grade 1 was the first year I ever bought into the materialistic trend of have-to-have, won’t-be-cool-without latest collectible item. At that age, it was a cutthroat competition to have the biggest, sparkliest, fuzziest sticker collection. If you had scratch-n-sniff, you were sailing. My array of stickers was pretty average, but I had one page in my collection book that no one could even contend with—my page of traditional Hindu bindis.Continue...

Campus security needs assessment

Two recent sexual assaults at Carleton University in Ottawa and York University in Toronto stunned not only faculty and students, but anyone who had presumed campuses to be secure environments.Continue...

The Cleavers would be shocked

Earlier this week Statistics Canada released the results from its latest census on Canadian households.

The polls, taken during 2006, found Canada is perpetually diversifying its familial structures; stats show that same-sex couples, single parents, and common law marriages have all increased since 2001, with married couples in decline.Continue...

Insights from an introvert

When I was six years old, my favourite song was a Sesame Street ditty called, “I don’t want to live on the moon.” I sympathized with Ernie because, quite frankly, I didn’t want to live on the moon, either. My little six-year-old self was horrified by the thought.Continue...

Quebec forum far from ‘reasonable’

On Tuesday a small forum of Quebeckers gathered in Gatineau to discuss the implications of the province’s diversifying population. The commission, endorsed by the provincial government and Premier Jean Charest, is intended to explore the extent to which Quebec should make “reasonable accommodations” for its growing minority populations while preserving its distinct culture. The issue of cultural accommodation has increasingly become an issue in Quebec over the past several months.Continue...

Chantler’s diatribe: hardly harmless

There are those who would assert that 21st-century society has taken political correctness too far, extending it to the point at which restrictions on expression become ludicrous.Continue...

Ain’t no Hollaback Girl

Last Thursday started off like any other—after a late night of putting an issue of the Journal together, I set out on my usual route home. Though the walk is a particularly precarious route through patches of unlit sidewalk and creepy old houses, I’ve only recently started to become wary of it. After the recent sexual assaults at Carleton and York University, who can blame me?Continue...

Public school not religion’s domain

Politicians are no strangers to the taste of a foot in their mouth, and Ontario Progressive Conservative leader John Tory is no exception. Last week, he unveiled his plan to bring faith-based schools into the publicly funded education system. He told reporters he would support these schools teaching creationism and “other theories.” Several hours later, the PC leader backtracked on his remarks qualifying his proposal with the caveat that such theories should be taught only in religion classes.Continue...

Sell with smarts, not sex

Everybody knows sex sells. Sexual images and ideas have permeated the advertising industry for decades, and the concern that it objectifies women and devalues sex itself is nothing new.Continue...

Man enough to change?

When I first came to Queen’s, I was intrigued by the tradition and romance of it all—hearing bag pipes at random times around campus, the Band in their kilts, and especially the use of Gaelic.

Living in a residence called Ban Righ seemed something like living in a Scottish castle—until I went inside, that is. During Frosh Week and at Homecoming games, I enthusiastically donned my coveralls and sang the Oil Thigh.Continue...

A little less cheer, a little more beer

When Frosh Week kicked off on Wednesday, the thundering of demolition work was barely audible over the cheers of first-years, led by their equally spirited frosh leaders, parading through campus. Although the noise and energy is typical of every year, close attention would soon have any upper-year at a loss for words—literally.Continue...

Blunders fuel pub powder keg

The Engineering Society executive’s announcement earlier this summer that Clark Hall Pub is closed indefinitely came as a shock to many—not because the pub’s operational and financial woes were surprising but because of the way the closing of such a campus fixture was handled.Continue...

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