Editorials Archive: 2007

Hold the canapés, please

When I was 19, I spent the summer as an unpaid intern in Toronto, and my boyfriend moved in with me. It was more a matter of convenience than any romantic notion of eternal bliss. Unfortunately, we grossly underestimated the cost of living… and grossly overestimated his employability.Continue...

Love the book, not the merchandise

J.K. Rowling released Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows , the seventh and final book in the much-beloved Harry Potter series, at midnight July 20. In 24 hours, world sales of the book topped 10 million copies as aficionados of all ages flocked to bookstores with an almost religious fervor.Continue...

Less talk, more rock for green office

In June, Vice-Principal (Operations and Finance) Andrew Simpson announced the University is creating a new sustainability office to oversee environmental initiatives across Queen’s campus.Continue...

Your Big Brother Facebook

Sites like Facebook should enact a policy that prevents the outside transfer of your personal information. But unless the YouTube generation votes against Internet privacy violations with their dollars and cents, Big Brother is here to stay.Continue...

Yellow card for tardy review

In February, the University announced it was conducting an in-depth review of its athletics department. According to a Feb. 5 press release, the project was intended to “define what the Queen’s community expects of Athletics & Recreation at Queen’s.” Former Dean of Student Affairs and computing professor Bob Crawford, who led the review along with Dean of the School Graduate Studies and Research Janice Deakin, said the review would help the University define its “philosophy of sport.” The review’s original deadline was March 30.Continue...

Lockdown on free speech

Several months ago 15-year-old Grade 10 student Kieran King heard a presentation about drug use in a high-school class. Thinking the presentation poorly researched, King sought out information on the Internet about the relative health risks of alcohol, marijuana and tobacco. He told some of his fellow students marijuana appeared the least hazardous of the three.Continue...

A little less conversation

The year I turned 16, my parents decided that something had to be done about the unsettling notion of their daughter behind the wheel. They figured that if I ever got into an accident, everything would be okay if I had a cell phone. Apparently they hadn’t noticed the growing number of drivers swerving across the roadways in their attempts to steer while juggling their bite-sized cell phones.Continue...

Leave journalists out of policing

On May 19, Vancouver police officers contacted Anti-Poverty Coalition member David Cunningham, claiming to be journalists for the commuter paper 24 Hours and requesting an interview. Cunningham met them, whereupon they arrested him for threats he made to members of Vancouver’s Olympic Games organizing committee. This impersonation of journalists by police officers is a frightening and appalling abuse of power. A journalist’s role is predicated in large part on trust: it’s the journalist’s job to be open in establishing a relationship with a subject and a reader.Continue...

Treat the cause, not the symptom

The Gazette , Western University’s student newspaper, published a spoof issue on March 30 containing shocking and offensive material, including a reference to London’s chief of police taking a “wild vagina” “into a dark alley to teach it a lesson.”Continue...

The SGPS’s ineffectiveness

As graduate and professional enrolment (law in particular) increases, pushing this campus towards a mixture of nearly one-third graduate students, the need for student representation is obvious to all involved. Unfortunately, the current representational structure—made up of the ill-equipped and poorly run Society for Graduate and Professional Studies (SGPS)—has failed to meet the needs of current graduate students, much less those to come.Continue...

Darts and laurels 2006-07

The Journal lists the headline hits and misses of the year.Continue...

Taking back the streets

When I was in high school, I imagined university the way I had seen it in movies and on TV: playing Frisbee on the lawn in front of the library; walking across a green, grassy commons talking about Foucault with my articulate, bookish friends.Continue...

AMS motion brash, deluded

The AMS should think twice before passing silly motions aimed to protect students who throw illegal parties and are deluded into believing they have privacy rights on Facebook.Continue...

Tenure shouldn’t grant immunity

If professors are being disciplined for external actions that may affect their employment at the University, it would be nice to see a greater effort for accountability and more open disciplinary procedures, as well as a clearer definition of what constitutes gross misconduct, incompetence and neglect of academic duties.Continue...

V is for Victory

In a few short weeks, my five-year Queen’s career will finally limp to a close. I’ll have a three-year degree, the possible beginnings of an incredibly low-paying but satisfying career completely unrelated to said degree, financial independence and something a lot of students don’t have when they graduate: their virginity.Continue...

A call for tuition transparency

Commerce students are required to take a certain number of elective credits in arts and science. An arts and science student can expect to pay $517.63 in course fees for a half-credit arts and science course; however, the same course requires commerce students to shell out $1,019.93. Evidently, extra funds are required of business students to cover the costs of certain amenities afforded to them as members of the commerce faculty; however, these costs should be part of their student fees rather than added to the price of arts and science courses.Continue...

Students and Lam need to learn from Cockroach

Last Friday, Phil Lam was awarded the Golden Cockroach—for the second year in a row. But this year, not only did Lam win the top prize, he also received all of the positions on the infamous Golden Cockroach podium. The Key to the Ghetto Award and the Golden Cockroach Award, given to the best and worst student landlords respectively, is one of the better ideas to come out of the AMS in recent years and hopefully it will continue to be awarded.Continue...

The benefits of co-operation

From about 1993 to 1999, my relationship with my brother was defined by competition.

The two of us would compete to see who could stuff the most grapes in his or her mouth, who could hold his or her breath the longest and who could run along the most driftwood logs without falling off.

Daniel and I eventually outgrew this phase, however, and it’s a good thing that most adults are able to do so: if such historical partners as Watson and Crick and Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin had felt the same need to place competition over all else, humankind would be much worse off for it ...Continue...

Don’t call us, we’ll call you

The AGM is one of the only times during the school year when students can come forward, vote, and have a say in what their student government does. With so few opportunities for students to really engage with the student government, it’s unfortunate that the AMS treats the meetings so flippantly ...Continue...

May as well say nothing

Shortly after Jeff Brown was announced as next year’s AMS social issues commissioner, an anonymous e-mail was sent out alleging that there were problems with the hiring process, requesting that the AMS refuse to ratify Brown’s hiring and urging students to send letters of complaint to the new AMS executive, AMS Information Officer Greg McKellar and AMS Human Resources Officer Emily Lauzon.
The Journal encourages the authors of the petition to write a signed letter to the editor clarifying their concerns and specifying the “questionable hiring practices” of the AMS.

We’d be more than happy to publish it.Continue...

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