Editorials Archive: 2008

Getting the wrong picture

Since the first day I took on the role as a photographer for the Journal up until this point, I’ve been sworn at, yelled at, smiled at, frowned at, laughed at, threatened and hit by various objects. All of this has happened while still at the Journal house and not actually out on assignment. When I was actually on assignment, I’ve been covered in mud at the Grease Pole, hit by a puck at a Gaels game, violently threatened by drunk people during Homecoming, and generally regarded as the creepy guy who takes pictures. This, I guess, is all part of the job—to visually document events that may be printed in the media for others to see. Let’s be honest—it’s awkward, creepy, and rather invasive but was it always this way?Continue...

RWS suited for success

Team Radcliffe-Wang-St. Clair’s commendable priorities, demonstrable leadership skills and engaging platform make them the team best suited to take charge of the AMS next year.Continue...

At a loss for words

I almost wasn’t going to write this signed editorial. I was afraid admitting what I’m about to admit might expose me as more of a nerd than I would like.

But in the end I had to write it. My choices were between a cheesy reflection on my past four years at Queen’s and a rambling piece on moral responsibility in which I reference Uncle Ben from Spiderman.Continue...

Dr. Mom isn’t welcome

An article in this week’s issue of Maclean’s magazine addresses the doctor shortage plaguing Canadian health care. The article points to a growing number of female doctors it claims fuel the crisis because they statistically work fewer hours than their male counterparts.Continue...

Redefining the mission

A 90-page report released this week recommends Canada stay in Afghanistan and refocus its NATO-led deployment to emphasize diplomacy, reconstruction and training of Afghan forces. The report was written by an independent panel headed by former Liberal cabinet minister John Manley.Continue...

Town-gown standoff

Another Christmas break has gone by, and with it, another spate of break-ins in and around the Ghetto. Most Queen’s students don’t seem to be the least bit taken aback by this state of affairs; it seems to be viewed more as a part of student life—along with missing street signs, unkempt streets and garbage and recycling services that are somewhat less than ideal. Apart from the ubiquitous police cars and one weekend a year—you can guess which one I’m referring to—the Ghetto seems to be ignored by Kingston police services and City Council.Continue...

Scary new trend is born

The U.S. teenage birth rate rose in 2006 for the first time in 15 years, Maclean’s magazine reported this week. The article asserts the increase in teenage pregnancies is part of a growing “trend” glamourizing being a young mom.Continue...

Accounts need a sitter

On March 16, 2005 the AMS Board of Directors cancelled the After-Hours Childcare (AHC) service that had been in operation since 1995. The service provided weekend and weeknight childcare. It was decided that the money collected from the AHC’s $1 opt-outable fee would go to either the Ban Righ Centre or Queen’s Day Care, but neither service ever received a cheque.Continue...

Knowledge as an end

You’re a sociology major? So what are you going to do with that?”

This is a question I hear all too often and I’m sure many others from similar disciplines have experienced this joy.Continue...

Monopolies still on air

On Tuesday, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) released new provisions intended to curb mergers in Canadian media.

The CRTC announced three major rules that seem to be a direct response to the ongoing expansion of media conglomerates such as CTVglobemedia Inc. and CanWest Global Communications Corp. As Canada’s two biggest media corporations, they’re subject to criticism for their monopolistic hold on numerous print, television and radio sources.Continue...

Ban would miss target

The federal government needs to come through on its tough-on-crime stance by decreasing the number of weapons—registered or not—on the street. The O’Keefe incident and similar tragedies will only be anomalies if such events stop happening.Continue...

Oh. The places I’ll go?

I need something to tell people. Anything will do. Really, anything—crocodile farmer, sperm whale fisherperson, letter opener to the obscenely wealthy. See? I wasn’t kidding when I said anything.Continue...

A lesson in school safety

A recently released report paints a grim and frightening picture of schools in the Toronto District School Board. The School Community Safety Advisory Panel Report, commissioned last year after the shooting death of 15-year-old Jordan Manners at C.W. Jefferys Collegiate Institute, found many district schools are rife with violence, sexual harassment and a “culture of fear” preventing both students and teachers from coming forward regarding these incidents.Continue...

Clark plan low on reality

On Dec. 15 Engineering Society Vice-President (Operations) Rob Macnamara released his report on how to improve Clark Hall Pub and EngSoc. Unfortunately, it lacked concrete suggestions as to how to get the pub open, first.Continue...

Curb Queen’s cockiness

My friends back home in Toronto think Queen’s students are preppy and cocky. I don’t think we are but it seems to be one of the common assumptions made about Queen’s kids.Continue...

Green China in the bag?

On Tuesday, China’s State Council announced a countrywide ban on plastic shopping bags beginning June 1.

Anyone who sells, makes or distributes the thin plastic bags, which are notorious polluters because of how long they take to decompose, will be fined or have their goods and profits seized.Continue...

Punditry in primaries

The U.S. presidential race has barely begun, but it has already devolved into a dizzying roller-coaster ride of predictions and punditry.Continue...

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