March 30, 2017

Editorials Archive: 2009

Hunting and giving

Around this time of year, some people are starting to think about buying Christmas presents for their loved ones.
Maybe they’ll go
all-out and spend hundreds of dollars on some gadget or jewellery that will lose its novelty within the first few weeks.Continue...

Detainees deserve inquiry

Opposition MPs are urging Prime
Minister Stephen Harper’s government to call a formal inquiry into the treatment of detainees in Afghanistan, the Globe and Mail reported Dec. 1.
Demand for an inquiry evolved as a result of diplomat Richard Colvin’s testimony two weeks ago that detainees taken by Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan are being tortured in Afghan prisons, and that the Harper government has been ignoring warnings on the issue.Continue...

ARC’s fancy, not faultless

The much-anticipated Queen’s Centre opened on Tuesday morning, providing equipped workout spaces, common areas for study and a new and improved food court.
The pristine facilities are an exciting addition to Queen’s campus. The Athletics and Recreation Centre (ARC) improves upon the PEC’s fitness environment by leaps and bounds, offering state-of-the-art equipment with features like individual television screens installed on cardio machines.Continue...

Home, sweet home

As the temperature continues to drop and flu season begins to settle in, precautionary actions against the H1N1 virus become ever more prevalent in the minds of the general public.

But as November rolls slowly to an end, I’m becoming more and more weary of another kind of virus: homesickness, an affliction I am prone to catching around this time of year (and I doubt that I’m alone on this one).Continue...

Probation doesn’t compute

Queen’s Computing Students’ Association (COMPSA) will have its Orientation Week autonomy put on probation in Sept. 2010. COMPSA will instead be integrated with the Arts and Science Undergraduate Society (ASUS)’s Orientation Week.

Acting Faculty of Arts and Science Associate Dean (Studies) Hugh Horton said COMPSA lost its independent orientation week privileges due to past problems with the Academic Orientation Committee (AOC), a board made up of faculty, staff and students.Continue...

Balance salt and sensibility

Many Canadian food manufacturers who are under political pressure to reduce the salt content of their products believe Canadian consumers are to blame for the prevalence of salty foods, the Globe and Mail reported Nov. 19.Continue...

Marginalized by media

Jen Kwok’s “Date An Asian” may have been meant as a playful song, but its critique of mainstream North American culture rings true.

“Where my Punjabis at? Where my Filipinos at? Where my bubble tea-drinkers at?” Kwok croons in her self-described Mariah Carey-esque video.Continue...

No denial for civilian trial

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announced the Obama administration plans to prosecute Khalid Shaekh Mohammed, the brains behind the operation of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the New York Times reported Nov. 14.Continue...

TTC prices a fare raise

The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) is planning to increase its fares starting in Jan. 2010, the Globe and Mail reported Nov. 16. If the fee increase is approved, individual adult fares will rise from $2.75 to $3.00.

The TTC is also putting forth a motion to extend discounted rates for high school students to include university and college students.Continue...

Of fans and friends

It’s an exciting time for football fans. No doubt you’ve already heard by now that the Gaels beat the McMaster Marauders in the OUA semifinals and will be competing against Western for the Yates Cup this Saturday. If waves of Facebook events ranging from pre-game drinking parties to T-shirt sales are any indication, this weekend is going to be wild.Continue...

A score for social studies

The Ontario Ministry of Education will introduce five new social sciences and humanities courses into the high school curriculum starting September 2011.

The courses include gender studies, world cultures, human dynamics, and separate equity studies classes for the college/university and workplace tracks.Continue...

Prisons need professionals

Canada’s federal prisons are experiencing a shortage of mentalhealth professionals, CBC News reported Nov. 9.

Fewer health professionals means initiatives that are important, but not urgent—like rehabilitation programs—tend to be overlooked at the expense of more pressing problems like suicide attempts.Continue...

Lessons from Ms. Frizzle

As today is the 40th anniversary of Sesame Street, I can’t help but remember everything the likes of Big Bird and company taught me in my early childhood years.

I really learned a lot from the folks on Sesame Street. After all, it was the Cookie Monster who taught me that the word “cookie” does indeed start with the letter C.Continue...

U of T blind to benefits

Students at the University of Toronto may lose a favourite professor and a valuable course, the Toronto Star reported Nov. 5.

Rod Michalko, a professor of Disability Studies who is also blind, may not have his contract renewed next year due to budget constraints, despite the fact his classes all have waiting lists.Continue...

Absence or obsolescence

The Vancouver 2010 Olympics will be missing Canada’s head of state, the Toronto Star reported Nov. 8.

Queen Elizabeth II declined the Government of Canada’s invitation to open the Olympic ceremonies this winter. Governor General Michäelle Jean will do the honours instead.Continue...

Back to Barbie basics

This Halloween when trick-or-treaters came knocking, my childhood memories came with them.

Six o’clock brought a Bratz Doll, an unidentified superhero and Harry Potter. I missed the days when I was hurried out the door at six o’clock along with Barbie dolls, Batmans and Sabrina Spellmans.Continue...

Immigration policy is ailing

Auditor-General Sheila Fraser’s report on immigration in Canada has exposed some flaws in the system, the Globe and Mail reported Nov. 3.

Fraser said responsibility for immigration decisions is being increasingly handed over to the provinces and employers, rather than being federally regulated.Continue...

Dialogue promotes dignity

The Quebec College of Physicians has formally endorsed euthanasia “in certain exceptional situations,” the Toronto Star reported Nov. 3.

A poll of 2,000 medical specialists in Quebec indicated 75 per cent support euthanasia, while 81 per cent of the doctors had witnessed euthanasia being practiced in the province.Continue...

A winter wish

If there’s one thing I look forward to when the Halloween season comes to a close, it’s discount candy.

But when you step into your local Shoppers Drug Mart or dollar store this November, you might just be greeted by one of the most terrifying and bewildering sounds—the Christmas carol.Continue...

Protect privacy, avoid fraud

Forensic accountant David Malamed’s investigative project shows it’s easier than one might think to gather other people’s personal information on Facebook, the Toronto Star reported Nov. 1.

Malamed’s experiment involved creating a Facebook profile under a false name, and waiting for “friend” requests from strangersContinue...

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