Editorials Archive: 2009

Paris cyclists need solutions

Paris, France’s 2007 plan to help cut carbon emissions by implementing a shared bicycle-rental system will continue despite major setbacks, the New York Times reported Oct. 31.

The rental system allows inhabitants or visitors in Paris to take bicycles from public docking stations across the city and pedal to their destination.Continue...

Punch drunk love

Amongst my friends and housemates, there’s a drunken compulsion that I’m famous for indulging.

No, not that.Continue...

Vaccinate before it’s too late

According to a recent poll, 48 per cent of Canadians might refuse to get the H1N1 vaccination, the Globe and Mail reported Oct. 26.

An op-ed piece by Juliet Guichon and Ian Mitchell argues Canadians who refuse the vaccine are jeopardizing the public good.Continue...

Invest in kindergarten costs

Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty plans to move forward with implementing a full-day kindergarten program by 2015, the Globe and Mail reported Oct. 27.

The $1.5 billion plan to enrol Ontario’s four- and five-year-olds in full-day schooling comes at a time when Ontario’s projected deficit is sitting at nearly $25 billion.Continue...

The procrastination bug

It’s Saturday night and I have a midterm and two essays due on Monday, an article due sometime tomorrow and a whole lot of reading to finish. So naturally, I’m working on none of the above.Continue...

Boys’ school misses the mark

Boys who underachieve in the classroom may soon have a school of their own, the Globe and Mail reported Oct. 20.

The Toronto District School Board’s new education director, Chris Spence, has proposed the first-ever all-male public elementary school in Ontario.Continue...

Phone ban strict, but safe

The use of hand-held phones while driving in Ontario is now a thing of the past.

A new law came into effect yesterday making it illegal to use a cell phone to talk or text while behind the wheel of a car.Continue...

More than a word

The list of unusable words is long, but getting claustrophobic about my vocabulary won’t help anyone.

Derogatory terms are facing the social firing squad, although there’s one that has yet to drop as hard as the others.Continue...

Shrewd move for languages

Queen’s German, Italian and Spanish departments may merge into a new modern languages and linguistics department for the 2010-2011 school year if a vote this winter proceeds in favour.

Spanish and Italian currently share a department, while German is separate.Continue...

Think reduction, not rank

The Copenhagen summit starting Dec. 7, 2009 is a chance to negotiate a new international treaty addressing climate change, columnist Simon Jackson for CBC News reported Oct. 19.

According to Jackson, the Copenhagen treaty is poised to effect more change than did the Kyoto Protocol given the rise in public support for environmental issues in the “new, post-Inconvenient Truth world.”Continue...

’Tis the season

The transition into autum is a tricky one, as September has a way of lulling me into a false sense of security.

Classes begin but still feel carefree because all those friends you lost to the summer months are bustling around campus once again, offering the ability to reunite everywhere you wander.Continue...

No threat from Web 2.0

Hallmarks of twenty-first century technology like blogs and social networking sites, known collectively as “Web 2.0,” have placed the once-exclusive tools of journalism into the hands of the many, CBC News reported Oct. 16.Continue...

Leaf a vehicle for concern

Japanese car company Nissan will offer its new all-electric car to Vancouver buyers if the city agrees to fund a network of charging stations, the Toronto Star reported Oct 16.

The vehicle, called the Leaf, would hit Vancouver dealerships in 2011 if the government installs a series of 220-volt outlets throughout the city.Continue...

House(mates) and home

October brings with it many things: fall colours, midterms, Thanksgiving turkey and then the onslaught of graduate school applications. Over the past couple of weeks, while searching websites and guidebooks for the right program, it’s becoming ever more apparent that the academic world is bigger than the area bordered by Lake Ontario, West Campus and Johnson St.Continue...

Potential not prize-worthy

Last week, United States President Barack Obama was selected as the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize laureate, CBC News reported Oct. 9.

The Nobel committee awarded the prize to recognize the President’s “extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and co-operation between people.”Continue...

No tolerance, no logic

Six-year-old Zachary Christie has been suspended from a Newark, Delaware elementary school for bringing his camping utensil to the lunchroom, the New York Times reported Oct. 11. The school said Zachary’s utensil, which can serve as a knife, fork and spoon, violated their zero-tolerance policy on weapons. Zachary, who brought the knife to school out of excitement for joining the Cub Scouts, now faces 45 days in a district reform school while his family appeals his punishment.Continue...

Costume components

Halloween is fast approaching, and with little time left to buy a costume I bet you still haven’t figured out what you’re going to be. Don’t worry—I’ve got your back.

Some of you may be content going to a costume store and purchasing another sexy nurse, cat, or police officer outfit, and that’s fine.Continue...

Ease perils of prostitution

Three Canadian prostitutes are lobbying for changes in the way Canada’s laws control the sex business, the Globe and Mail reported Oct. 6.

The women’s case aims to prove Canada’s current stance—prostitution isn’t technically illegal, but soliciting is—exacerbates the dangers of the sex trade.Continue...

Right step for road safety

The Canadian government will allow police to give drivers random breathalyser tests on the road if a proposed new law goes forward, CBC News reported Oct. 5.

Current legislation allows police to conduct breathalyser tests only if they have reasonable suspicion a driver has been drinking.Continue...

Appeasing opinions

Living in North America is a culturally, sexually and intellectually diverse experience. A plethora of views, values and choices contribute in many ways to our global awareness. But it also means there’s a plethora of views, values and choices one has to constantly keep in mind as a sort of obsessive-compulsive concern about being politically correct.Continue...

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