Editorials Archive: 2011

Don’t wake the dreamers

On July 22, a Huffington Post editorial argued against telling children they can achieve anything they want in life. Instead of managing hopes, parents should support their children’s dreams, no matter how far-fetched their dreams seem.Continue...

In a name

To me, the name by which we call something is not happenstance. Far from arbitrary, a name is an integral part of that thing.Continue...

Paint program promising

Kingston city council made a commendable decision last Tuesday to approve a new pilot prison work program.Continue...

Civilian justice oversteps

When almost every person carries a phone and almost every phone has a camera, anonymity doesn’t seem possible in public.Continue...

Funding for staying home

Paypal founder Peter Thiel is offering financial incentives to high school students under 20 to avoid post-secondary education and go the route of the entrepreneur.Continue...

Reunion missing students

Unless students get involved, Spring Reunion has little chance of becoming a cemented tradition.Continue...

Digital shadows

As we tweet, comment, like and post on walls, a shadowy digital version of us is compiled in cyberspace. It’s a virtual copy of ourselves with an appearance, personality and lifestyle.Continue...

Darts and laurels, 2010-2011

Darts and laurels, 2010-2011Continue...

Eds, out

Though the Editorials page acts as the voice of the Journal as a publication, it can’t represent all of its employees at once.Continue...

Go vote

Before using the Vote Compass, I thought it would be a fun little activity with no bearing on how I would actually vote. Seeing the results, however, caused me to reflect on the phenomenon of people supporting politicians whose politics they don’t necessarily agree with.Continue...

Left out on writing?

An article published in the Journal on March 25 considered the status of student writing at Queen’s, as well as the impending preliminary report from the Academic Planning Task Force on April 28.Continue...

Wiki-, wiki-, what?

The so-called “Wikipedians” of Imperial College hope to turn Wikipedia into an official research tool, in acknowledgement of its enormous popularity among students.Continue...

What?

From discussion surrounding Rector Nick Day’s letter and the special vote that took place, to the Alpine Tower controversy at the ASUS Annual General Meeting (AGM), to a motion for AMS to rent a bouncy castle with dancing unicorns and rainbows, I wonder; has this campus gone insane?Continue...

ASUS also faces red light

On March 16, the Arts and Science Undergraduate Society (ASUS) overturned an existing opt-outable Development fee of $8.57, which it has been collecting for the past three years. The fee was overturned at the ASUS Annual General Meeting, which gave all Arts and Science students in attendance the freedom to vote on its future.Continue...

Red light plan for island

Toronto City Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti is pushing a controversial plan to generate revenue for the city—regulating and taxing brothels.Continue...

Gut reaction

About a month ago I watched Tyler, The Creator’s stark video for his single “Yonkers.” The west-coaster had me captivated, spitting his trademark aggravated baritone while delicately balancing a cockroach as it crawled through his fingers.Continue...

Autonomy, or monotony

The Journal’s editorial staff believe that the motion passed by the AMS on March 10th poses a direct threat to the editorial autonomy of this publication, and interferes with its ability to function in line with its existing mandate.Continue...

Losing sheen

What is going on in the mind of Charlie Sheen?Continue...

Emasculated adulthood

Hymowitz has published a new book, entitled “Manning Up: How the Rise of Women Has Turned Men Into Boys,” in which she outlines a stage of life called “preadulthood.”Continue...

Typeface and cyberspace

From a 2007 documentary on Helvetica to a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship for typeface design, fonts and typefaces have recently gained popularity and prestige in the public eye. A Globe and Mail article published March 5 links this spike in visibility to the advent of technology.Continue...

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