April 30, 2017

Features Archive: 2006

The Journal presents ... the best of Kingston

For the past three weeks, the Journal’s website has featured an online survey that allowed you to vote
for your favourite things to do on campus and in Kingston. Today, we present to you what you had to say.Continue...

How throwing rocks can change lives

Mike Karkheck is living proof of the impact that Camp Outlook can have on impressionable young minds.Continue...

Student safety one year later

One year ago, the Queen’s and the Kingston community reeled in the wake of an unthinkable tragedy. In the early hours of March 25, 2005, Justin Schwieg—a 23-year-old fifth-year PhysEd student, football player and bouncer at The Brass—died from injuries caused by what the Kingston police called “an unprovoked assault.” He was stabbed near the second-floor bar of A.J.’s Hangar nightclub.Continue...

On spirituality, student support and the reinvention of the Maid of the Mist

As warm Saturday sunlight streamed in through the windows of Wallace Hall, Mitchell Shewell, the Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Coordinator for the Katarokwi Native Friendship Centre, held up one of his complex, hand-crafted dream catchers and talked about the deep care that had gone into its creation.Continue...

A Wells-spring of political punditry

He may be known as Canada’s foremost political blogger, but Maclean’s magazine columnist Paul Wells would rather not tell you about that.Continue...

New possibilities abound for MCRC

Wanted: one individual willing to work 24/7 as mentor and manager, advocate for students in residence, provide training to 50-plus staff, live in the workplace and pay up front for room and board. Salary: $8,661.Continue...

Orbinski: ‘Just live your questions’

While perched on a crate in a food centre in Baidoa, Somalia in 1992, Dr. James Orbinski looked out at the three white tents designated as morgues. Although the day’s dead were piled up inside, the former president of Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) said he noticed a movement made by a body lying at the top of one heap.Continue...

A lecture in your back pocket

Jessica Wynja, ArtSci ’08, sits in her 8:30 a.m. lecture and tries to scribble down what her professor is saying. Because Wynja hasn’t shaken off her morning grogginess, she can’t write as fast as her professor speaks, and she misses some of his points.Continue...

Married ... with classes

Last August, Andrea Shapero got married. While she has adopted the last name of her new husband, Jonathan, 24, a fourth-year Queen’s medical student, she said she hasn’t yet filed the paperwork to change the name on her school records.Continue...

How $8,000 became $523.85

When former ASUS Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer Ian Anderson presented his outgoing 2004-05 budget at the Sept. 29 ASUS Assembly meeting, the net profit from last year’s ASUS jacket sales was listed among hundreds of other revenues and expenses.

The profit from jackets was $523.85—a small profit within a budget that included a $29,652 loss from ASUS Formal, which former ASUS President John Andrew Pankiw-Petty attributed to poor attendance.Continue...

Wolfe Islanders at crossroads

According to the Ontario Landowner’s Guide to Wind Energy, published by Hearthmakers Energy Cooperative, wind turbines produce a sound that is audible for 250 to 350 metres from the base of the turbine and measures between 35 to 45 dB(A).Continue...

Winds of change blowing on Wolfe Island

During the many years Ian Baines, Sci ’74, spent knocking on doors seeking financial and political support for his renewable energy initiatives, he got used to a particular reaction from government and business staff.Continue...

The parties’ stances on education

Elections are often like an auction, where the most votes go to the highest-bidding candidate. To evaluate this year’s bids, the Journal spoke to representatives of four of the parties and analyzed their platforms to gauge what each has to offer the youngest voting demographic.Continue...

Walker: ‘Everybody should be represented’

Next Monday, Karl Eric Walker wants you to vote for the lone wolf.

The only candidate in Kingston and the Islands running as an independent, Walker said he wants to send a message to the candidates campaigning as members of political parties.Continue...

Walton: hare gaining on the tortoise

Eric Walton, the Green Party candidate for Kingston and the Islands, thinks Queen’s students have an important role to play in the Jan. 23 election. After being born in Ottawa and spending his formative years in various locales across Europe, the Middle East and Asia, Walton came to Kingston in 1978 to study at the University, and he hasn’t looked back since.Continue...

Rogers: sovereign Canada paramount

Although Canadian Action Party (CAP) candidate Don Rogers could be considered a long shot to become the MP for Kingston and the Islands, the long-time politician has overcome similar obstacles before.Continue...

Milliken: Speaker seeking sixth term

Heading into the election that could return him to Parliament for a sixth term, incumbent Liberal MP and Speaker of the House Peter Milliken is campaigning as a self-described voice of experience.
Milliken has been involved with politics since high school, when he volunteered on Liberal Edgar J. Benson’s 1963 re-election campaign and was impressed enough to later join the party.Continue...

Hutchison: seeking a fair society

Rob Hutchison, the NDP candidate for Kingston and the Islands, said he stepped into the political arena because he is looking to promote both change and hope.
A graduate of Queen’s and St. Lawrence College and a long-time Kingston resident, Hutchison has been active in a number of organizations advocating social change, including the Kingston Global Community Centre, Pollution Probe and the Kingston Not-For-Profit Advisory Group. He has worked for Kingston Cooperative Housing Inc. for more than 15 years.Continue...

Grimshaw: a different perspective

Conservative candidate Lou Grimshaw thinks he brings a different perspective to the issues raised in this election campaign, thanks in large part to the 40 years he spent as a professional officer in the Canadian Army.Continue...

Canada’s Chief Justice lays down the law

All human beings are intrinsically worthy of respect, simply because they are human beings—that was the message the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada had for a standing-room-only crowd in Dunning Auditorium last Thursday.Continue...

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