Features Archive: 2009

Resting easy?

When Shakespeare called sleep “nature’s soft nurse,” he was right about the restorative effects of a phenomenon often given a low priority in students’ busy lives.

According to Dr. Suzanne Billing, medical director at Queen’s Health, Counselling and Disability Services, sleep is a mysterious but necessary phenomenon.Continue...

Clearing a path to the final

Offensive linemen might play the least-heralded position in football.
Other offensive players get to handle the ball. Defensive linemen have the glory of sacking the quarterback once in awhile and defensive backs have the allure of potentially intercepting the ball.Continue...

Walking with Woolf

Principal Daniel Woolf likes to use his Twitter account to keep students up to date on what he’s up to, whether he’s in his office, at the airport or a Gaels’ football game. But I learned far more spending last Thursday with him than I could fit into 140 characters.Continue...

Legion keeps veterans’ memories alive

Canadians all over the country took time on Wednesday to remember the service and sacrifices of war veterans.

To Kingston area veterans, the Royal Canadian Legion’s Remembrance Day service was their time to honour the day with their fellow men in arms and their supporters.Continue...

A home for Queen’s rarest tomes

Beyond the Queen’s University Library’s impressive general collection, it houses an equally impressive Special Collections section.

Located on the second floor of Douglas Library, The W.D. Jordan Special Collections Library contains 125,000 volumes of printed material from deerskin-bound bibles to recently published special editions of classic works accumulated since its establishment in 1964.Continue...

Film schools students on education

Knowing Michael MacMillan’s background as a Queen’s film alumnus, I couldn’t think of a better place than the Film House to interview the former Alliance Atlantis executive chairman, who was in town this week as this year’s Brockington Visitor.Continue...

History of a blind spot

When I first contact Marc Epprecht for an interview, he defers for a week. “I’m in Tanzania at the moment,” he said in an email to the Journal.

Epprecht, a professor with Queen’s development studies and history departments, was granted the Desmond Tutu Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Study of Sexuality in Africa in October of this year.Continue...

Pro-bonus for small businesses

Kingston-area small-business owners now have access to pro-bono legal counsel thanks to a new program officially launched in September by the Faculty of Law.

“We try to help those who normally wouldn’t be able to budget their businesses,” program director Peter Kissick said.Continue...

Whose poutine reigns supreme?

At Bubba’s Pizzeria, one thing is certain: poutine is king.

“Poutine is stencilled on the windows here, our shirts, our hats, people love the poutine,” Bubba’s employee Scott Cooper said.Continue...

Feelings mixed about student drinking

Like many university students, Justin Lum, ArtSci ’10, found his first year at Queen’s revolved heavily around the consumption of alcohol.

“Prior to coming to university, I never drank heavily. When I got here I sort of went on a binge,” he said, adding that he sometimes went out five nights in a week his first year.Continue...

Recession Studies

The school year has hardly begun, but graduating students are already thinking about their post-graduate ambitions. When they sweep off Grant Hall’s stage this spring, diplomas in hand, the class of 2010 will be met with the harshest economic climate since the early 1990s.Continue...

Tale of a pub: Clark Hall’s progress

This month marks the one-year anniversary of Clark Hall Pub’s re-opening.

Walking into the pub last week to speak with Engineering Society representatives and having attended last year’s grand opening, I couldn’t believe the difference a year can make.Continue...

The single-sex dorm debate

Twenty-eight years after Queen’s University was established, its doors opened to female students in 1869.

Ban Righ Hall, the first female residence on campus, was built in 1925. But as early as 1900, members of the Alumnae Association rented housing near campus and used it to house women.Continue...

Golden Hawk helps history take flight

Sitting in the cockpit of a shining golden Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) F-86 Sabre 5, I did what anyone else would do. I started fiddling with the dials hoping for something exciting to happen.

Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Dan Dempsey, a Royal Military College graduate with more than 20 years of RCAF service under his belt, showed me around the Golden Hawk, pointing out the features of the 1954 aircraft and keeping me away from others. Like, say, the eject button.Continue...

QPID shoots for projects close to home

When most students think of Clark Hall, they probably think of Friday afternoon Rituals, Golden Words and maybe the Campus Bookstore. Fewer are likely aware the same hallowed halls that house one of Queen’s favorite watering holes are also home to one of the only entirely student-run, non-profit non-governmental, organizations in Canada.Continue...

If X, then Y the gender gap?

It’s no secret women outnumber men at the university level in Canada, and Queen’s is no exception. A quick walk around campus will show this fact, and the statistics will back it up.Continue...

So... what’s cultural studies?

The cultural studies program may be a work in progress, but it wouldn’t rather be anything else. Thanks to provincial government funding and faculty pressure, students interested in culture have have found a true niche at Queen’s. This year marks the program’s addition to the school’s graduate calendar.Continue...

Healthy science

According to the Canadian guidelines for exercise, a leisurely 50-minute walk may be as beneficial to your health as a 30-minute run.

Though I wish I’d read the guidelines before embarrassing myself on the treadmill at the PEC, Robert Ross, an exercise physiologist with the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, said my dreams of walking my way to a wan waist have yet to be empirically supported.Continue...

Progressing Conservatives

“If you’re not a liberal at 20 you have no heart; if you’re not a conservative at 40 you have no brain.” This adage, attributed to Winston Churchill, paints a picture of the fickle nature of politics, but also reinforces a familiar stereotype: the hardened, cold-hearted young conservative, the miserly antithesis to a more idealistic liberal youth majority.Continue...

Working to bridge the town-gown gap

When retired civil engineering professor Barry Batchelor moved his family to Collingwood St. from Kingston’s suburban fringe in 1984, most of his neighbours were of the full-time variety—many of them families with young children.Continue...

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