Lifestyle Archive: 2007

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 23.Continue...

The earth-loving chemical engineer

When Bryon McConnell, Sci ’93 and MSc ’95, came to Queen’s with a love of the environment, he had no idea he would end up working for the Department of National Defence.

McConnell pursued a degree in chemical engineering because he wanted to acquire the skills to affect environmental change.Continue...

How to navigate the literary life

The artistic life is as unique as those who pursue it. But, it takes a lot of talent, not to mention perseverance, to survive as a writer these days.

Frugal habits, travel, self-discipline and reining in late-night creativity to work during daylight hours are all part of the life of Steven Heighton, ArtSci ’84 and MA ’86. Author of the bestselling The Shadow Boxer, Afterlands and the Governer General’s Award nominated collection of poems The Ecstasy of Skeptics, among other works, Heighton knew from a young age he was drawn to the arts.Continue...

How to snag your dream job

With the semester winding down, it’s time to start thinking about will happen after those not-so-distant April exams. Whether this spring will find you searching for a summer job or looking for a start in the career of your dreams, how you go about your job search will have a major affect on its outcome.

Because every job brings you one step closer to your ultimate career dream, the Journal has put together 10 ways for you to get a leg up on the competition.Continue...

From notebooks to cookbooks

Food-lover Dana McCauley, Arts ’89, was once just like any other Queen’s student. She worked as a student constable and wrote for the Journal before graduating with an English degree. Almost 20 years later, she’s one of Canada’s foremost foodies and president of Dana McCauley and Associates Ltd.Continue...

Negotiating an evolving job market

With the job market and employers’ expectations changing daily, your best asset upon entering the market is the ability to roll with the changes.

Kathy Harris, owner of Jobmatics, a Canadian career-consulting firm, said in order to take advantage of the job market, you need to be skilled not just in your specific field, but in the world of technology.
Harris said the pace of change has reached a point where the employers themselves can’t pinpoint what exactly they should be looking for in prospective employees.Continue...

The value of a good reputation

Maclean’s magazine released the full results of its 2007 University rankings on Nov. 19. Tied with the University of British Columbia, Queen’s in second place overall in the Medical Doctoral category of Canadian Universities.

Maclean’s rankings claim to act as a measure of the overall undergraduate experience. The magazine’s website says the information used to create their rankings is gathered from three national surveys in which over 70,000 Canadian university students participated.Continue...

Everything will work itself out

With experience moving through many different sectors of the job market and getting a late start on his current career choice, Career Counsellor Paul Bowman can empathize when students come to him unsure about their career path.

Bowman, Sci ’86, has followed an unconventional career path since graduating from Queen’s. He has worked in fields ranging from engineering to adult education.Continue...

The peoples’ poetry press

Turning lemons into lemonade is old news for Molle O’Dolan, ArtSci ’11. O’Dolan used one publisher’s refusal as motivation to start her own publishing company.

In her first year of a women’s and religious studies degree at Queen’s, O’Dolan already has a diploma in web design from Seneca College. She’s also working on a diploma in conflict analysis from Royal Roads University and a diploma for addiction management from McMaster University. O’Dolan grew up in Toronto and was an avid writer throughout high school.Continue...

Taking time to master grad school

During her four years as a biology major, Leah Winters, ArtSci ’08, made it through countless due dates, lectures and exams. Now she faces her toughest assignment yet.
Finding a job is one of her options, Winters said, but she’s wary about making the jump from school to the workforce just yet. In 2004, more than 31,600 students in Canada received a master’s level qualification, a nine per cent increase from the previous year and the seventh consecutive annual increase. That year, for the first time, master’s level qualifications represented more than 15 per cent of all qualifications awarded.

This is good news for Shelly Aylesworth-Spink, the director of the office of Dean in the School of Queen’s Graduate Studies and Research. She hopes to see Queen’s program grow.Continue...

Brains and brawn

Queen’s students unsure of which degree to pursue or whether they made the right choice are in good company with Queen’s alumnus Jock Climie, ArtSci ’89 and Law ’94. Climie, a former pro athlete and current lawyer and TSN broadcaster, was uncertain about his career path when he first got to Queen’s. Climie said his original plan to go into medicine vanished after he looked at the courses he would have to take.Continue...

Careers Supplement

What do future career paths hold for Queen's students? The Journal investigates the merits of grad school, taking advantage of the Queen's reputation, and how to snag your dream job.Continue...

’Tis the season to decorate

It’s almost December and people are beginning to deck the halls, bringing out star-topped trees for Christmas, Hanukkiahs for Hanukkah and colourful African art for Kwanzaa. For many faiths, this is the season to celebrate and the season to decorate. That means tinsel, candles and colour: even Festivus has a pole.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 22.Continue...

Word Nerd

In 2003, when the French government opposed the American war on Iraq, certain areas of the United States exploded with anti-French sentiment. The most amusing legacy of this political clash is the renaming of French toast and French fries to “freedom toast” and “freedom fries.” Claimed to be a protest against France’s stance, the small culinary admonishment attracted a wide variety of media attention and the incident quickly became the subject of international criticism and ridicule. This is not, however, a unique incident. “Freedom fries” belong to a longstanding tradition of words used throughout history to make political statements.Continue...

Rise and shine

The world is divided into two kinds of people: early risers and night hawks. Have you ever wondered what it’s like on the other side?Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 21.Continue...

The nomenclature of you

As Shakespeare’s renowned heroine Juliet asked, “What’s in a name?” We often take names for granted, never thinking about what they might mean. But if you could choose your name, you might put a little more thought into those words on your birth certificate.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 20.Continue...

A toast to cocktails

Ordering his signature martini, James Bond requested his drink to be “shaken, not stirred.”Continue...

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