Lifestyle Archive: 2008

Galen Eye Centre

The Clockmaker

Ice chips on his tongue. The morphine drip takes him elsewhere—to Warsaw, the sea, to women she wishes hadn’t existed for him—and he cries and twists in his bed.Continue...

Issue in Photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 38.Continue...

Three. Two. One.

You’d be amazed what you can remember in a few seconds.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 37.Continue...

Keeping tabs on personal data

For Queen’s professor David Lyon, keeping an eye on things is a way of life.
Lyon’s the director of the Surveillance Project, an interdisciplinary and international research initiative based at Queen’s. He said the project researches everything from personal data stored by Facebook, national ID systems and biometric passports, which use data such as fingerprints to identify people.Continue...

Looking for a little forgiveness

In the aftermath of Sept. 11, 2001, Queen’s professor Jill Scott began seeking forgiveness.Continue...

Who owns your research?

A few years ago, Stephen Brown had an idea. After seven people died and hundreds fell ill from drinking water contaminated with E.coli bacteria in Walkerton, ON, Brown and his co-researchers came up with a plan to make the new bacteria-detection systems they had been working on available to the public.Continue...

Challenging the laws of physics

Reinventing antiquated theories is physics professor Art McDonald’s bread and butter.

McDonald said most of his work is done at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory’s lab located two kilometres underground in an active nickel mine near Sudbury. The observatory’s $100-million project has put McDonald on the map.Continue...

An atmospheric science experiment

So maybe you didn’t get that research grant, or the equipment in your kitchen just isn’t up to the science lab standards, but chances are there’s still hope for your dreams of experimental glory.

The Journal presents a do-it-yourself science experiment to test your house’s air quality, proving that at-home science is more than just a baking soda and vinegar volcano.Continue...

Let’s talk about research

As Queen’s Vice-Principal of Research, Chair of the Board of PARTEQ Innovations Inc. and a civil engineering professor, Kerry Rowe is a busy man. His own research has been recognized with several awards and he has been honoured for his outstanding teaching.Continue...

The ins and outs of ethics

Before researchers begin their work it’s important they understand the ethical implications and how to ensure the ethical treatment of their subjects, said Laura-Lee Balkwill, ethics education and compliance advisor at the University’s Office of Research Services.Continue...

Where funding comes from

Last year, Queen’s received $30.4 million in research funding from corporate sponsors—17.8 per cent of total research funding at the University that year. For Arthur Schafer, a philosophy professor and director of the Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics at the University of Manitoba, that’s $30.4 million too much.Continue...

Research Supplement

The Journal looks into issues in research, featuring stories on research ethics, a DIY air-quality test, and managing intellectual property.Continue...

Kay’s Work

In high school biology, my class experimented on the frog’s heart. Rana pipiens . Mrs. Mangan forced me to put the hook through a millimetre of heart muscle, tie it to a string and connect the string to a machine that drew squiggled lines on paper.Continue...

Issue in Photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 36.Continue...

Shifty semantics

There’s a fairly well known brainteaser told by word nerds throughout the English-speaking world. The story goes that in 17th century London, England, when damage to Saint Paul’s Cathedral in was repaired, the monarch overseeing the repairs called the new architecture “amusing, awful and artificial.”Continue...

What’s luck got to do with it?

You may not believe in leprechauns or pots of gold, but chances are you’ve received a blessing from someone you don’t even know after a sneeze.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 35.Continue...

Sizing up your carbon footprint

A few years back, a man with a mild southern accent and an oversized black suit introduced himself as the once-almost president of the United States and presented the first picture ever taken of the Earth in an attempt to get the message out about the dangers of carbon dioxide.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 34.Continue...

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