Lifestyle Archive: 2008

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 28.Continue...

Morning-after elixirs and quick-fixers

If you’ve ever shown up at Stooley’s on a Sunday morning wearing a big pair of sunglasses and demanding a Red Eye from the bartender, you already know the meaning of the word hangover.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 27.Continue...

The message of a new generation

Y do we luv 2 txt msg?Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 26.Continue...

Guide to catching a publisher’s eye

For writers trying to get published, the process of submitting manuscripts can be long and frustrating. That said, the legend of Agatha Christie is that her first novel was rejected 19 times before being published in 1920. Whether the number has been exaggerated or not, it’s nice to know that even the best-selling novelist of all-time had to work at being published.Continue...

A prize-winning, northern read

Picture this: a CBC Radio station, mid-70s, Yellowknife. Your First impression upon reading the cover may be something like this: very Canadian and possibly yawn inducing.

Thankfully, in the hands of Elizabeth Hay—herself an ex-Yellowknife resident working for CBC—this year’s Giller Prize winner escapes this tragic fate and rises above predictability to become an earnest tale of self-discovery and love.Continue...

The truth about translations

From Victor Hugo’s Les Misèrables to Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s 100 Years of Solitude to Homer’s Odyssey, some of the most widely read works of literature have been translated into numerous languages. But a lot of the original meaning may be lost in translation, said Classics Professor Erez Natanblut.Continue...

When books become films

If you’ve ever had to read a 700-page novel in a week packed with classes, work, extracurricular activities and the other niceties of university life, the thought of renting the tome’s film adaptation can be tempting.Continue...

Poems

Poems by Carly Watters, Rosel Kim, Lara Szabo-Greisman and Adèle BarclayContinue...

Aspiring writers given a mentor

While the smell of overcooked veggies may not inspire your inner poet, Queen’s writer-in-residence Billeh Nickerson started out reciting his poetry to friends during high school lunch hours spent in the cafeteria.

Nickerson has come a long way since then and is now an important voice in Canadian poetry, with a special focus on queer issues.Continue...

Books for all seasons and spaces

Journal staff reflect on their favourite seasonal reads and why they’re perfect for certain times of year.Continue...

Books tiptoe into the digital age

On Nov. 19, 2007, Amazon.com released the Kindle: a wireless, battery operated reading device that Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon, said will have readers going beyond the physical book.

Amazon’s Kindle is the latest attempt in a long line of digital books—the literary equivalent of the iPod. Though Sony, Bookeen, and even Apple offer similar products, the Kindle is unique in its ability to purchase and download books that can be read anywhere.Continue...

Criticism doesn’t equal critical

Stereotypes depict them as eccentric individuals, hunched over a desk overflowing with papers and books, copious notes scribbled in the margins. But Maggie Berg contends that, to some degree, everyone’s a literary critic.Continue...

Literary Supplement

The Journal takes a look into the future of the book, books for all seasons, and how to get published.Continue...

Kids don’t hold board game monopoly

Walking into Minotaur’s games night will dissolve all your illusions of board games as child’s play. With no Candyland or Chutes and Ladders boards to be seen, groups of adults and teens gather around tables, engrossed in strategic card games, three-dimensional building sets or maps plotted with armies for world domination.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 25.Continue...

Playing games with your mind

Parents have spent decades telling their kids that TV and video games will fry their brains. But recently, companies such as Nintendo are trying to turn the “bad for your brain” stereotype around.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 135, issue 24.Continue...

A bittersweet chocolate debate

Over the past couple weeks you might have found yourself indulging in some tasty holiday season leftovers, but don’t be too hard on yourself—some research says rich and creamy chocolate treats might be better for you than you thought.Continue...

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