Lifestyle Archive: 2009

Galen Eye Centre

The ultimate business jargon cheat sheet

The Journal deciphers those fancy economics and finance terms in the business section with this fun guideContinue...

Crouching tiger, hidden opportunity

For decades, the West has profited from attracting talented workers from around the world. But many Asian, Middle Eastern and South American economies are experiencing growth rates unfathomable in the developed world, a phenomenon that has prompted many young university graduates to travel east to seek their fortune.Continue...

Queen’s tries to make a buck

In 2007-08, the Queen’s Advancement office had their most successful year ever, receiving over $65 million in alumni donations, including a $17 million Rembrandt painting from distinguished alumnus Alfred Bader.

That all changed last fall, as the downturn in stock markets sent alumni donors into total financial retreat, chief advancement officer, Jennifer Marr said.Continue...

Dodge talks downturn

David Dodge had his fair share of experience with crises.

There’s something peculiarly fated about Dodge’s stint as Governor of the Bank of Canada. When he took office in 2001, most of North America was struggling with the aftermath of the Dot-Com Boom and stock markets had taken a nosedive.Continue...

Taking business advice from Aristotle

The sight of the well-groomed businessperson heading into a courtroom is too familiar to us all. Many have been conned by a few greedy people at the top, from deceitful CEOs to dubious informants.

Queen’s School of Business is actively responding to scandals in the headlines by promoting business ethics courses.Continue...

The good old days will return

If Jeff Rubin is right, you can say goodbye to Atlantic salmon and Florida oranges in the wintertime—at least for the foreseeable future.

For nearly two decades before stepping down earlier this year, Rubin was the CIBC World Markets chief economist. He has become known for accurately predicting fluctuations in the Canadian dollar, interest rates and trends in the real estate market.Continue...

Crisis in the classroom

From taking out mortgages that couldn’t be repaid and trading assets that were barely understood in the last few years, it seems many people didn’t know what they were doing with their money.

The rampant borrowing and risk-taking that brought about the financial meltdown of 2008 has some arguing Canadians aren’t adequately educated in finance.Continue...

No hiding in grad school here, we have a plan

Planning what comes next after graduation has always been tough, but stepping out into the real world in the midst of a recession poses a new group of challenges.

With companies downsizing all over the country, fewer jobs are available to recent graduates with little work experience in their chosen fields.Continue...

Economic bubble shields Kingston businesses

As store owners sit idly by and public workers grapple with budget cuts all over Southern Ontario, Kingston may have found a way to remain relatively impervious to the economic downturn gripping the world.

With its thriving military, health care, correctional and educational, Kingston’s economy is supported and generally faring quite well, director of Kingston Economic Development Corporation’s John-Paul Shearer said.Continue...

The New Economy

A special publication of the JournalContinue...

Don’t flip out, it’s just a game

The ancient Greeks left a legacy of architecture, mythology, philosophy and science, but their myriad of accomplishments left another legacy—one of drinking games.

One of the earliest references to drinking games is in Plato’s Symposium—translated as the Drinking Party.Continue...

Issue in Photos

View all images from vol. 137, issue 8.Continue...

The science behind Scientology

Since widely popularizing Scientology in the early 1990s, celebrities like Tom Cruise and John Travolta have worked hard to bring the belief system into the spotlight. Despite the existence of over 700 Scientology centres worldwide, it continues to be shrouded in controversy and isn’t recognized as an official religion in many countries—including Canada. IContinue...

Aberdeen Street Photo Gallery

Photos from the Aberdeen Street party.Continue...

Issue in Photos

View all images from vol. 137, issue 8.Continue...

Catwomen return to the big screen

In ancient Egyptian culture, the cat was worshipped. In the event of a fire, the men of the household would guard the fire to protect their cats from running into the flame. The historian Herodotus also documented that when a family’s cat died, the entire family would engage in a process of mourning, often even shaving their own eyebrows to commemorate their loss.Continue...

Issue in Photos

View all images from vol. 137, issue 7.Continue...

What’s MRI got to do with it?

The course of love never did run smooth. It consists of raging chemicals: estrogen and testosterone, as well as dangerously high levels of dopamine and serotonin.

There is, however, a method to this madness.Continue...

Issue in Photos

View all images from vol. 137, issue 6.Continue...

The great search engine that could

It’s a multilingual, ever-expanding fountain of knowledge, able to spout the biography of Mrs. Ari Gold, the manifesto of the People’s Union of Estonia and the complete discography of the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Dubbed “the free encyclopedia,” Wikipedia has become the seminal go-to source for curious Internet surfers looking for a quick answer since its launch in January 2001. It’s omniscient—almost.Continue...

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