Lifestyle Archive: 2010

Galen Eye Centre

Last Words

Some parting words from this year's Editors in ChiefContinue...

Metric online gallery

Photos of Metric and the ArkellsContinue...

Issue in Photos

View all images from volume 137 issue 40.Continue...

How to fight systemic oppression at Queen’s

This piece isn’t for you if you walk around vomiting privilege in every direction. It isn’t for you if you dismiss the oppression of real people as mere anecdotal evidence and claim it’s insufficient to draw conclusions from. We’ve written to you, reasoned with you, and spoken in cafés with you.Continue...

Time, space and education

It takes time to think things through and it takes a space to think in. These elementary observations draw attention to the unusual portion of time and space that a university carves out, and to the opportunities we’re afforded by it. It’s not at all trivial to ask what, in a wide sense, can justify the existence of these opportunities, given that they’re essentially propped up and funded by many people who don’t share in them.Continue...

Opening up to the world

When I was being recruited, Queen’s University was pitched as the “Harvard of the North.” There are many very smart people at Queen’s with a lot of good ideas.

With these intellectual gifts come responsibilities—one of which is to share our research, teaching and learning as much as possible.

I therefore propose that we take four steps to open Queen’s up to the world.Continue...

Innovative teaching methods in an era of cuts

Here’s the challenge: How do we maintain the quality of education in the face of ongoing financial cuts? I’m inclined to say it’s impossible.

I share with other faculty a deep frustration that although I’m working as hard as ever (or perhaps even harder) I’m not able to do my job as well as I once didContinue...

The economics of our education

When I joined the Queen’s Economics Department (QED) as an assistant professor many years ago we had about 10 sections of first-year economics with 60 to 70 students in each. Assessment was based on written assignments and exams marked by the professors. This coming year, we will have three sections of about 450 students each. The professor will wear a microphone to be heard in a large auditorium, and at least 80 per cent of the assessment will be based on multiple-choice exams.Continue...

Reconnecting with campus media

An interesting thing happened on Queen’s campus in 2008. If you were a student then, you’d likely remember the controversy about former ASUS President Jacob Mantle. I don’t know him, I wasn’t there and I haven’t read every stitch of coverage. But regardless of your position on the issue, it was an interesting chapter in the digital history of the University.Continue...

Queen’s must rise to its artistic reputation

What makes Kingston livable aside from comparatively affordable housing, safe neighbourhoods and being a node on a transportation corridor? To live in Upper Canada’s former capital is to be a quick trip to the many allures of Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto.Continue...

We’re here, we’re queer ... now what?

In a small town about 30 minutes northwest of Belleville lies Campbellford, my hometown.

I had to wait a long time to feel like I could be open about my sexual identity after coming out to myself just a month shy of turning 13. There wasn’t much going on with queer issues in my town at the time (and now). Needless to say, when I came to Queen’s I was ready to be out, proud and loud about who I am.Continue...

Coming out on accessibility issues

I’m writing about the significance of coming out at Queen’s as a student with a disability. This process of self-identification is both positive and negative.

First, let me cover some ground. I’m profoundly deaf, yet hear with the assistance of a cochlear implant.Continue...

Finding guarded optimism

At this time of year the academic community—students, faculty and staff—typically finds that its horizons have closed in unnaturally.

For students the focus must be preparing for exams; for faculty it’s marking the last assignment that commands attention, or perhaps drafting and grading exams; for staff, to conclude the year involves superhuman efforts on many fronts, often under pressure from unrealistic deadlines.Continue...

Less labelling, more dialogue needed

Some of the most often heard phrases are also the most misused.

Perhaps the most used phrase that I’ve heard in my time at Queen’s is the notion of the “Queen’s community.” What does it mean?Continue...

Student activism key to fighting budget cuts

In my fourth year at Queen’s, I arrived back at school to the sights and sounds of a campus coming alive with students. A week later, I arrived at my first class to hear my professor say a particular interdisciplinary course wasn’t held that year because it was unaffordable.Continue...

Cathal

I got home Wednesday evening. Killian mentioned there was a message from Cathal.

“Nothing specific,” he said when I asked him what it was about. I was hungry and tired but pulled my boots back on and stepped out into the December snow. The sky was littered with stars where a half hour previous it had been oozing pink clouds.Continue...

Issue in Photos

View all images from volume 137 issue 39.Continue...

The curator

Sophie gazed at the sculpture for perhaps the fourth or fifth minute in a row, quite obviously deep in thought. To any passerby, Sophie was contemplating the artist’s subtle message nestled among the clever curves and ribbons of shiny copper. Was there a social criticism? Or perhaps it was the bitter, metallic taste of revenge?Continue...

Slammed! By Catriona Ward Sell


“I’m Harry Giles. And I hate my cock.”
The words which heralded my entrance into slam poetry were certainly memorable. Encouraged by St Andrews University’s creative writing club to...Continue...

Out on the town

A photo gallery of supplemental Arts & Entertainment images from issue 38.Continue...

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