News Archive: 2005

News In Brief

Liberal MPP for Kingston and the Islands John Gerretsen has been named one of three candidates for the Lord of the Slums award by Toronto’s Parkdale Tenants Association.

In his official cabinet position as Ontario municipal affairs and housing minister, the Association says, he is responsible—along with Toronto Mayor David Miller and Toronto Community Housing Corp. President Derek Ballantyne—for the “slumification” and “ghettoization” of Toronto.Continue...

Campus rallies to support Grad Club

Undergrads, graduate students, faculty and staff packed The Grad Club Nov. 24 to collectively voice their support for the popular campus hangout.

Members of the Law Students’ Society hosted the “Save The Grad Club” party and fundraiser to show support for the campus bar and circulate a petition opposing current proposals by the Union Street Project, which calls for the demolition of whole or part of The Grad Club’s building.Continue...

JComm rules on second AAA case

A student was found guilty of violating the All Ages Access (AAA) policy when she forgot to retrieve her student card from a charity event in early November.

Last Thursday, the Judicial Committee (JComm) met to decide the matter of AMS vs. Kelsea Fitzpatrick, Sci ’09. Alvin Tedjo was the StuCon on duty at the exit door at the time Fitzpatrick left the bar.

Tedjo said at the hearing that he was not more than two or three feet from the exit door at any time.Continue...

Exemption sought from information act

A proposed amendment to a provincial government bill may mean students could be refused access to information from University meetings where decisions and deliberations are made. Administrators, however, say new legislation won’t reduce the transparency of Queen’s existing freedom of information policies.Continue...

Culinary makeover for Vic common room

It’s for students like Catherine Payne, Comm ’09, that a new food and entertainment facility has been proposed for the lower common room in Victoria Hall. Payne, who lives on main campus, said that although she doesn’t plan on living in residence next year when the facility is scheduled to open, she thinks it’s a neat idea. The project, slated for groundbreaking on May 1 and opening next September, is currently in the design stages.Continue...

Race, racism and blackface

When trying to decide on a university, Kareena Elliston, ArtSci ’06, said she was warned by her high school teachers and counsellors against choosing Queen’s. Elliston said it wasn’t long before she encountered racist attitudes during her first year.

“One student told me I ‘wasn’t really black,’” she said. Elliston said one student’s recent Halloween costume is another example of racism on campus.Continue...

Date rape drugs hit home

Through the darkness, the only thing Alexandra recalls is someone shouting. When Alexandra opened her eyes around 9 a.m., she felt dizzy and disoriented. Her vision was blurred, but her eyes eventually adjusted. Six thin, silver needles protruded from the tops of her hands and the soft flesh of her wrists and inner arms. Small tubes, connected to the needles, ran up and away into plastic, fluid-filled sacks. Then Alexandra realized she wasn’t wearing her own clothes.Continue...

Campus gears up for federal election

On Monday evening, a non-confidence motion passed in the House of Commons, officially beginning a federal election campaign. Only 17 months after the last federal election, candidates and politically-minded students alike are gearing up for the longest federal election campaign in more than two decades.

The timing of this campaign, which will span the holiday season, has been criticized by some observers.Continue...

What to do about Aberdeen?

There is a foolproof and easy solution to the Aberdeen Street Party: simply arrange for a torrential, frigid downpour to begin at 8 p.m. on Homecoming and last until 5 a.m. the following morning.

Barring this, however, there are no simple ways of preventing a repeat of the chaos and violence that marred this year’s Homecoming. We learned this lesson last month. Despite a year of preparation and consultation between the AMS, Kingston Police and the University, despite the heavy police presence and the well-attended alternate event, our efforts failed.Continue...

Debaters talk their way to the top

Opposing the use of televised rugby games in New Zealand churches to attract parishioners helped Aron Seal, a masters candidate in economics and Jim Nicholson, ArtSci ’05, bring home the top prize from the Central Canadian Debating Championships last weekend.

Seal, who also won the Top Speaker award and Nicholson comprised one of the six Queen’s teams that competed at the University of Western Ontario.Continue...

Vigil remembers victims of violence

Queen’s students and community members gathered outside Grant Hall Monday evening for a candlelight vigil for Transgender Day of Remembrance.

Huddling in a circle holding flickering white candles, 34 people paid tribute to individuals who were slain as a result of anti-transgender hatred or prejudice in the past year.

The event was organized by the Education on Queer Issues Project (EQuIP), a group within the AMS Social Issues Commission that is dedicated to lobbying for and educating the public about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights.Continue...

Student speaker named champ at Winter Fair

Eric Dalke, ArtSci ’09, knows what it means to be part of a consumer-driven economy.

At home on his family farm in Morden, Man., Dalke experienced firsthand the effect on farmers of the public’s perception of food quality.
Dalke said that when the crisis hit, shoppers became distrustful of the products in their grocery stores, making it very difficult for cattle farmers to export their beef.Continue...

Salmonella poisoning cases sprout up among students

Several Queen’s students have reportedly been suffering from salmonella poisoning after eating contaminated bean sprouts in the last two weeks.

Public health officials have issued a warning to the public to avoid eating the vegetable, which has affected 15 Kingston-area residents, including an undisclosed number of students.Continue...

Bartender to pedal across Africa

Grad Club bartender Michael Coo won’t have to brave winter in Kingston this year. Instead, the “forty-something” father of two will spend the next five months riding his bike across Africa to raise money for the charity WaterCan.

Coo, an avid traveler, will participate in the fourth annual Tour D’Afrique, a race and expedition that stretches over 12,000 kilometers of African terrain.Continue...

Hitchcock talks with student leaders

There was tension in the air at Wallace Hall on Monday, as Principal Karen Hitchcock met with students to discuss how they can improve relations with the Kingston community in the aftermath of the unsanctioned Aberdeen Street party.

The approximately 25 students who attended the meeting received an e-mail invitation from Hitchcock. According to the Principal’s Office, approximately 350 students were invited because of their positions of leadership with student government, faculty societies, clubs, DSCs, intramurals or intercollegiate sports.Continue...

SGPS opposes Code of Conduct enforcement off campus

The Society of Graduate and Professional Students (SGPS) has challenged the application of non-academic discipline for students who break the Queen’s Code of Conduct while they are off campus and not officially representing the University.Continue...

Christmas charity causes controversy

Concerns raised last year about the religious affiliation of Operation Christmas Child—a charity that sends boxes of presents to children in developing countries—has prompted the AMS to stop distributing the boxes on campus this year.
However, the boxes appeared once again on campus after a group of students in a Commerce course approached Residence Life (ResLife) about helping to publicize and distribute the boxes. The group said they knew of the charity’s evangelical affiliations, but didn’t perceive a potential for students to be unwilling to participate because of that fact.Continue...

ASUS budget reports $26,403 loss

Some members of the Arts and Science Undergraduate Society (ASUS) Assembly are calling for increased financial accountability measures after last year’s budget revealed a net loss of $26,403.

According to the 2004-05 budget, ASUS lost approximately $30,000 on the ArtSci formal, and attributed more than $1,500 to miscellaneous expenditures. ASUS also made about $500 from faculty jacket sales, which have garnered more than $5,000 for each of the past two years, and was expected to make $8,000.Continue...

News In Brief

The Nursing Science Society will install a new president and vice-president next Thursday.

Nathan Duyck, Nurs ’07, and Alex Harris, Nurs ’08, were notified on Nov. 10 of their acclamation as president and vice-president, respectively. Each was required to collect 10 nomination signatures from nursing students.Continue...

Hogg named new CFO

The University has hired its first-ever Chief Financial Officer and Associate Vice Principal (Finance), Daniel Hogg, who reported to work for the first time on Monday. Andrew Simpson, vice-principal (operations and finance) said the key reason the new position was created was to merge the many aspects of financial management at the University.Continue...

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