News Archive: 2006

OISE Open House

News In Brief

On Saturday, Nov. 18, Michael Urban, ArtSci ’06, became the 54th Queen’s graduate to be awarded
the Rhodes Scholarship ...Continue...

Computing for beginners

Have you ever wondered if your Facebook profile can get you in trouble? If you can fund your education playing online poker? How Google works? A new class to be offered by the School of Computing in the winter term seeks to help students answer these fundamental questions.Continue...

Students take the plunge for shelter

With the theme, “Get Cold to Keep Others Warm,” the Queen’s Helping Hand Association’s
Polar Bear Dip Fundraiser for the Ryandale Shelter for the Homeless took place last Saturday at 2 p.m.Continue...

On the road with the Queen’s Greens

Volunteers from Vancouver to Charlottetown poured in and out of a London, Ont., office building last week, trying to prepare to send the first Green Party candidate to Ottawa. The Queen’s Greens were there, and a Journal reporter accompanied them.Continue...

Carleton may go pro-choice

The Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA ), put forth a motion last week to not recognize
student groups on campus that oppose abortion. The motion states that CUSA respects abortion rights,
and that organizations that oppose abortion won’t be given funding or recognized in the CUSA space.Continue...

Professor sues Queen's for $1M

A professor is suing Queen’s for $1 million while still working for the University, the Journal has learned. Dr. David Strum is seeking damages from the University and Kingston General Hospital for continuing breach of contract; misrepresentation and/or negligent misstatement and/or deceit; constructive wrongful dismissal; defamation; breach of the duty of good faith; and punitive, exemplary and aggravated damages.Continue...

Animal research kept quiet

Queen’s uses a variety of animals for research in medicine, biology, neurosciences and other fields, but won’t disclose how many animals they have, what species they are or where exactly they’re kept.Continue...

Foodbank use down

Visits to the AMS Foodbank have decreased dramatically this year, and AMS Foodbank Manager Tara Tran, ArtSci ’07, is trying to figure out why. Tran said she doesn’t think the decreased use is due to lack of need.Continue...

Two sides of the educational coin

The University Experience Program, which targets students who could be the first in their family to attend university and brings them to Queen’s to introduce them to university life. This program can target students from lower economic backgrounds, but that isn’t its primary motivation.Continue...

News In Brief

Campus Security warned students Tuesday that date rape drugs may have been used in the Queen’s community.Continue...

Students plan Darfur action

Yoni Levitan and Ira Goldstein, ArtSci ’07 and STAND divestment director, are hoping Queen’s will be the first Canadian university to stop doing business with companies providing indirect support to the Sudanese government.Continue...

Remembrance and advocacy

More than 25 students gathered outside Grant Hall Monday evening to mark the eighth annual Trans Day of Remembrance. Held on Nov. 20 of each year, the day is meant to commemorate those who were killed as a result of anti-transgender hate or prejudice.Continue...

Meat-free for a week

As part of an ASUS Committee for the Environment (ACE) event, Joanna Szczepanski joins about 60 students in eating vegetarian food this past week.Continue...

Golden tongues put to the test

Nathaniel Erskine-Smith wins first prize in the 66th Andrina McCulloch Public Speaking Competition.Continue...

Symposium explores identity through treaty law

Much of the discussion at an Aboriginal issues symposium held on Nov. 17 to 19 centered around
land claim issues—something that has been a hot button issue for Kingston since last week’s
confrontation between Tyendinaga Mohawks and Canadian military near Deseronto.Continue...

A lifelong battle against indifference

At first glance, Elie Wiesel looked like a tired, wrinkled old man as he apologized for not being able to
speak any louder. He couldn’t be more wrong.Continue...

The gender gap

According to Statistics Canada, the percentage of female graduates compared to the national total grew from 57.83 per cent in 1996 to 58.55 per cent in 2000 and approximately 60 per cent in 2004. In 1999, 55.77 per cent of the degrees granted were granted to women; in 2005, that number was 56.93 per cent.Continue...

U.S. surveillance a threat to Canadian research

Queen’s won’t be joining other Canadian universities in moving their research away from possible
U.S. government monitoring because its research is already safe from prying eyes.Continue...

Norwalk outbreak cause concern

Outbreaks of the Norwalk virus at Mount Allison University, St. Francis Xavier University and the University of Alberta have prompted Queen’s to take steps to prevent a similar outbreak here. “Most communities will see outbreaks of Norovirus every year,” said Mike Condra, director of Health, Counselling, Disability Services at Queen’s, adding that a few cases are not uncommon at Queen’s.Continue...

‘They wanted to dehumanize us’

At the age 20, Bronka Krygier was not studying for final exams or preparing for a career—she was a survivor of the Warsaw Ghetto and Nazi invasion of Poland. Krygier shared a few of her many experiences from those six years to a packed auditorium in Strirling Hall on Wednesday night.
The speech headlined the annual Holocaust Education Week, organized by Queen’s Hillel.Continue...

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