Arts

Junction create time capsule

After seven years together, the Brampton band has finally released their first full-length album, a self-titled follow-up to 2004’s EP. Inspired by the small-room feel of albums like Nirvana’s In Utero and Pearl Jam’s Vitalogy , the three-piece recorded the album’s instrumentals off the floor in nine days, an intentional departure from the process behind the EP.Continue...

Poet presents mature fable

The Canadian film industry may not have the rich production opportunities or star systems of Hollywood, but every year it manages to produce a few memorable little movies, even if poor distribution prevents most people from seeing them. Canadian filmmakers may have government funding, but the money and audiences just aren’t sufficient to support a substantial industry. Still, the movies are out there—you just have to work a little harder to see them.Continue...

Local Shorts feature penguins, robbers and more

If life worked out as planned, Ashley Hobb would be the next Steven Spielberg; Breean Hougesen would be practicing botany in a biochemistry lab; and Dave Bedrich wouldn’t even be in Kingston. Fortunately for the Local Shorts program, they’ve all been brought together for the Kingston Canadian Film Festival ...Continue...

Artists think inside the box

40x30 is the name, theme and the only request curator Jeremy Mulder had of the artists in The Artel’s current gallery show. An open-ended and open-minded concept, the show brings together the diverse voices of 10 mostly emerging Kingston artists in one room to be expressed in the allotted frame of 40 inches by 30 inches.Continue...

Exclusively Canadian fare

From an Academy Award winner to Degrassi Junior High, the Kingston Canadian Film Festival takes the idea of Canadian content to a whole new level.

The annual festival, now in its seventh year, features only Canadian content. In fact, the Kingston Canadian Film Festival is the largest exclusively Canadian film festival in the country.Continue...

In-Flight Safety takes off

It’s been an eventful few weeks for Halifax’s In-Flight Safety. In February, their video for “The Coast Is Clear” received a Juno nomination for Video of the Year.

Less than two weeks ago, they took home three East Coast Music Awards—for Group Recording
of the Year, Alternative Recording of the Year, and CBC GALAXIE Rising Star Recording of the Year—
and performed live at the nationally televised ceremony.Continue...

Nourishment from Montreal

Picking up where bands like The Hives and The Mooney Suzuki left off, Les Breastfeeders are all about
having a good time. Combining the simple, repetitive riffs and casual sensibility of garage rock with the ferocity of ’70s punk, Les Breastfeeders have earned fans and friends by just being themselves.

Like their label mates and fellow Montrealers Malajube, who were shortlisted for the Polaris Prize last
year, they sing in French, but lead guitarist Sunny Duval insists that singing in their native tongue has never been a problem.Continue...

Faustus felled by own ambition

Jillian Keiley’s production of The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus aims to demonstrate “how we sing
to each other as much as do birds and whales” by using elements of musical theory in the theatrical
presentation. Keiley’s director’s notes admit Faustus is one of the most challenging but potentially rewarding tests of this idea, because it’s “known as one of the most rhythmically complex works ever composed in pentameter.”

The production’s central problem is its assumption that Marlowe’s rhythmic complexity is not enough in itself; by piling so much additional weight on top of the text, from the sound design to vocal arrangements, Faustus itself is buried under too many other ideas.Continue...

A little help from their Friends

It’s not often that drinking beer on a porch can start a revolution. But then, it’s not often that you find a house like the one on Bellwoods Avenue in Toronto, where ohbijou lead singer and songwriter Casey Mejica lives with her sister and bandmate, Jenny.Continue...

Rock and Roll Report Card

For now, Charlemagne are something of a guilty pleasure, but Deadlines is an entertaining and assured opening volley, capturing a young band at the crossroads between evolving into a terribly good band or just a compellingly terrible one.Continue...

A frightening but hopeful vision

Stepping into See you tomorrow, an exhibit of paintings at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre’s Samuel J. Zacks gallery, your first sensation is of nearly overpowering vertigo. The dizziness comes from
the small exhibit’s massive main attraction, Eleanor Bond’s “Later some industrial refugees from communal settlements in a logged valley in BC.”Continue...

Local artist’s Leisurely Walk not always a clear path

In the middle of Cameron Tomsett’s “Light Up” sits a nondescript everyman.

His demeanour is burdened and his face is vapid and vague. Sitting at the bottom of a lamppost that dominates the frame, he is caught in emotional limbo, stuck between an illuminating dawn and a path of confusion.Continue...

Male perspective on Vagina Monologues

Since 1999, Feb. 14 has been about more than just cinnamon hearts and teddy bears. For the last nine years, V-day, a global movement to stop violence against women and girls, has been celebrated on Valentine’s day, with Eve Ensler’s Vagina Monologues as V-day’s centerpiece in the fight for gender equality and female empowerment.Continue...

Do-it-yourself Disastrous Love Affairs

We Were Writers for Disastrous Love Affairs Magazine is Thomlison’s first release from his independent press, 40wattspotlight.Continue...

No Letdown from Sweet rockers

The Sweet Homewreckers are like the band next door, except actually good—when’s the last time your neighbour’s basement jazz-fusion band got complimentary reviews in Exclaim ! and Chart or hit #43 on the Earshot charts for national campus and community radio? Nice work for six Trent students, if you can get it.Continue...

A ‘listless’ Miss Potter

Set in turn-of-the-century Victorian London, Miss Potter follows the recent trend of films that chronicle the exciting, engaging lives of such interesting artists as Johnny Cash and Ray Charles. Beatrix Potter, the author of the Peter Rabbit children books, is the subject of Hollywood’s most recent biopic. The film, unfortunately, is both stale and painfully slow to say the least.Continue...

The loneliness of the Limestone City

It’s not every night that you’re only one of three people in the theatre—four counting the person
onstage. You would expect, given the small crowd, that the energy of only one man might not be
able to fill the entire Wellington Street Theatre. Think again. The Hack , starring H. Benjamin Ellis as Harrison, is a drug-addled fervour of disillusionment and isolation. The show is based on real-life stories from H. Benjamin Ellis’ stint as a nighttime cabby, as told to writerand director Charles Robertson.Continue...

From Newmarket to Coachella

A lot of musicians aspire to make it big in the music industry through sweat and blood, but the usual result is yellowing pictures of glory days passed and distorted nostalgia.Continue...

Rock and Roll Report Card

Three years after his hit “Right Thurr,” the novelty of Chingy’s St. Louis-style rap has long since worn out. No matter how many vowels he drops “hurr” and “thurr” on the new album, Hoodstar, he can’t seem to pull it together to create a cohesive sound.Continue...

Warm and Woolly tunes leave quiet impression

Even rock stars need a little peace and quiet now and then—but it’s odd that three members of
Canadian rock ’n’ roll juggernaut the Constantines decided to dial it way down at the same time.

During their break after touring Tournament of Hearts , guitarist Steve Lambke released sweet, occasionally twangy, folk as Baby Eagle, lead singer Bry Webb began playing with the Paramedics and keyboardist/guitarist Will Kidman outhushed them all with Woolly Leaves.Continue...

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