Arts

Cultural identity on display in Conditions

Overall, I find the art in this exhibit to be based on the pastimes and pursuits of the stereotypical American male, which—when lent to the great state of Michigan as symbols—fall short of doing justice to both the state and the men alike.Continue...

Student-run film fest blossoms

What do fortune cookies, yellow shoes and female bowel movements have in common? Though seemingly dissimilar, all were featured in this year’s fourth annual Focus Film Festival. The theatre was nearly packed on Saturday night, even though the screening had been moved to the BioSciences Complex from its previous location, Etherington Auditorium, in order to provide more seating.Continue...

Green reorganizes rhymes

Just what in the hell has Tom Green been up to lately, anyway? His show’s no longer on loop on MTV, traumatizing viewers with nonsensical escapades like the cult-skit “The Canterbury Tales.”Continue...

Exploring the artier side of science

New to the Queen’s community is a publication entitled Syndicus . Unlike other magazines and periodicals, Syndicus strives to unite the abilities of the arts and sciences in an exploration of social issues pertinent to all university students.Continue...

Women in all shapes and sizes

It all started when artist Cheryl-Ann Webster heard her 13-year-old daughter discuss her “saving box.” When asked what she was saving up for, she daughter calmly replied that her and her friends were all saving up for breast implants.Continue...

Feist flirts with the Ale House

Leslie Feist is more than just a pretty voice.Continue...

Kenny vs. Spenny worth every penny

It is no secret that reality television has become one of the lowest forms of entertainment on an already disrespected medium.

It is a genre defined by D-list celebrities and members of the public humiliating themselves on national broadcasts for cash prizes. But despite being intellectually despicable, it can also be inexplicably addictive.Continue...

Monkeying with the music business

CBS certainly does not monkey around with its programming.

Queen’s University alum Tom Cavanagh (Ed) is starring in the network’s new show Love Monkey, premiering Jan. 17 at 10 p.m. The dramedy, based on Kyle Smith’s novel of the same title, revolves around 30-something single record executive Tom Farrell (Cavanagh) as he attempts to cope with a demanding job and finding love in New York City, aided by a diverse group of close friends. Along for the ride is fellow Canadian Jason Priestley (Beverly Hills, 90210) and Judy Greer (Elizabethtown).Continue...

Triumphant return for JKKB

Live music is easy to come by in Kingston—thanks in part to the considerably-sized student population—but it’s difficult to find a band like the Jack Kerouac Knapsack Band.

It’s rare to find a band whose performances feature a welcome combination of excellent music, stellar stage presence, and, of course, frat-boy humour, which was exactly what the Jack Kerouac Knapsack Band provided for the boisterously enthusiastic crowd at Clark Hall Pub on Friday night.Continue...

Swimmers play buoyant set

Though it may seem an unlikely move for a club best known for its popular “Hump Night” on Wednesdays, last Thursday night Elixir made another attempt to establish itself as a viable live music venue with the performance of Great Lake Swimmers and Kingston local Stephanie Leah Gora.Continue...

Jam-packed lineup at area venues

Warm up this term with local live entertainment.Continue...

Capote captures essence of author

Biographical movies rarely work, especially because it’s virtually impossible for any person’s life to be condensed into a two-hour narrative. So when filmmakers attempt to do this, the result is typically a limp drama that mythologizes the subject and gives actors an opportunity to milk their weak imitations of celebrities in pursuit of award statues. That is why it is a surprise that Capote is such an effective film.Continue...

Ultraviolet not quite revolutionary

Hitting the stands in November, Ultraviolet : 10.1, the fall 2005 edition of the periodical campus literary publication, served up its trademark fare in a compilation of student poems and short stories coupled with original artwork.Continue...

Catching up with Idol Elena Juatco

A typical Sunday night for the average Queen’s student might involve trolling around on Facebook, working at a part-time job, or even doing a little homework. But for Elena Juatco, ArtSci ’07, such relaxing times were put on hold when she stepped into the title role in Ross Petty’s production of Snow White and the Group of Seven .Continue...

Brooding à la death country

Speaking with the Journal via telephone from the geography company where he works as a cartographer, the guitar player for Elliott Brood—the name of the band, not a solo artist—is “kind of bored,” friendly and chatty.Continue...

Urinetown is hardly a waste

Anyone who likes their musicals with a healthy dose of jazz hands won’t be disappointed with QMT’s new production of Urinetown .Continue...

A&E Staff Picks: Best Albums of 2005

Journal staff pick out their top 5 albums of the year.Continue...

A Very Merry A&E Christmas ...

Downtrodden and overworked, you head home with a stupefied look on your face after your last exam or paper is over with. You trudge up the stairs to your old bedroom at your parents’ house and sleep for 16 hours before finally coming to. You’ve killed 32 trees and suffered three nervous breakdowns with all the essays you’ve just written; you almost had a seizure on your kitchen table after having your sixth double espresso while cramming for your last exam. Christmas Break is looking pretty damn good because it gives you licence to do a whole lot of nothing.Continue...

Here and There—from the Azores to Kingston

While most of today’s indie rock bands record their latest album at an inconspicuous and less-than-glamorous studio or in their garage, such is not the case for up-and-coming band Here and There.

In fact, the locale of their recording studio—and the recording studio itself—is probably one of the most atypical things about the band. After all, not a great deal of today’s indie rock was created and recorded in a beach house on the isolated Azores Islands off the coast of Portugal.Continue...

How We Are Hungry satisfying

Here’s the thing about Dave Eggers: his work is really hard to summarize, because in doing so you inevitably lose something that’s very, very important about it. As one of the 14 unique narrators in How We Are Hungry , Eggers’ new collection of short stories, puts it, “diagnosis would have made it all less interesting.”Continue...

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