Arts

Live Country at The Grad Club

As evidenced by the plethora of different artists represented onstage at the Broken Social Scene concert last week—including Feist, Sarah Harmer, and Jason Tate of The Weakerthans—Canadian musicians rarely confine themselves solely to one project. To witness another perfect example of this flexibility among artists, look no further than The Grad Club’s Halloween party this Saturday and one of two bands to be featured: Live Country Music.Continue...

Horror from around the world

’Tis the Halloween season, a time of year when you can indulge in disturbing horror cinema without feeling guilty about it. Unfortunately, all Hollywood has to offer in theatres right now are unnecessary video game adaptations ( Doom ) and PG-13 remakes ( The Fog ).Continue...

It’s a mod, mod world at Ale House

Sick of dancing to Black Eyed Peas’ My Humps? Join the club. Victoria van Eyk is determined to revamp Kingston’s club scene and show the city there is dancing beyond Kanye West.

Van Eyk, ArtSci ’07, escaped the generic sounds of the Kingston Hub for Toronto on the weekend where she enjoyed a more alternative music scene, rich with the likes of Bloc Party, Arcade Fire, and other alternative acts.Continue...

Elliott Brood chooses Oshawa

Evidently, the prospect of playing a half-hour set for thousands of GM workers politely pretending that they’re not just waiting for “Lost Together” was too enticing for Elliott Brood to resist, and so it was that fifteen mildly confused people filed into The Grad Club at 9:45 to the crunching hometown sounds of Ass Machine—or, more accurately, Ass Machine’s belated sound check, which became immediately apparent when the trio nonchalantly ambled over to the bar for a few more pints. After this brief introduction to Ass Machine, one could tell that the audience was regretting headliner Elliot Brood’s cancellation.Continue...

Liquor & Poker a low draw

Although the show was generally pretty intense, Clark Hall could’ve definitely used a lot more bodies. As the Illuminati’s Nick Sewell put it, “There must be some kind of fucked up calendar in Kingston. Here it’s Monday while everywhere else it’s Saturday and people are out having a good time.”Continue...

Exclaim tour offers a mix of talent

In a modern musical landscape where taste is generally dictated by iPod-toting, blog-reading disciples of online music ’zines such as Pitchforkmedia, it’s easy to question the potency of national music rags such as Exclaim . That doubt might make some cynical when Exclaim sponsors a national tour. But fear not— Exclaim ’s tour sticks to what it knows best: tried and tested Canadian indie rock.Continue...

Alumnus returns

Canadian writer and Queen’s alumnus Adrian Michael Kelly launched his first novel, Down Sterling Road , this month, to rave reviews from critics across Canada. Kelly, who grew up in Campbellford but now hails from Timmins, Ont., completed his MA in English at Queen’s in 2001, where he contributed to The Queen’s Quarterly . He moved to Alberta and pursued journalism, writing for the Calgary Herald and Alberta Views before writing his novel, which he started during a writing workshop in Calgary.Continue...

Vogt A lineup too ambitious

Shakespeare may have had a point when he suggested that “brevity is the soul of wit,” but he probably wasn’t picturing the Vogt Studio Series. A staple of the Queen’s drama department for years, the production series is noble in its aim to showcase student writers and actors, but the results aren’t always successful. Squeezing too much ambition into too short a time slot seems to be a common drawback of the series, and this year’s Slot A is no exception.Continue...

Crowded Scene at Grant Hall

Four years ago, Broken Social Scene was virtually unheard of. After seeing them perform at Grant Hall on Wednesday night, however, I get the feeling this is a band we’ll be reading about in history textbooks and telling our grandchildren about sometime in the distant future.Continue...

Dystopic glimpse of another culture

Stuffy, crowded subway cars with perverted salary men. Poser gangsters in plastic bathroom slippers and adolescent girls selling their own excretions to buy the designer bag of their dreams. This is the dystopic snapshot of Japan that Janice Valerie Young portrays in her novel Sweet Daruma: A Japan Satire.Continue...

Old influences, new record for Snakes

Toronto’s favourite garage rock collective, The Deadly Snakes, has returned with another offering. However, this isn’t the usual exhaust-fume-soaked, five-star whiskey-fuelled four-piece, banging away at power-chorded blues rock on improperly- tuned instruments.Continue...

FemBots release gem of an album

It’s always nice to see a hardworking band hit their stride and be rewarded for their effort.

With the release of their third album—The City—on Paper Bag Records last month, the FemBots are at last garnering the kind of attention that has seemed to come easily to some of their PB label mates, but has always (up to this point) appeared just out of reach for the veteran Toronto scenesters.Continue...

Student exhibit impresses

Attending an art exhibit can be a lot more than just looking at artwork and interpreting the artist’s intended meaning. It can be an entertaining, interactive experience, as a group of fourth-year fine art students demonstrated in their exhibit, First Glance .Continue...

Eclectic Serenity is tough to resist

In movie theatres these days, it’s hard to ignore the depressing number of quick cash-lifts that the movie industry has taken from classic television series.

From the funny—but not particularly enduring—Starsky and Hutch to the downright stupid Dukes of Hazzard, TV adaptations are fun, but not exactly great cinema.Continue...

New York folk band opening doors

When one thinks of New York City, the thoughts of frenzied citizens, countless skyscrapers and a myriad of taxis come to mind. However, the city also has a thriving acoustic folk music scene in which band Crescent and Frost have found their niche. Fortunately, this well-kept secret from New York is about to be released in Kingston.Continue...

Matt Barber vs. hockey night

There is nothing remotely trendy about Matt Barber. Despite his association with bands of such indie rock caliber as Stars, Barber retains a much more organic style, holding him closer in comparison to Canadian songsmiths like Neil Young and the enduring Emm Gryner. Barber’s lyrics seem to contain simple philosophies that touch upon staple singer/songwriter themes—love, loss, and life—and are complemented by the sturdy foundation of a healthy classic rock sound.Continue...

Award-winning play staged

How much can a man really understand about being a woman? As it turns out, plenty. Writer Charles Robertson goes inside the heads and hearts of five of them with Ghost of the Tree , opening this week at Theatre 5.Continue...

Organ tunes up for Grad Club

The Organ will be rolling into Kingston for its third-ever visit to the Limestone City this coming Thursday. Playing a show at The Grad Club with Gentleman Reg, the five-piece all-girl band will go over familiar territory from their album Grab That Gun , which was released last year on Mint Records.Continue...

Cronenberg’s twisted study of Violence

David Cronenberg is without a doubt the strangest Canadian director around. Despite working in a country that is known for an excessively polite and repressed attitude, Cronenberg actively explores the extremes of sex and violence in his work.Continue...

Hamilton band finds groove

Hamilton’s often written off as just a blue-collar steel town south of Toronto, but who knew it had a burgeoning, kick-ass music scene?Continue...

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