The Brew

Allegedly discovered around 2700 B.C. in China, tea is the most popular prepared drink in the world. Sometimes said to be food for thought, tea has found itself warming the hands of every generation—in contemplation, as part of social gathering or a staple in late night relaxation. Kingston has a number of locations that brew bagged n’ ready or loose leaf tea for students.

Tea is derived from the Camellia Sinensis or Thea Sinensis plant and classified as being either black, green, oolong or white.
Herbal teas use dried fruits, flowers, roots and leaves to create a unique, decaffeinated blend.

Personally, I have yet to find a time where the diverse beverage is not a source of comfort and delight. Last winter, confined by the snowy weather, I found myself bored with my stocked tea shelf. In a half-ditch effort to evade studying and brew something new, I began mixing the leaves and creating unique favourites. Here I will be reviewing tea from local sources and posting directions to steep an easy blend of your own.

This weekend I’ll be sampling some of fall’s flavours. I’m searching for October's perfect brews: herbal tea to calm mid-term nerves and caffeinated blends for a morning boost.

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