Features

Sports, community, and mental health

“While it’s challenging to look after your mental health, with all the appointments and all the time it takes to take care of yourself while studying, […] committing to any activities outside of academia will only benefit you in the long run,” Ampai Thammachack, M.Sc. ’22, said in an interview with The Journal .Continue...

Unpacking Canada’s fossil fuel industry

When the Queen’s Finance Association (QFA) hosted RBC CEO David McKay on Nov. 5, protestors stood outside Grant Hall to voice their concerns with RBC’s financing of the fossil fuel industry, particularly their subsidizing of the Line 3 pipeline expansion.Continue...

‘This is an opportunity for us to be critical’: Policing beyond homecoming

During the weekends of Oct. 16 and 23, interactions between Queen’s students and the Kingston police were intensely charged.Continue...

Finding a religious and spiritual community at Queen's

“There’s this myth out there that religion/faith/spirituality is declining, and that people are becoming less and less religiously oriented, but I really don’t think that’s the case,” Ryan Farrell, associate pastor at Queen’s Christian community Geneva House , said in an interview with The Journal. Continue...

The reality of being a woman in STEM

For the past decade, the percentage of women at Queen’s has remained relatively stable at around 57 per cent of the student body. However, in STEM classrooms—any subject falling under science, technology, engineering, and math—women are still a minority.Continue...

How young journalists are tackling race reporting

Race reporting, often at the intersection of journalism and activism, concerns reporting on issues of race and racialization. It’s crucial to accurately represent marginalized perspectives in the media.Continue...

The death of the paper textbook

Textbooks have always been an expensive requirement of attending university, but prices have risen considerably in recent decades.Continue...

The second first-years

The return to campus is one sign the pandemic may be coming to an end. However, the return to in-person learning hasn’t been easy for everyone. Beginning the semester without having a traditional first year has made the transition back to in-person learning challenging for some second-year students.Continue...

Coming to Canada as a refugee

Since confederation in 1867, more than 17 million individuals have come to Canada seeking opportunities from abroad. These folks came from all walks of life, and many were fleeing persecution.Continue...

The power of the student vote

On Sept. 20, Canadians will be heading to the polls for the second time in two years. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the snap election on Aug. 15.Continue...

The spirit of entrepreneurship at Queen's

Many successful businesses have started out of Queen’s. From Iris Technologies creating an LCD computer for people suffering from concussions to Red Gold of Afghanistan selling saffron to help women in Afghanistan, Queen’s has created and supported many student entrepreneurs.Continue...

Learning to navigate finances as a university student

One of the most off-limits topics in our culture is money. The ‘money taboo’ keeps children from learning about financial literacy as they grow up. As a result, young adults often feel confused and overwhelmed when they have to navigate their own finances in university.Continue...

How Eurocentric beauty standards get under the skin

The use of chemicals and potentially toxic makeup to meet societal expectations of beauty isn’t a new phenomenon.Continue...

How Queen's students are celebrating Pride 2021

Amelia Cockerham, ArtSci ’22, is used to spending Pride Month surrounded by other people.Continue...

Off-Campus housing is only getting more expensive

For students living in Kingston, the norm is to pay exorbitant prices for substandard housing. It’s become a rite of passage for Queen’s students to move out of first-year residence and scramble to find housemates and sign leases before the best houses are gone.Continue...

‘It’s split us in half’: First-year students look back on a year of COVID-19

Phoebe Schneider, ArtSci ’24, spent half the year in residence. She told The Journal that, because of this, her first-year experience likely didn’t mirror those stuck at home.Continue...

Understanding the sociological aspects of—and preventing—racist and misogynistic Zoom bombings

Earlier this year, a virtual event hosted by the School of Religion was subject to an attack. Continue...

Understanding conflicting identities as a queer student of colour

For queer students of colour at Queen’s, understanding one’s identity is a lifelong process. It’s one that’s complicated by cultural expectations, covert racism, and the fact that representations of queerness in the media are inherently rooted in whiteness.Continue...

The New York Times had to retract his story. This Queen’s professor stands behind him.

In December 2016, New York Times reporter Rukmini Callimachi travelled to Canada to meet Shehroze Chaudhry, an Oakville, Ontario man who claimed to have been a part of ISIS in Syria in 2014 before returning to Canada. Callimachi, a foreign correspondent who covered Al Qaeda and ISIS at the time, would turn Chaudhry’s story into the award-winning—and later largely retracted—podcast series, Caliphate. But in this moment, as she left Canada, she felt like Chaudhry simply needed someone to talk to.Continue...

Academic accessibility amidst the pandemic

“Having to be my own advocate kind of sucks sometimes.”Continue...

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