Features

Teaching fellowships in the ring

Cost effectiveness and experience for future professors make Teaching
Fellows an attractive alternative.Continue...

Many faces in mayoral race

Mayoral candidates talk to the Journal’s Jake Edmiston about Kingston, Fauxcoming and Town-Gown relationsContinue...

Classrooms full of H’art

Students with intellectual disabilities from the H’art School bring enthusiasm and a love of learning to Queen’s.Continue...

Rules of engagement

Campuses of decades past may have had an aura of activism, but dean says students are as involved as ever.Continue...

Weekend events under debate

Second Fauxcoming will decide fate of Queen’s defunct tradition.Continue...

Heritage or hundreds of thousands?

City council committee wants Queen’s spend over $300,000 to restore 1920s chimney and windows on new arts centre.Continue...

Two months, two bikes and five provinces

Environmental studies student Mike McHugh hit a railroad track and flipped over his handlebars on the first day of a two-month cross-Canada bike tour.Continue...

Douglas yarn unravels

Blueprints from 1916 show construction of Douglas Library was true to Toronto architects’ original plans.Continue...

Where do all the stolen bikes go?

Police say they’re anticipating a surge in stolen bikes reports in the coming weeks. Kingston Police crime analyst Jason Key said the repopulated Queen’s campus is an attractive destination for bike thieves.Continue...

Queen's gets up to speed

Checking back every day during September to see if a spot finally opened in that course you’ve been trying to get into is a reality with the current administrative system, QCARD.
Luckily, there's a $33.5 million University investment being launched this year to remedy that problem and others caused by Queen's 30 year old mainframe.Continue...

Martin receives honorary degree

Many academics worry the tradition of awarding honorary degrees has become warped in recent years. But according to administration, Queen’s has safe guards to maintain the tradition’s credibility.Continue...

The cost to volunteer abroad

When Seetha Ramanathan got off the plane in Quito, she was under strict instructions. She was given the name of a government-regulated taxi company that would take her straight to her placement. A driver was waiting with her name on a sign.Continue...

Tricolour Outlet set to open for business

A new AMS service opening in September is set to breathe some new life into the JDUC.

Once a hub of activity, the former Common Ground space has been vacant since the Queen’s Centre opened in December.Continue...

The body fantastic

On Tuesday, I held a plastinated human heart in my hand as I watched students in a second-year anatomy lab observe and label live human tissues.

I looked around the Anatomy Learning Centre in Botterell Hall and realized I was surrounded by any and every possible human body part: bones, lungs and intestines galore.Continue...

Curbing the quarterlife crisis

University students busy their lives with classes, assignments, essays, and friendships, so thinking about future plans sometimes gets put on the backburner.

But when those thoughts do creep in, students are often flooded with worries of about the future and confusion about the direction in which their lives are heading.Continue...

There is life outside the bubble

University life is sometimes portrayed as an idyllic, cocoon-like atmosphere of drinking and sleeping late with little connection to the real world. This is particularly true at Queen’s University, where the oft-derided “Queen’s bubble” shelters students from their reality of their futures.Continue...

‘You may wish to go beyond the acceptable’

Born in Niles—a small industrial town in northeastern Ohio—Albert Frank Moritz, poet and Griffin Poetry Prize winner, said he spent a Huckleberry Finn-esque childhood along the banks of Mosquito Creek and its surrounding woods.Continue...

The ‘perks’ of augmented reality

A new surgical navigation tool, the first of its kind in Canada, has made simulated needle-based surgeries more accessible.

The Perk Station, an augmented reality surgical navigation suite, strives to make training in percutaneous surgery more accessible for the medical and scientific communities.Continue...

Committing themselves to the moment

As the Winter Olympics heat up on the West Coast, British Columbia improvisation performer and teacher Alistair Cook has a competition of a different nature on his mind.Continue...

Servicing the students

Kingston is home to about 117,000 people, a little less than ten times the Queen’s student population. While Queen’s students spend the better part of their years of study in this town, to many it would seem odd to call it their own.Continue...

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