Features

Making new faculty feel at home

Philosophy professor Udo Schuklenk worked at universities in Germany, Australia, South Africa and Scotland before he came to Queen’s in July 2007.Continue...

Reading behind the bars

When Angela Ruffo was six years old, she learned how to read See Spot Run.Continue...

Voting virtually redefined

On Oct. 14, millions of Canadians will cast their ballots to elect the members of Canada’s 40th Parliament.Continue...

Peer-based discipline ‘more fair’

“I’m going to have to document this.”Continue...

Queen’s own spin doctor

In the throes of two major elections, it can be tough to detect which politicians are genuine and which are spinning tall tales.Continue...

Coming home in other places

Three years of Queen’s Homecomings may have led to numerous tickets and arrests, but all the students and alumni who attend Homecoming at the University of Missouri (MU) this year will be going to court.Continue...

Graduate admissions get personal

A glance at the empty bookshelves in the Career Services library this week makes one thing clear: deadlines for graduate school applications are fast approaching.Continue...

Making the grade

Students arriving at Queen’s are often told they’re surrounded by only A-students.Continue...

The pathology behind procrastination

“Suck it up.” That’s one expert’s advice to students when it’s time to hit the books.Continue...

A price tag for the books

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. But can you judge it by its price tag?Continue...

Knot your average sport

Among the dizzying array of facts that bombard new students during frosh week, Kingston’s status as the freshwater sailing capital of the world is often overlooked.Continue...

Talking Frosh

Why do you shop at the Farmers Market?Continue...

Moving ‘from field to fork’

As visiting parents taxi students to and from grocery stores this week, Kraft Dinner and Pizza Pockets are flying off the shelves. But for some, university life doesn’t necessarily mean microwaves and meal plans. Last Saturday, vendors at the Kingston Public Market downtown watched as students stocked up on fresh, local produce.Continue...

When sports and politics collide

The world’s eyes will be on Beijing this month as it hosts the 2008 Summer Olympic Games with the mantra, “One World, One Dream.” But for Kathy Xu, Sci ’99, this year’s Olympics will only serve to uphold the practices of a regime whose human rights record has inspired talk of boycotts—the loudest since the 1980 Olympics in Moscow when 62 countries, including Canada, skipped the Games.Continue...

Williams Sticking to His Principles

In April, Principal Tom Williams told the Journal he’s not interested in being considered for reappointment. After seven weeks on the job, he hasn’t changed his mind.
He said it was his affection for the University and the prospect of a challenge that encouraged him to take the short-term position. In keeping with University policy, Williams won’t be involved in the search for his successor.Continue...

From Hitchcock to headhunters

When former Principal Karen Hitchcock resigned April 16—more than a year before the end of her term—the University’s hunt for a stand-in didn’t take long. Principal Tom Williams took on the role on May 1.Continue...

Canada-wide student government

The University of British Columbia’s Alma Mater Society executive gets lunch every day, plus cell phones. At the University of Western Ontario, institutional memory within the student government is ensured thanks to 55 full-time, permanent staff. Last year, Simon Fraser University’s student government executive was impeached.
This year, each of the three members of the Queen’s Alma Mater Society (AMS) executive—President Kingsley Chak, Vice-President (Operations) John Manning and Vice-President (University Affairs) Julia Mitchell—will receive a $19,453 salary.Continue...

The Journal presents ... the best of Kingston

For the past three weeks, the Journal’s website has featured an online survey that allowed you to vote
for your favourite things to do on campus and in Kingston. Today, we present to you what you had to say.Continue...

How throwing rocks can change lives

Mike Karkheck is living proof of the impact that Camp Outlook can have on impressionable young minds.Continue...

Student safety one year later

One year ago, the Queen’s and the Kingston community reeled in the wake of an unthinkable tragedy. In the early hours of March 25, 2005, Justin Schwieg—a 23-year-old fifth-year PhysEd student, football player and bouncer at The Brass—died from injuries caused by what the Kingston police called “an unprovoked assault.” He was stabbed near the second-floor bar of A.J.’s Hangar nightclub.Continue...

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