Features

Making the grade

Students arriving at Queen’s are often told they’re surrounded by only A-students.Continue...

The pathology behind procrastination

“Suck it up.” That’s one expert’s advice to students when it’s time to hit the books.Continue...

A price tag for the books

You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. But can you judge it by its price tag?Continue...

Knot your average sport

Among the dizzying array of facts that bombard new students during frosh week, Kingston’s status as the freshwater sailing capital of the world is often overlooked.Continue...

Talking Frosh

Why do you shop at the Farmers Market?Continue...

Moving ‘from field to fork’

As visiting parents taxi students to and from grocery stores this week, Kraft Dinner and Pizza Pockets are flying off the shelves. But for some, university life doesn’t necessarily mean microwaves and meal plans. Last Saturday, vendors at the Kingston Public Market downtown watched as students stocked up on fresh, local produce.Continue...

When sports and politics collide

The world’s eyes will be on Beijing this month as it hosts the 2008 Summer Olympic Games with the mantra, “One World, One Dream.” But for Kathy Xu, Sci ’99, this year’s Olympics will only serve to uphold the practices of a regime whose human rights record has inspired talk of boycotts—the loudest since the 1980 Olympics in Moscow when 62 countries, including Canada, skipped the Games.Continue...

Williams Sticking to His Principles

In April, Principal Tom Williams told the Journal he’s not interested in being considered for reappointment. After seven weeks on the job, he hasn’t changed his mind.
He said it was his affection for the University and the prospect of a challenge that encouraged him to take the short-term position. In keeping with University policy, Williams won’t be involved in the search for his successor.Continue...

From Hitchcock to headhunters

When former Principal Karen Hitchcock resigned April 16—more than a year before the end of her term—the University’s hunt for a stand-in didn’t take long. Principal Tom Williams took on the role on May 1.Continue...

Canada-wide student government

The University of British Columbia’s Alma Mater Society executive gets lunch every day, plus cell phones. At the University of Western Ontario, institutional memory within the student government is ensured thanks to 55 full-time, permanent staff. Last year, Simon Fraser University’s student government executive was impeached.
This year, each of the three members of the Queen’s Alma Mater Society (AMS) executive—President Kingsley Chak, Vice-President (Operations) John Manning and Vice-President (University Affairs) Julia Mitchell—will receive a $19,453 salary.Continue...

The Journal presents ... the best of Kingston

For the past three weeks, the Journal’s website has featured an online survey that allowed you to vote
for your favourite things to do on campus and in Kingston. Today, we present to you what you had to say.Continue...

How throwing rocks can change lives

Mike Karkheck is living proof of the impact that Camp Outlook can have on impressionable young minds.Continue...

Student safety one year later

One year ago, the Queen’s and the Kingston community reeled in the wake of an unthinkable tragedy. In the early hours of March 25, 2005, Justin Schwieg—a 23-year-old fifth-year PhysEd student, football player and bouncer at The Brass—died from injuries caused by what the Kingston police called “an unprovoked assault.” He was stabbed near the second-floor bar of A.J.’s Hangar nightclub.Continue...

On spirituality, student support and the reinvention of the Maid of the Mist

As warm Saturday sunlight streamed in through the windows of Wallace Hall, Mitchell Shewell, the Aboriginal Healing and Wellness Coordinator for the Katarokwi Native Friendship Centre, held up one of his complex, hand-crafted dream catchers and talked about the deep care that had gone into its creation.Continue...

A Wells-spring of political punditry

He may be known as Canada’s foremost political blogger, but Maclean’s magazine columnist Paul Wells would rather not tell you about that.Continue...

New possibilities abound for MCRC

Wanted: one individual willing to work 24/7 as mentor and manager, advocate for students in residence, provide training to 50-plus staff, live in the workplace and pay up front for room and board. Salary: $8,661.Continue...

Orbinski: ‘Just live your questions’

While perched on a crate in a food centre in Baidoa, Somalia in 1992, Dr. James Orbinski looked out at the three white tents designated as morgues. Although the day’s dead were piled up inside, the former president of Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) said he noticed a movement made by a body lying at the top of one heap.Continue...

A lecture in your back pocket

Jessica Wynja, ArtSci ’08, sits in her 8:30 a.m. lecture and tries to scribble down what her professor is saying. Because Wynja hasn’t shaken off her morning grogginess, she can’t write as fast as her professor speaks, and she misses some of his points.Continue...

Married ... with classes

Last August, Andrea Shapero got married. While she has adopted the last name of her new husband, Jonathan, 24, a fourth-year Queen’s medical student, she said she hasn’t yet filed the paperwork to change the name on her school records.Continue...

How $8,000 became $523.85

When former ASUS Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer Ian Anderson presented his outgoing 2004-05 budget at the Sept. 29 ASUS Assembly meeting, the net profit from last year’s ASUS jacket sales was listed among hundreds of other revenues and expenses.

The profit from jackets was $523.85—a small profit within a budget that included a $29,652 loss from ASUS Formal, which former ASUS President John Andrew Pankiw-Petty attributed to poor attendance.Continue...

Pages