Features

How $8,000 became $523.85

When former ASUS Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer Ian Anderson presented his outgoing 2004-05 budget at the Sept. 29 ASUS Assembly meeting, the net profit from last year’s ASUS jacket sales was listed among hundreds of other revenues and expenses.

The profit from jackets was $523.85—a small profit within a budget that included a $29,652 loss from ASUS Formal, which former ASUS President John Andrew Pankiw-Petty attributed to poor attendance.Continue...

Wolfe Islanders at crossroads

According to the Ontario Landowner’s Guide to Wind Energy, published by Hearthmakers Energy Cooperative, wind turbines produce a sound that is audible for 250 to 350 metres from the base of the turbine and measures between 35 to 45 dB(A).Continue...

Winds of change blowing on Wolfe Island

During the many years Ian Baines, Sci ’74, spent knocking on doors seeking financial and political support for his renewable energy initiatives, he got used to a particular reaction from government and business staff.Continue...

The parties’ stances on education

Elections are often like an auction, where the most votes go to the highest-bidding candidate. To evaluate this year’s bids, the Journal spoke to representatives of four of the parties and analyzed their platforms to gauge what each has to offer the youngest voting demographic.Continue...

Walker: ‘Everybody should be represented’

Next Monday, Karl Eric Walker wants you to vote for the lone wolf.

The only candidate in Kingston and the Islands running as an independent, Walker said he wants to send a message to the candidates campaigning as members of political parties.Continue...

Walton: hare gaining on the tortoise

Eric Walton, the Green Party candidate for Kingston and the Islands, thinks Queen’s students have an important role to play in the Jan. 23 election. After being born in Ottawa and spending his formative years in various locales across Europe, the Middle East and Asia, Walton came to Kingston in 1978 to study at the University, and he hasn’t looked back since.Continue...

Rogers: sovereign Canada paramount

Although Canadian Action Party (CAP) candidate Don Rogers could be considered a long shot to become the MP for Kingston and the Islands, the long-time politician has overcome similar obstacles before.Continue...

Milliken: Speaker seeking sixth term

Heading into the election that could return him to Parliament for a sixth term, incumbent Liberal MP and Speaker of the House Peter Milliken is campaigning as a self-described voice of experience.
Milliken has been involved with politics since high school, when he volunteered on Liberal Edgar J. Benson’s 1963 re-election campaign and was impressed enough to later join the party.Continue...

Hutchison: seeking a fair society

Rob Hutchison, the NDP candidate for Kingston and the Islands, said he stepped into the political arena because he is looking to promote both change and hope.
A graduate of Queen’s and St. Lawrence College and a long-time Kingston resident, Hutchison has been active in a number of organizations advocating social change, including the Kingston Global Community Centre, Pollution Probe and the Kingston Not-For-Profit Advisory Group. He has worked for Kingston Cooperative Housing Inc. for more than 15 years.Continue...

Grimshaw: a different perspective

Conservative candidate Lou Grimshaw thinks he brings a different perspective to the issues raised in this election campaign, thanks in large part to the 40 years he spent as a professional officer in the Canadian Army.Continue...

Canada’s Chief Justice lays down the law

All human beings are intrinsically worthy of respect, simply because they are human beings—that was the message the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada had for a standing-room-only crowd in Dunning Auditorium last Thursday.Continue...

Belinda Stronach on switching parties, women in politics and what will happen if the Liberals win ... or lose

Two days before a budget vote last May, the Newmarket-Aurora MP Belinda Stronach left her post as the international trade critic for the Conservative Party and joined Paul Martin’s minority government as minister of human resources and democratic renewal.Continue...

What makes a town home?

Karachi is a busy bustling city, a metropolis too big for its own good. It seems to be bursting at its seams, with too many people, cars, houses, traffic, troubles and buildings—all packed into an area with not enough trees, parks and relaxing spots.Continue...

The pros and cons of plastic

Before coming to university, Vivian Lee, ArtSci ’06, got a credit card from TD Canada Trust on her parents’ recommendation. Lee said she chose a TD card because she already had an account with the bank.

However, Lee said she didn’t know much about essential elements like credit ratings, payment options and debt before signing up.Continue...

‘Oh, they lost a lot of people’

On Sept. 17, 1944, Allied forces in Holland, hot on the trail of European liberation, launched Operation Market Garden. Thousands of paratroopers dropped out of the sky as ground forces followed their progression on land.Continue...

Survey says

Patrick Deane, vice-principal (academic), said it’s too early to determine what exactly the McGuinty government meant when it said new funding packages for Ontario’s universities will include “results-based” funding.Continue...

Fees address ‘Queen’s specific needs’

As a don, Sarah Burd, ArtSci ’06, said it’s part of her job to help students with their everyday worries. She said students have approached her during her two years as a don to discuss stressful issues ranging from relationships to grades. But there’s one topic students have never discussed with her. Money.Continue...

Kingston’s most haunted

Most innkeepers have a passing knowledge of who’s staying under their roof each night. But there are several guests at Kingston’s Hochelaga Inn that innkeeper Anne Boyd has never seen.Continue...

Coping with a ‘weary, stale’ world

In the 1970s, there were fewer than 50 reported cases of anorexia in the world, but today entire scientific journals are devoted to eating disorders.

Many researchers believe the rise of eating disorders in developed countries can be attributed to an increasing cultural emphasis on unhealthy weight loss. Dr. Mike Condra, director of HCDS, pointed out that young female university students are especially vulnerable to eating disorders.Continue...

Paying more to get more?

When Dalton McGuinty became premier in 2003, he followed through on an election promise to place a two-year freeze on tuition. Last month, McGuinty announced the tuition freeze would end after this academic year.

Before the tuition freeze, the Ontario government regulated Arts and Science programs to a fee increase of no more than two per cent per year.Continue...

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