Lifestyle

My Ghettohouse: under the sea at ‘The Reef’

“We all like that all four bedrooms are upstairs,” said de Jonge. “And we like the big living space,” added Lorimer. “We also love to sit out on the roof when the weather’s nice,” she said. “It’s great for people watching.Continue...

Riding the wave of a Tory turnaround

I knew I had a spectacular show ahead of me the minute I hit the Toronto highway.

A slogan was scrawled broadly on the back of the blue cube van that was speeding along Allen Road towards Highway 401 West: “Stand up for Canada.”

I chuckled to myself. What bizarre luck for me to have turned onto the road directly behind the campaign vehicle of Lewis Reford, Conservative candidate for Toronto-Central.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 133, issue 25.Continue...

Rosie the Clown: where is she now?

Recently I sat down in the Coffee and Company on the corner of Division and Johnson streets with Rosie “the Clown” Elston—who ran in Kingston as an independent candidate in the last federal election. We were talking amidst a bewildered crowd of C&C patrons, and I was having the most fun I’ve ever had in an interview.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 133, issue 24.Continue...

A ‘mountain’ of romantic discontent

Thanks to the media and its highly sophisticated airbrushing, blemishes can be taken out in every possible context. Even romance is bleached faultless—love conquers all, inevitably, at the end. Lavishly, handsomely, youthfully.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 133, issue 23.Continue...

Looking back: New Year’s resolutions

The past year has seen the end of the Ugg boot, Hurricane Katrina’s devastation in the Southern U.S., a Homecoming celebration of dizzying new lows and the tendency of Kanye West’s “Gold Digger” to become indelibly stuck in my head.Continue...

Ch-ch-ch-changes: Another year gone

I won’t lie to you. Of all the people to be occupying this space at the back of this student newspaper, of all the former student writers who have left the student life for something else altogether, of all the people who could be capable of some sort of authorial claim over the cold reality and unspoken trials of post-graduate life —well, I gotta say, I’m probably not your girl.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 133, issue 22.Continue...

The forgotten merits of clean hands

When Robert Fulghum wrote All I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten , he wasn’t kidding. After all, the most important lessons in life are learned very early—we just have a tendency to consistently forget them.

Lessons like the importance of having clean hands, for example.Continue...

Issue in photos

View all images from vol. 133, issue 21.Continue...

The Journal’s favourite CanLit

Margaret Atwood. Wow, bold choice. But really, I made it because I think she’s overlooked as a poet. I’m willing to bet that every person who reads this has read an Atwood novel, but the number of Atwood poetry fans seems to shrink enormously.Continue...

Midas’ Wife

The blue vein ripples over bones, back of your hand,
those four straight chicken claws in your skinContinue...

Soft spoken cranes

I prefer you soft-spoken, words uncurled
And an unmentioned hand
That twists paper-thin sentences into origami cranes
They stretch their wings that we have made
They are creased in all the wrong places
Not from a lack of concentration or effort
But a lack of skill
Yet still they dive with an oddly curved neck
Into our conversation (devoid of any grand purpose)Continue...

Road Map

i pretty much grew up on the road.
my daddy taught me to read using roadsigns
and then showed me how to understand a map,
so that he could just concentrate
on the car in front of him. i was the only
navigator under the age of seven around,
he’d say. i was one of a kind.Continue...

Twelve months, twelve books, twelve great Canadian authors

With typical Canadian irony, try starting your year off with an ending by reading this, the culmination of Davies’ Deptford Trilogy. This novel tells the story of just how far one man can go, and how many changes, disguises and mysteries can flow from a single person.Continue...

Kingston’s Heighton breaks the rules

While standing on a corner at Princess Street, I slowly realize I have no idea where Steven Heighton lives.

Normally, this lack of knowledge wouldn’t be an issue. But on this particular day, it’s a problem. I’m supposed to meet Heighton at his home at 1 p.m., and as the hands on my watch creep towards 1:05, I’m still staring at the address Heighton gave me over the phone that I wrote down. Sadly, the address doesn’t appear to exist.Continue...

‘It’s stunning, rugged and beautiful’

Steven Heighton. Bronwen Wallace. Diane Schoemperlen. All are distinguished members of a large group of professional writers who have come to Kingston for one reason or another—whether to go to Queen’s, to enjoy the less expensive cost of living, or simply to enjoy the scenery—and ended up staying here permanently.Continue...

No pioneers roughing it between these pages

Wilderness. Tales of struggle. Presbyterianism.

If that sounds like the perfect recipe for the great Canadian novel, think again.Continue...

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