News

Class of ’48 ½ bursary unclaimed

The Queen’s University class of 1948 ½ has a problem. It has money to give away but no one is taking it.

A $50,000 bursary set up by the class of 1948 ½—the only class in Queen’s history to graduate in three and a half years instead of four—is waiting for someone to apply for it. Class member Jack Billingsley is concerned that a student somewhere is missing out on a terrific opportunity.Continue...

News In Brief

The Queen’s School of Business received its highest ranking ever in the annual survey conducted by the Financial Times, placing 17th for its Open Executive programs. These programs are unique in that they are open to all executives and cover a wide variety of financial subjects. This ranking marks an improvement over the past two years, when Queen’s placed 22 and 29. Queen’s is the only Canadian school to have appeared on the list three years in a row.Continue...

Queen’s alumnus held at gunpoint

Queen’s Political Studies professor Abigail Bakan received the scare of her life when she was contacted by the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs with a message from her husband.
Kellogg had been taken into custody and was being held at gunpoint.

The editor of the Socialist Worker newspaper and a Queen’s graduate, Kellogg was the only Canadian attending the Asia Pacific Labour Solidarity Conference in Jakarta, Indonesia earlier this month.Continue...

Housing verdict is the cat’s meowHousing verdict is the cat’s meow

When Queen’s Apartment and Housing Services told two students they had to get rid of their cats if they wanted to renew their lease, the students took Queen’s to court and won.

The University is not allowed to refuse to renew a lease as an enforcement of its no-pets policy, according to an Ontario Court of Appeal decision handed down earlier this month.

Queen’s leases 550 housing units to students annually.Continue...

Queen’s launches telepsychiatry project

Faculty from the Queen’s department of psychiatry were on hand May 30 when the electronic ribbon was cut to mark the beginning of a new era in the treatment of psychiatric patients: telepsychiatry.

Offered jointly by the Providence Continuing Care Centre (PCCC) and the psychiatry department at Queen’s, people in need of treatment in rural areas are now able to receive psychiatric care from doctors in Kingston via a closed circuit television system.Continue...

Theft scuffs Shinerama

Fundraising money collected last year for the Shinerama campaign for cystic fibrosis was stolen from an Aberdeen Street house late last month.

$800 in rolled coins was taken from the home of Paul Sawtell, the orientation fundraising chair responsible for Shinerama.

The money was raised from two smokers at Alfie’s and the coat check at last year’s ArtSci formal.Continue...

In death, Dean gave hope, say friends

Dr. Smith, former dean of Health Sciences, passed away just over a week ago, nearly two years after making the announcement he had ALS, the fatal neurological disease commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Dr. Smith resigned as dean in September 1999, but was far from finished his life’s work. Despite the toll the disease was taking on his life, Dr. Smith continued to study, teach and sharing his first hand experiences having lived a full life despite a terminal illness.Continue...

AMS web site linked to porn

Visitors to the official AMS web site June 16 were two mouse clicks away from half-naked women and men.

In an attempt to direct its visitors to a good laugh, myams.org linked to the Ray Owens’ Joke A Day web site, a site offering “babe a day” and “hunk a day” pages featuring scantily clad men and women in sexually-provocative poses.Continue...

Rape drugs infiltrate Queen’s

It's been twelve years since students fought back after a student was raped while crossing Kingston field, but sexual violence has not disappeared from Queen's altogether, said Louise Fish, head of campus security.

While services like Walk Home and the blue light security poles have contributed to a relatively safe campus, students need to turn their attention to local bars where the use of rape drugs is increasing at an alarming rate, said Fish.Continue...

News In Brief

The Kingston HIV/AIDS Regional Services office received a threatening phone call last week. The anonymous male who phoned threatened to go to local parks with others and assault gay men, engaging he what he termed "gay bashing". Due to the close proximity of several parks to Campus, Queen's Security has issued a security alert.Continue...

Glaxo suit dropped, activists carry on

Glaxo Wellcome may have dropped their lawsuit, but student activists pledge to continue the fight against corporate involvement at Queen's. Last month, Glaxo Wellcome—now GlaxoSmithKline— and 38 other pharmaceutical giants announced that they were dropping their lawsuit challenging a South African law enacted to provide cheaper AIDS drugs to millions of Africans infected by the virus. This ended what had become a public relations nightmare for the companies.Continue...

Torn pants no joke, says Svend

Svend Robinson, the New Democrat MP who is suing the RCMP and the federal government over what he calls excessive force at the Quebec City summit, explained his reasons for filing the lawsuit at an NDP fundraiser in the John Deutsch University Centre last Thursday.

The lawsuit was filed because the government refused to launch an inquiry into the tactics used by RCMP officers, said Robinson.Continue...

Bad weekend for Binnie

Max Binnie couldn’t catch a break this Victoria Day weekend.

The AMS communications manager returned to Kingston after a weekend trip to discover that both his office in the John Deutsch University Centre and University Street house had been broken into.

Just after 5 a.m. on Sunday, May 20, campus security was alerted by a custodian that the window to the AMS communications office was wide open. A further investigation revealed the office had been broken into and two computer towers, valued at two thousand dollars each, were missing.Continue...

Council still in disarray

Despite the fact that elections were held in February, the Jean Royce Hall Council is still a work in progress. Following the resignation of Council Vice-President elect David Wong, the search for a replacement is underway.
After winning the election in February, the Davies-Wong team was disqualified by the Chief Returning Officer of Jean Royce Hall. The team was accused of breaking several election rules.Continue...

Queer Studies comes out

Queen's students can now add a queer component to their degrees.

On Wednesday morning, the University Senate unanimously approved an application from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences for a certificate program in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender studies.

Administered by the Institute of Women's Studies, the certificate program will be one of only two such programs in Canada, the other one being the sexual diversity minor at the University of Toronto.Continue...

Outraged critics bash degree

Alumni and students are fuming after it was announced that the woman who headed a shelter where a five-month-old baby died of neglect will receive an honourary degree from Queen's.

Catherine Brooks is the executive director and co-founder of Anduhyaun, a multi-service Aboriginal agency in Toronto which includes the women's shelter.Continue...

Macrocosm

The case of twin baby girls sold and adopted over the internet has reopened debate on how to regulate what is bought and sold online. On Wednesday British Prime Minister Tony Blair called the adoption deplorable and promised to move forward with new adoption laws. The government of Wales is investigating Alan and Judith Kilshaw’s adoption of the six month-old infants who paid a reported $12,000 (U.S.) administrative fee from the Caring Hearts Adoption Web site—which is no longer accessible.Continue...

Profs contributed to new $10 bill

The blind and visually impaired may find reading Canadian bank notes a great deal easier now that raised “texture patches,” invented by Queen’s psychologist Dr. Susan Lederman will appear on new bills, which were launched earlier this week.
“It’s a wonderfully exciting project,” commented Lederman, an expert in understanding how human beings perceive the world through the sense of touch. She researched, designed and scientifically tested the durable tactile feature that has been added to the new bank notes produced by the Bank of Canada.Continue...

News In Brief

A Queen’s scientist is beginning a study in an undeveloped field of research: male menopause or andropause. Dr. Alvaro Morales of the Department of Urology, along with researchers in Rochester and Quebec, will be examining the symptoms associated with the aging process such as a lowered sex drive, depression and fatigue. Dr. Morales told the Queen’s Gazette that research into how men age is 25 years behind comparable studies in women and that understanding these biological and emotional changes is critically important in preparing for an increase in the number of elderly people in the global population.Continue...

Solar car team honoured for outstanding contribution

In recognition of its accomplishments over the past 12 years, which includes a world record, the Queen’s solar vehicle team is this year’s recipient of the Jim Bennett Achievement Award.

The award is for Kingstonians who have made outstanding achievements in careers, sports, the arts and volunteer work. Past winners include the Queen’s Bands and the Golden Gaels football team.Continue...

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