Have we lost our virginity?

Highly rated, raunchy TV steals our innocence

The evolution of raunchy TV: from Married...With Children to Sex and the City, we like to watch people talking about sex.
The evolution of raunchy TV: from Married...With Children to Sex and the City, we like to watch people talking about sex.
Dawson’s Creek ratings rose as Pacey learned the birds and the bees from his teacher.
Dawson’s Creek ratings rose as Pacey learned the birds and the bees from his teacher.

Sex & the Media

Everywhere we look, we see people undressing, talking about sex, and writing books about new positions and places to perform this once-so-preciously-held and now-exploited act. From sex scandals to tips in Cosmo on how to “please” your man, it seems that knowing who’s done it and where to get it is the latest trend. But are we getting hornier or is this something we’ve been brainwashed to want?

Television has become a series of plotless sitcoms with one dimension - stereotypical characters who embark on the journey of finding true love and doing it doggie style. It’s as if the be all and end all of some of these teen shows today is sex. And yes, you may argue that it’s educational to teach kids the consequences and responsibilities of it, but there’s nothing educational about Dawson’s Creek’s Pacey having sex with his high school teacher.

I guess the question I ask you is have we gone too far? Have we overused sex to manipulate TV ratings, attract attention on websites, or trick us into buying more self-degrading magazines with waif models on the covers? Have we lost sight of content and entertainment value due to our obsession with sex?

Now, before you get defensive, let me assure you I don’t think our society is filled with nymphomaniacs. I simply think we’ve come to assume or expect sex in every movie, show or piece of writing we come across. I myself am guilty of feeling surprised after watching a movie without a sex scene. But does this make me sex obsessed? Of course not. It’s perfectly natural to anticipate a stark naked scene between two attractive actors when that’s what they usually hype up in their previews.

So, should we start sauntering around naked, hand in hand, celebrating our sexuality? Give it another ten years. What we should do is think about what we’ll do once baring it all and watching soft porn on Showcase becomes more of the norm than it already is. What will happen then? How will we be entertained? Will they strand contestants on islands and see who gets pregnant most frequently? Or, create America’s Funniest Sex Spots with humourous dialogue between curved penises and heart-shaped vulvas? Whatever it is, they’ll think of something and we’ll keep watching.

--------------
The Sex and the Media column appears frequently in the Arts and Entertainment section. If you love writing or sex or both, contact Natalia Diaz at The Queen’s Journal 533-2800 or drop by the house at 272 Earl St.

When commenting, be considerate and respectful of writers and fellow commenters. Try to stay on topic. Spam and comments that are hateful or discriminatory will be deleted. Our full commenting policy can be read here.