The evolution of Frosh Week

Phrases on frosh coveralls like “Lick it, slam it, suck it” spark a year-long debate on whether the slogans endorsed sexual assault.
Phrases on frosh coveralls like “Lick it, slam it, suck it” spark a year-long debate on whether the slogans endorsed sexual assault.
Credit: 
Journal File Photo

1928

Standards for acceptable hazing are written into the AMS constitution. Males are required to identify themselves as first-year students by constantly carrying umbrellas and are expected to have match boxes on hand at all times to light cigarettes for their frosh leaders. Frosh weren’t allowed to date until after Christmas exams.

1955

Queen’s students rush the field at the University of Toronto following a football game between the Golden Gaels and the Varsity Blues. The students steal goal posts to be used in the Queen’s Engineering Society’s Grease Pole tradition.

1971

Students vote to keep Frosh Week hazing traditions in a campus-wide referendum.

1976

Women participate in the Grease Pole event for the first time.

1984

Organizers of the Grease Pole event purchase tomatoes a week in advance to allow them to rot before being thrown at frosh. Vomit, urine, cow heads and organs are dumped into the water surrounding the pole.

Twenty-five students are taken to hospital with minor injuries.

1989

In response to a campus-wide date rape awareness campaign, a group of male students living on the third floor of Gordon House residence hang signs in windows facing Leonard Field that read “No means tie me up”, “No means more beer” and “No means harder.”

1989

Phrases on frosh coveralls like “Fuck me, suck me, chew me raw” and “Lick it, slam it, suck it” spark a year-long debate on whether the slogans endorsed sexual assault.

1991

The Jackson Report calls for the end of AMS-sanctioned alcoholic events and the removal of vulgar slogans on coveralls.

1997

Families driving first-year students to Queen’s are met with signs on highway 401 near Kingston that read “Queen’s fathers, say goodbye to your daughters’ virginity!”

2006

House parties are banned from Frosh Week events.

2007

Alcohol references are omitted from Frosh Week cheers.

2008

Two students attending the Frosh Week concert fall over seven metres into a dry moat. Both students recovered in hospital.

2011

Frosh Week concert returns to campus.

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