Anomalous Vogt

Four unique plays bring four varied themes

This year’s production of Vogt A featured four unique plays about a cannibalistic Italian woman, a British pink horse, a sad dance routine and a thwarted assassination attempt.
This year’s production of Vogt A featured four unique plays about a cannibalistic Italian woman, a British pink horse, a sad dance routine and a thwarted assassination attempt.
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Vogt A housed an eclectic and entertaining stage on Tuesday in its four plays — none of which connected.

This year’s Vogt A was aptly entitled Vogt’s Anomalies and anomalous was just the word to describe the night.

Leonarda Makes Cookies and Soap is about an Italian woman who is undeniably insane. Believing she’s cursed, Leonarda Cianciulli decides that human sacrifices are the only way to rid herself of the curse. So she lures women into her house and comedically “kills” them backstage with loud booms and clangs.

The character ends up in a criminal asylum and the audience is left in fits of giggles hearing Sara Chiodo’s Italian accent uttering swear words like “fook” and “sheet.” Chiodo was a very strong lead for a character who killed people and made their blood into bars of soap and baked goods, which made it funny instead of just plain crazy.

My Friend Penelope, the second play, centred around a schizophrenic person named Clark and his hallucination Penelope, a pink horse. They attend a counselling session with other mentally ill people, including Elliot Maxwell’s Scottish character Stanley, who thinks he’s in the middle of a warzone.

More accents were used with Mariah Horner as the imaginary pink horse — a character I could have watched on stage all night. The actors used the space of the Vogt Studio to its full extent and each character in their own neuroses helped to portray the theme that everyone is crazy — some of us are just better at hiding it.

The third play was called Solace and it was the most out of character of the four. The play was more of a dance performance than anything else and only one of the five dancers spoke.

Beck Lloyd as the character of “Madness” was a haunting narrator to the waspy dullness of the actors playing “Sadness” and “Hope.” Lloyd was the only speaking actor and her rhyming lines gave me chills.

Because the play was abstract in its speech, the audience was left to interpret what they had seen — my interpretation circled around the play suggesting that yin-yang push of polar emotions in life.

The last play, entitled The Uncomfortably Damp Assassin, was an ironic comedy about an unfortunate encounter in an elevator between a female assassin and the man she doesn’t yet know she’s supposed to be targeting.

Gray Lucas as the businessman was a lovable oaf character whose facial expressions said a lot more than the words that came out of his mouth.

The shows left me feeling refreshed at the variety of different acts I had just seen.

I guess the title of the production is Vogt’s Anomalies for a reason.

Vogt’s Anomalies is at the Vogt Studio in Carruthers Hall tonight and tomorrow night at 6:30 p.m.and 8 p.m.

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