BISC sees program, personnel changes

Students attending the Bader International Study Centre (BISC) in Herstmonceux, England are the first to experience a new academic program that consolidates history and drama into a special module.

2014 brought a number of changes to the BISC: the cancellation of HIST 125 and DRAM 100, the introduction of BISC 100 and BISC 101 and the termination of executive director Bruce Stanley.

BISC 100 and BISC 101 are intended to replace the first-year drama and history courses as part of a new first-year program. BISC 100 (Thinking Locally) focuses on issues of identity and boundary related to Britain, and 101 (Acting Globally) extrapolates these concepts globally.

All first-year students are required to enroll in these courses, which combine lectures, group work, seminars and one-on-one meetings.

Provost Alan Harrison said the history and drama departments were involved in the development of BISC 100 and 101.

“History and Drama are confident that these courses will prepare BISC students well for entry into their fields when they return to Kingston,” he told the Journal via email.

“There will be learning opportunities on the relevant skills and content that the respective departments have specified.”

There are no plans to reintroduce HIST 125 or DRAM 100 in the future.

According to a release written by Harrison and posted on the BISC website, Stanley left the BISC in February over “a result of differences with respect to the priorities of the [BISC]”.

Stanley took over from David Bevan in 2011. When he started, he hoped to enhance the internationalization of the BISC, particularly through his contacts in the Middle East.

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