Thank You Letter: Strong female friendships

An appreciation for women who build each other up

Credit: 
Journal File Photo

As I’ve ventured through university, my appreciation for strong friendships between women has continued to grow. 

I can confidently say that I’ve benefitted—especially in my second year at Queen’s—from being surrounded by women who genuinely care about each other. They’ve provided me the opportunity to grow in non-judgemental, empathetic spaces.

Some have a tendency to label these friendships as fake, claiming a woman’s competitiveness will prevent her from having friendships like men. The media also tends to portray women’s friendships as nasty and manipulative to undermine their value. 

But scripted portrayals of women’s friendships couldn’t be further from the truth.  

My friendships with the women in my life are as intimate and powerful as men’s equivalents around me—often more so.    

Whether I’m asking a friend to text me when she arrives home safely or surrounding myself with women who earnestly look out for each other, the support of another woman has proved indispensable. 

Women understand each other’s experiences and can provide the necessary support when a man can’t. These friendships also host a certain level of intimacy that can’t be compared to what one might share with a significant other. 

I’ve found myself in situations in the past where the women I considered friends have spread negative rumours about me to others. These were not true friendships.   

Real friendships between women are strong, resilient, and understanding. Women who are true friends work to build each other up and provide a safety net, made with empathy and love, to fall back on in times of struggle.

Real friendships between women are strong, resilient, and understanding.

I’m thankful for the emotional and spiritual support that the strong women in my life continue to provide me with. Being able to confide in someone entirely and share my concerns, struggles, or hopes for the future has truly aided in my post-secondary growth. 

I especially benefited from these friendships at a time in my post-secondary career where I found myself looking for a community in which to build my identity. These women were crucial to helping me feel like I belonged at Queen’s.   

I find myself even more appreciative now of the strength of the women I’ve befriended, looking towards those who are older than me to find role models. These women have given me intellectual challenges, and a model of success and courage that inspires me on a daily basis to be better and more attentive to those around me. 

The women who treated me as their friend, especially in my second year at Queen’s, provided me with nothing but the most genuine love. They’ve built me up stronger than I could ever imagine and I feel blessed every day that I have them.

When commenting, be considerate and respectful of writers and fellow commenters. Try to stay on topic. Spam and comments that are hateful or discriminatory will be deleted. Our full commenting policy can be read here.