Staff Picks: Our favourite part of spring

Why we love the rainy season

These Journal staff can't get enough of the warmer weather.
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The snow is melting, the birds are chirping, and the sun is peeking out at us from behind the clouds. This can only mean one thing: spring is finally here.

Well, we might be getting a little ahead of ourselves, but it’s definitely on its way.

In the meantime, we’ve compiled some of The Journal’s staff members’ favourite things about the upcoming season. Hopefully, these odes to springtime will help get you ready for warmer weather and lots of rain.   

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“I always know spring is coming when my mom brings home potted spring flowers. Near the end of winter, crocuses, tulips, hyacinth, and especially daffodils start to appear in my living room, in bouquets on our dining room table, and on my desk. Spring in Canada can get kind of gross, with those icy remnants of winter snowbanks still lining the streets and wading through mud when walking to class, but spring flowers can make it all worth it.”

Amelia Rankine, production manager

 

“I’m so excited to wake up to something besides darkness! I want to get ready for an 8:30 a.m. class while the sun is shining, and I want to walk to campus when the sidewalk isn’t soaking wet because it snowed a week ago and the City of Kingston didn’t seem to hear the news.

I absolutely love that emo winter aesthetic and the accompanying stream of sweaters, but I’m anxious to put on a cute sundress and blast some upbeat tunes. It’s been a spectacularly cold few months here at Queen’s in more ways than one, but I’m ready for new beginnings.”

Aysha Tabassum, opinions editor

 

“It might be because I’m a Taurus, but I’ve always relished spring time. There’s not one thing I singularly love most about spring, but a collection of things, like the first time I walk barefoot in the grass, reading outside, lilac trees, riding my bike, and iced lemonades from Tim Hortons.

While I love the return of sunlight, I also love opening my window and listening to the sound of rain in spring time—not to mention walking outside in my yellow rubber boots.

Spring also just makes you feel like a person again. I become more social in spring time, and more willing to venture outside the depressing sphere of winter life that encapsulates solely my apartment, The Journal House, and the two buildings I have classes in.

Warmer weather means going for walks in Lake Ontario Park, going downtown to the farmer’s market, and taking the ferry to Wolfe Island with my friends for drinks and bike rides. Whimsy aside, my utilities bill will go down again, and I won’t be so broke all the time. Does that mean more money for iced lemonades?”

Raechel Huizinga, news editor

 

“Spring is when I start my day with a runny nose and puffy eyes due to allergies. Albeit this natural tragedy I was born to endure, one thing I look forward to in spring is finally wearing colors.

I look forward to putting away my big coats, and taking out my light jackets. I can’t wait to finally put on an outfit without needing to go back into my room and change into another warmer outfit because I’m naïve about the frigid Kingston winter. I can’t wait to finally put on a blazer without feeling like an idiot because I still need to put a big coat over it. I can’t wait to stop muttering ‘I hate Canadian weather’ under my breath every time I feel a cold gust of wind blowing directly at my face.”

Sydney Ko, assistant news editor

 

“My favourite part of the spring is the rain—I’m a big fan of dreary weather. I prefer overcast weather to sunny any day of the year, and, in the spring, you get the added bonus of the lessened glare from the bright snow. I also find the rainfall soothing. In the spring, I can finally put away those ‘rainy sounds studying compilations:’ the real thing is here. Plus, I feel like rainy weather creates a gloomy, angsty atmosphere that’s more than appropriate for exam season.

There’s little more cathartic than walking home from a tough exam listening to sad music in the pouring rain.” ‪ 

Shelby Talbot, editorials editor

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