Arts Archive: 2005

Marriage, motherhood and music

When listening to husband-and-wife-group Kyra and Tully’s music, it’s easy to understand why they chose the Grad Club for their self-titled CD release party. Their blend of ’60s-and-’70s-inspired folk music conveys a sense of intimacy that would be lost in larger, more impersonal venues. Unfortunately, that is a challenge they know all too well—both remember their days as a weekly Loblaws house band.Continue...

Life Lessons a stumbling success

Published by A Bicycle Made of Anarchy Press, an independent student press—administered by Lougheed himself and Grace O’Connell, also ArtSci ’06—this small publication is packed with poems that reflect, narrate, and provoke in ways that are confusing and blundering at times, but often poignant and refreshing.Continue...

Plaskett flies solo tomorrow

East Coast folk-rock sensation Joel Plaskett is really looking forward to his Saturday night performance in Dunning Auditorium. Although it will be a solo performance—without the aid of his trusty band, The Emergency—Plaskett is confident that his audience will enjoy themselves.Continue...

Cardiff: reviews are “masturbatory”

Craig Cardiff doesn’t want you to read this. In fact, he’d probably prefer that I not even write it. Thursday night may have been his last show in Kingston until March, but if you weren’t there, Craig Cardiff assumes you don’t care how it went.Continue...

Learning by example at Agnes

By today’s standards, to copy someone else’s work would be considered unoriginal—or even worse, plagiarism—but unlike literature, copying the work of another artist is actually encouraged in the art world. The small exhibit Imitation of the Artist in the Agnes Etherington’s Samuel J. Zacks Gallery exemplifies the tradition of both students and contemporaries by making use of others’ technique and knowledge to better their own artistic standing.Continue...

Cameras flash new material

The zombies taking the stage at The Grad Club last Thursday were nothing to run from, unless you happened to be afraid of the Lesbians on Ecstasy.Continue...

Award-winning group share world music

On Oct. 28 the award-winning Japanese drum stylings of Fubuki Daiko will be returning to Kingston. The four-person troupe promises its Kingston audience a fusion of traditional Japanese drumming, martial arts and raw energy.

The name “Fubuki Daiko” means “blizzard drums” and is representative of the group’s Winnipeg home base.Continue...

Here’s my Halloween mix tape

Good God, do I love Halloween. It’s a giant, marvellous amalgamation of so darn much greatness, like costumes, candy, fall, apple cider, pranks ... sigh. It’s easy to bemoan the fact that at university, “All Hallows’ Eve” generally validates what Lindsay Lohan said in Mean Girls: “Halloween is the one night a year when a girl can dress like a total slut and no other girls can say anything about it.” But remember the lovely Halloweens of yore? Back when Halloween was a holiday celebrating mischief, cool costumes, the supernatural and the gluttonous consumption of Aero and Coffee Crisp chocolate bars? Let’s bring back some Halloween memories with the official A&E Halloween Mix Tape—and maybe make some new ones.Continue...

Live Country at The Grad Club

As evidenced by the plethora of different artists represented onstage at the Broken Social Scene concert last week—including Feist, Sarah Harmer, and Jason Tate of The Weakerthans—Canadian musicians rarely confine themselves solely to one project. To witness another perfect example of this flexibility among artists, look no further than The Grad Club’s Halloween party this Saturday and one of two bands to be featured: Live Country Music.Continue...

Horror from around the world

’Tis the Halloween season, a time of year when you can indulge in disturbing horror cinema without feeling guilty about it. Unfortunately, all Hollywood has to offer in theatres right now are unnecessary video game adaptations ( Doom ) and PG-13 remakes ( The Fog ).Continue...

It’s a mod, mod world at Ale House

Sick of dancing to Black Eyed Peas’ My Humps? Join the club. Victoria van Eyk is determined to revamp Kingston’s club scene and show the city there is dancing beyond Kanye West.

Van Eyk, ArtSci ’07, escaped the generic sounds of the Kingston Hub for Toronto on the weekend where she enjoyed a more alternative music scene, rich with the likes of Bloc Party, Arcade Fire, and other alternative acts.Continue...

Elliott Brood chooses Oshawa

Evidently, the prospect of playing a half-hour set for thousands of GM workers politely pretending that they’re not just waiting for “Lost Together” was too enticing for Elliott Brood to resist, and so it was that fifteen mildly confused people filed into The Grad Club at 9:45 to the crunching hometown sounds of Ass Machine—or, more accurately, Ass Machine’s belated sound check, which became immediately apparent when the trio nonchalantly ambled over to the bar for a few more pints. After this brief introduction to Ass Machine, one could tell that the audience was regretting headliner Elliot Brood’s cancellation.Continue...

Liquor & Poker a low draw

Although the show was generally pretty intense, Clark Hall could’ve definitely used a lot more bodies. As the Illuminati’s Nick Sewell put it, “There must be some kind of fucked up calendar in Kingston. Here it’s Monday while everywhere else it’s Saturday and people are out having a good time.”Continue...

Exclaim tour offers a mix of talent

In a modern musical landscape where taste is generally dictated by iPod-toting, blog-reading disciples of online music ’zines such as Pitchforkmedia, it’s easy to question the potency of national music rags such as Exclaim . That doubt might make some cynical when Exclaim sponsors a national tour. But fear not— Exclaim ’s tour sticks to what it knows best: tried and tested Canadian indie rock.Continue...

Alumnus returns

Canadian writer and Queen’s alumnus Adrian Michael Kelly launched his first novel, Down Sterling Road , this month, to rave reviews from critics across Canada. Kelly, who grew up in Campbellford but now hails from Timmins, Ont., completed his MA in English at Queen’s in 2001, where he contributed to The Queen’s Quarterly . He moved to Alberta and pursued journalism, writing for the Calgary Herald and Alberta Views before writing his novel, which he started during a writing workshop in Calgary.Continue...

Vogt A lineup too ambitious

Shakespeare may have had a point when he suggested that “brevity is the soul of wit,” but he probably wasn’t picturing the Vogt Studio Series. A staple of the Queen’s drama department for years, the production series is noble in its aim to showcase student writers and actors, but the results aren’t always successful. Squeezing too much ambition into too short a time slot seems to be a common drawback of the series, and this year’s Slot A is no exception.Continue...

Crowded Scene at Grant Hall

Four years ago, Broken Social Scene was virtually unheard of. After seeing them perform at Grant Hall on Wednesday night, however, I get the feeling this is a band we’ll be reading about in history textbooks and telling our grandchildren about sometime in the distant future.Continue...

Dystopic glimpse of another culture

Stuffy, crowded subway cars with perverted salary men. Poser gangsters in plastic bathroom slippers and adolescent girls selling their own excretions to buy the designer bag of their dreams. This is the dystopic snapshot of Japan that Janice Valerie Young portrays in her novel Sweet Daruma: A Japan Satire.Continue...

Old influences, new record for Snakes

Toronto’s favourite garage rock collective, The Deadly Snakes, has returned with another offering. However, this isn’t the usual exhaust-fume-soaked, five-star whiskey-fuelled four-piece, banging away at power-chorded blues rock on improperly- tuned instruments.Continue...

FemBots release gem of an album

It’s always nice to see a hardworking band hit their stride and be rewarded for their effort.

With the release of their third album—The City—on Paper Bag Records last month, the FemBots are at last garnering the kind of attention that has seemed to come easily to some of their PB label mates, but has always (up to this point) appeared just out of reach for the veteran Toronto scenesters.Continue...

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