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The great gig in the sky

Unlike some other people on this list, Jeff Buckley is quite definitely dead—what’s more mysterious is
why. The idiosyncratic crooner was recording a follow-up to 1994’s critically-acclaimed Grace in 1997 when he drowned during a swim in the Wolf River Marina. An autopsy confirmed that there were no illegal drugs in Buckley’s system and the Buckley estate insists that alcohol was not involved either.Continue...

Political comedy fails to rock the vote

Just in time for the approaching U.S. state senator elections comes a movie about the politics of the south. With a former Hollywood actor-turned “The Governator” in California, and a growing media and tech-based culture, Man of the Year asks the question, could a celebrity comedian become president of the United States?Continue...

Uncut convert to Modern Currencies

While many bands take the opportunity to hone new material on the road, it’s far less common for a short tour to define an album so fundamentally.

Uncut hit the road in the fall of last year to open a handful of dates for Bob Mould (ex-Hüsker Dü). Brief as the shared tour was, the experience was “pretty illuminating,” according to Ian Worang, one of Uncut’s two singer/guitarists, who spoke to the Journal by phone from his day job in Toronto.Continue...

Mirror in the sky

Refreshing for its intelligence and modesty; exhausting because it’s thrilling, but difficult to follow his line of thought through his complicated answers to my questions; and perplexing because such a high level of self-examination and intelligence still didn’t prevent him from telling a NOW Magazine critic who didn’t like his latest album to “Eat a dick!”Continue...

World class mash-ups

Like the generations before him who became musicians after seeing a guitar virtuoso in performance,
D.R. One’s passion for deejaying started at a hip hop show when he was an impressionable 13-year-old. D.R. One started practising his craft after he purchased his first turntable set more than a decade ago. He learned different methods of deejaying by watching videos of other deejays, such as DJ Dusty of Ottawa, and imitating their techniques.Continue...

Anger makes serious point

When the characters finally do, the playwrights prove to be attentive students of human nature.
The Anger in Ernest and Ernestine isn’t for everybody—some will find its fever-pitched physical comedy profoundly irritating, and once its frothy first half is over, you won’t exactly leave the theatre feeling secure about your immediate social circle. But as an exploration of the claustrophobia in any close relationship, whether between lovers, friends or roommates, The Anger in Ernest and Ernestine is far more pointed than its goofy flailing might suggest.Continue...

Propagandhi still smiling

If you are or have ever been into punk, chances are pretty good you’ve come across Canadian punk legends Propagandhi.Continue...

All slasher, no feeling

Leatherface and his cannibalistic family, itself a glitzy remake of the original 1974 horror classic. Sicker, filthier and chock full of nasty, this film attempts to gross out its audience at every turn. Depending on how delicate your stomach is, it might succeed.Continue...

Celebrated film finally gets its due

Canadian films have a tendency to be boxed into unpleasant categories.

Labeled as boring, low-budget or even depressing, the canon of Canadian cinema is just plain misunderstood.

Clarke Mackey, head of the film studies department at Queen’s, begs to differ with this misunderstanding.Continue...

Scorsese departs from overblown style

By the time the title for The Departed appears on screen the audience has already seen documentary footage situating the film in the Boston underworld, two police trainees rising through the system, a childhood ruled by crime, an undercover policeman surreptitiously imprisoned in order to infiltrate an Irish gang, multiple murders, and several classic Jack Nicholson monologues.Continue...

Torngat tear it up

If, when asked to recall the last time you remember rocking out to a xylophone, memories of the earliest days of your childhood come to mind: you are really missing out on a cool hobby, and you obviously weren’t at the show.Continue...

Students find their Place in exhibit

Looking at the paintings displayed in the Union Gallery’s current exhibit, “Sense of Place,” one is immediately struck by the aptness of the show’s name.

The paintings irresistibly draw the viewer into the immediacy and authenticity of the places the images evoke: it’s hard not to imagine oneself there, as the situations are both potent and accessible--whether it’s a long car ride, a quiet moment in a campus café or an impending storm, we've all been thereContinue...

Opportunity Knock Knocks

If things work out for Milosz Sikora of Knock Knock Ginger, more people might really, really get his band after their Kingston date, the release of their second EP, and their first gig outside of Ontario at the Halifax Pop Explosion festival.Continue...

Henry’s national battle

Under the direction of Alex Dault, and with production from Liam Karry, Single Thread transfers Shakespeare’s Henry V into a familiar contemporary setting—1970s Quebec. Swords to guns, men to women, castles to skyscrapers, the 16th century to the 20th: there are endless attempts to convey Shakespeare in a more relevant light.Continue...

Barefoot and back to his roots

Brantford is to Nich Worby what barley is to beer.

The southwestern Ontario city seeps into the Queen's singer-songwriter’s work in one way or another whether he likes it or not, and his recent album, Oh, How? is no different.

More than over a year in the making, Worby released Oh, How? in September. The eighttrack disc put out by the Ford Plant, a Brantford venue/gallery/label that has a special place in Worby’s heart.Continue...

Young Ruffians play with Police Club

Things aren’t too shabby for the Born Ruffians. The three smalltown guys adopted Toronto as their
new home to pursue their teenage rock ’n’ roll dreams. Now, at the age of 20, the Born Ruffians have
a mini-UK tour under their belt, along with not one, but two label signings—XL Recordings (UK) and Warp Records (US). With the upcoming release of their six-song EP in October, the hyper rockpop act are just starting to feel the momentum.Continue...

Poetry ‘on the rocks’

“I knew that I couldn’t write about how red the robin’s breast was— and I’m not dissing poetry like
that, but for me, it was like, ‘I guess I’m not a writer because I can’t write about how beautiful the ice is when it freezes, but I can write about Bobby Brown and Whitney Houston breaking up.’”

And while countless robins may be feeling a little less red-breasted as a result, Krystle Mullin has done
well at doing her thing. The Queen’s graduate returns to The Grad Club on Friday night with the Toronto Poetry Slam Team, on their way to competing at the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word.Continue...

Trailer Park meets the big screen

There was a time when Canadian television was dominated by nature documentaries, educational films and light comic fare like the Royal Canadian Air Farce. Not anymore.Continue...

Magneta Lane stop at Queen’s

Before Magneta Lane’s show at Clark Hall Pub on Wednesday, singer and guitarist Lexi Valentine told me that she thinks playing in university towns is important because “they support bands like us.” Although dismally underattended thanks to the Queen’s Entertainment Agency’s brief poster promotion and, perhaps also for being scheduled mid-week, it was still a fun and engaging show.Continue...

Worthwhile after all

It’s immediately evident that the Agnes Etherington Art Gallery’s exhibit of painter Daniel Fowler’s work is more than just an art show: It’s a lesson in history, and an interpretation of what it means to
be Canadian.

Fowler, a 19th-century impressionist painter, came to Canada from the UK in 1843.

His paintings depict pastoral scenes from Amherst Island, where he lived.Continue...

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