Archive

Mays musically torpedoes Ale house

On Monday, the men of el Torpedo, guided by their fearless leader Matt Mays, were in Charlottetown where they won four East Coast Music Awards and played their hit “Cocaine Cowgirl” to close out the show. By Wednesday, Matt Mays and el Torpedo were at the Ale House, where they proved to everyone present exactly why each and every award they received was fully deserved.Continue...

Wits brush up on their Shakespeare

Someone in the audience watching the University Wits’ production of The Taming of the Shrew might notice something odd about the characters. Katherine is about a foot taller than her suitor, Petrucchio, who seems unusually buxom. And the bit of Bianca’s shin visible to the audience is quite hairy.Continue...

Diableros expose Olympic Hearts

Sitting in the comfy—if not a little cramped—apartment/practice space of the Diableros, on the outskirts of Toronto’s Kensington Market, drinking echinacea-laced tea with four of the six band members, you’d never know that the unassuming sextet are the city’s current critical darlings, nor that their debut album, You Can’t Break the Strings in Our Olympic Hearts (which can be streamed in its entirety on their website, thediableros.tv) was just released across the country only a few days earlier.Continue...

Metric measures up at Grant

White, white, white was the colour scheme of choice at Tuesday night’s Metric show at Grant Hall. Appropriate perhaps, given the icy winds and occasional blusters of snow outside.Continue...

Alum makes waves with debut novel

There must be something about Queen’s University and writers. From Robertson Davies, our illustrious grandfather of fiction, to contemporary aces like Russell Smith and Steven Heighton, Queen’s hovers like a proud, invisible godmother at bookstores around the world. In 2004, Robert McGill, ArtSci ’99, took up the literary torch with his stunning debut novel, The Mysteries .Continue...

Kenny Hotz is a bad person

Not everyone can claim that they make a living by forcing their best friend to eat his own vomit, but that’s exactly the path that Kenny Hotz’s life has taken. It’s certainly a detour for the Toronto native who began his career as a photographer.Continue...

Fat Robot’s victorious battle

Clark Hall Pub’s sizeable Battle of the Bands crowd was not quite hushed or attentive last Monday night as QEA Head Manager Aaron Libbey announced “And the judges’ scores ... ”Continue...

Trevstock: music and fun-draising

Trevstock is an annual concert that raises funds to send children with autism to camp, as well as train counsellors.Continue...

Storytelling class tells tales at Vogt

Everybody’s got a story to tell, but the question is: how do you tell 18 of them in one night?

Students of Queen’s drama department will tackle that very challenge this week as the DRAM 439 Storytelling class presents What’s Your Story? , a night of short scenes featuring oral stories told through a variety of mediums including song, dance and puppetry.Continue...

The poor writings on the Firewall

Harrison Ford’s latest performance helps to prop up an otherwise uninteresting motion picture. In this case, star power is a no-brainer. Unfortunately, so is the script. Firewall , aside from having a cool-sounding title that has nothing to do with the movie, resorts to pretentious computer lingo to play itself as being more intelligent than it actually is.Continue...

No place like home[made]

Some like the clichéd notion that “home is where the heart is,” while others prefer to think of home as the place where they grew up. What it ultimately comes down to is this: home is whatever you want it to be.Continue...

QSOC engages in lovely Dialogues

The Queen’s Student Opera Company (QSOC) production of Les Dialogues des Carmélites, playing tonight and tomorrow at Grant Hall, features a combination of these unlikely themes. Unlike most well-known operas—including those previously produced by QSOC—Poulenc’s 1956 work centers on religious devotion rather than love, hate and human relationships. Conversations about martyrdom, religion and death replace love duets and arias. With Les Dialogues des Carmélites, QSOC shows that it is as comfortable dealing with these traditionally un-operatic topics as it is on more familiar terraContinue...

Emotionally-honest Vogting

There are times when theatre can move you to unexpected feelings of satisfaction. Other times, you’re left wishing for resolution. The third installment of the Vogt series of student productions takes these two emotions and provides an honestly intimate look at what it feels like to be a person on the verge.Continue...

Vaginas everywhere unite

The vaginas are coming. They have a lot to speak about to you—well, to all of us. They’re on their way to Queen’s via The Vagina Monologues with the support of the Women’s Empowerment Committee.Continue...

Film unveils women’s strength

The seventh annual reelout Queer Film and Video Festival concluded this weekend after enjoying great success. At the premiere of Unveiled , by German filmmaker Angelina Maccarone, seats were sold out and many viewers risked back pain by sitting on the floor just to see this engaging film. Unveiled follows the story of forbidden love, exile and the strength of one woman determined to be free.Continue...

A CLAIHR approach to filmmaking

On September 6, 1995, First Nations protester Dudley George was shot and killed by police, while protesting over land at Ipperwash Provincial Park, west of London, Ont. His story, as well as the story of this disputed territory, is told in the film One Dead Indian, directed by Gemini-award winner Tim Southam. The film questions the state of human rights in Canada, which is an issue that Canadian Lawyers Association for International Human Rights (CLAIHR) strives to raise awareness about.Continue...

Tuning to the key of textbooks

Juggling coursework and a social life is more than enough for the average university student. Some even manage to take on jobs and/or romantic relationships. Then there’s Noah Fralick, ArtSci ’06, who hops the red-eye bus to Toronto in between term papers to make it to his band’s latest gig.

Fralick’s band, The Ride Theory, has been going strong since its Hamilton-based inception in 2002, despite the obstacles of geography and scheduling.Continue...

Grad Club crowd Control

Those lucky enough to have made it to The Grad Club last Saturday night were in for quite a show. With three bands playing, the show was well worth the money and time. Headliner Controller.Controller was supported by two opening bands—the upbeat Chicago-based quartet OK Go and Toronto-based trio Stop Die Resuscitate.Continue...

Reeling in the best films

“Like short stories, I think a good short film ... can be a really beautiful, succinct thing,” says Toronto-based director and film writer Cassandra Nicolaou, whose work will feature at the Reelout film festival closing gala this Sunday, Feb. 5.Continue...

Film not for the thin-skinned

For decades, stand-up comedians have shared a secret joke. Long after their shows were over and the audiences had left the club, comics used to break out this single joke to entertain each other. It is something that could never be said on stage, because it is without a doubt the most offensive joke ever told. Want to hear it? Picture the scene: 1930s, New York, the old vaudeville days. A guy walks into a talent agent’s office, looks the agent right in the eye and says, “Have I got an act for you.”Continue...

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