Archive

The Queen’s Players show must go on

This fall’s Queen’s Players performance might refer to Clark Hall Pub’s closure, but the show’s director, Simon Paabor, isn’t giving anything away.

An Inconvenient Truth About Clark and Dog is currently in rehearsals, gearing up for two weeks of shows in November at Time to Laugh Comedy Club at 394 Princess St.Continue...

Wilson brings poetry to life on stage

Performer-poet Sheri-D Wilson, one of Canada’s celebrated experimental artists, is responsible for paving the way for spoken word back in the ’80s. Though performing to the beat of her own drum with unique, jazzy words has garnered the Alberta native recognition, Wilson still forges ahead with her work and focuses on creating thriving artistic communities wherever she is.Continue...

Playing someone else’s game

The table-top role-playing game, Warhammer 40000, can be won and lost on the value of honour points, earned by killing enemies who were once good but have since become rebellious traiters.
The game—which is played using tiny metal figurines of soldiers and fantasy characters—and the morals and themes that it operates on, are at the centre of Ayaz Kamani’s time-based media installation, Someone Else’s Scene, which opens in the State of Flux room at Modern Fuel on Wednesday.Continue...

Hunter Valentine start rebellion

Toronto rock trio Hunter Valentine bring their gritty sound to the Grad Club tonight as part of EQuIP’s Queerientation. Though this concert marks their first time in Kingston, the band members love the road and have toured southern Ontario extensively.Continue...

Barricades uses music to keep water clean

At The Barricades isn’t just the title of a compilation CD produced by Wolfe Island resident and indie musician Chris Brown. It’s also the mantra for environmental justice group The Lake Ontario Waterkeeper. The grassroots organization, headed by environmental lawyer Mark Mattson, is one of 161 groups working globally to ensure peoples’ three basic rights to drink, swim and fish in clean water. Through negociating the legal system, Mattson and his charity fight, in court, for issues that affect the quality of Lake Ontario’s water.Continue...

Polaris takes Watson closer to paradise

On Monday night at the Phoenix Concert Theatre in Toronto’s east end, grand jury members for the Polaris Prize chose an unlikely candidate for the second year in a row. The award, which goes to the best Canadian album of the year, is based solely on artistic merit and comes with a $20,000 cheque.Continue...

Last days of summer spark art fest

It’s not often that small talk before class turns into a festive arts showcase, but for some education students, that’s exactly what happened.

Kate Dickson, ArtSci ’07, was sitting with some friends in a classroom, waiting for their music course to begin and talking about the beautiful weather that stretched from the summer into September.Continue...

Remake rescues the Western

Like the afternoon clock ticking away towards its deadline or the train steaming ominously along its tracks, 3:10 to Yuma is unapologetically relentless. This is the only apt way to describe James Mangold’s remake of the 1957 classic western with the same name. From start to finish, it doesn’t once let up, berating the audience with its fiery intensity. A worthy addition to the American Western mythology, Mangold’s film is in no way a mere homage to what has gone before. Rather, 3:10 to Yuma stands confidently as a psychologically intense thrill-ride that returns an urgent relevancy to the Western tradition.Continue...

Laviolette takes a chance, makes friends and music

Tonight’s concert at the Sleepless Goat is an indication of the value of building friendships through common interests.

Richard Laviolette, Chris Yang and Jordaan Mason are friends first and fellow musicians second. Their performance tonight will kick off their seven-week tour of Canada and the U.S.

For Laviolette and Yang, this tour is a return to their old ways. The two singer-songwriters have been touring together on and off for almost two years across North America.Continue...

Band still evolving and breaking waves

The Junction have seen a lot of changes since their conception as a high school jazz outfit in their hometown Brampton, Ontario back in 1997, but they’re learning to roll with the punches. Some things have stayed the same such as core members guitarist and vocalist Brent Jackson, bassist Matt Jameson and drummer Mike Taylor and the group’s mutual love for defying parameters.Continue...

Rock & Roll Report Card

You’d think by the time you reach your mid- to late-twenties the teenage angst would subside but Tegan and Sara prove all that darkness doesn’t pass, it just takes on new shapes and sounds.

With their new album The Con, the twins channel self-reflective lyrics, often looking back at their teenage years (“Nineteen,” “Like O, like h” and “Are You Ten Years Ago”), and twist them into impossibly catchy indie new wave tunes ranging from anxious to whimsical.Continue...

Dance not so square after all

For most of us, square dancing brings back uncomfortable recollections of gym classes, where, clad in gym shorts and T-shirts, we would stand awkwardly and worry about sweaty palms, waiting for the P.E. teacher to press play on the cassette player.

Old-time string duet Sheesham and Lotus are looking to change that by holding the first of what they hope to be a series of square dances this Saturday night on Wolfe Island.Continue...

Bats fuel ‘cultural factory’

When orchestrating the details of a group exhibit, a curator will often find him or herself overwhelmed with the endless possibilities of creative show-naming. An imaginative title could be evocative of substance, medium, and art form, or a vague connection between underlying themes intent on reiterating a not-so-subtle concept. Or it could just be catchy.Continue...

Reeling in what TIFF had to offer

The 2007 edition of the Toronto International Film Festival is now officially over. Paris Hilton is safely out of the country and the most exciting thing going on in the Canadian film world is once again Ryan Reynolds. There’s nothing more left for me to do but wrap up my coverage of the festival and also my career at the Journal. Bad news for me, because I’ll have no one left to publish my rants about movies, but good news for you because you’ll never again have to read them. Stay classy, Queen’s.Continue...

Visser’s art and ideas ‘flow together’

I guess I would be considered an installation artist. I use a lot of paper-based materials, and text, video and sound. I really like wood and fabric too but I haven’t been using that lately which is based on the fact that I don’t currently have a studio.Continue...

One night of art, music and film

This weekend, the 24-hour mixed media event Tidal Mass took place at NGB Studios, in a dilapidated former warehouse at 12 Cataraqui St. Local musicians played music continuously from midnight until 5 a.m., large-scale sculptures were on display and silent films from the 1920s and ’30s were shown.Continue...

Lighting up the silver screens at TIFF

The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) kicked off last week, bringing some of the best and worst films of 2007 to Canada for a paparazzi-saturated celebration of cinema. This is the first entry in a two-part series of reviews of some of the films featured in this year’s fest. I saw them so that you didn’t have to suffer through the misery of doing so and, man, was it ever tough.Continue...

Tidal Mass makes waves

A few blocks north of Princess, on a street with no sidewalks and cracked pavement, a massive brick building stands in a romantic state of decay. It’s a space where it’s easy to imagine the ghosts of the past standing near, in a somehow more authentic way than Kingston’s history usually delivers.Continue...

Dragonette play with pop, gender and sex

Fresh off the stages of this year’s Hillside, Virgin Fest and Osheaga, Dragonette roar into Kingston on Saturday.

The pop-electronica band is the love-child of musicians and married couple Martina Sorbara and Dan Kurtz, who play alongside friends Joel Stouffer on guitar and Will Stapleton on drums.Continue...

Modern Fuel show goes the distance

A nation doesn’t need UN approval to be recognized as a country or to recruit citizens. Nomadsland and The State of Sabotage, two micro-nations, loosely defined as multidisciplinary art projects, have been recruiting citizens since 2003 and have come to Kingston to find more open-minded participants.Continue...

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