Archive

All quiet on the campus front

Changes to Kingston’s musical climate in the last few years seem to have had an impact on the campus music scene, although fluctuations in the campus band circuit are subject to different factors. As many venues off campus close, pare down their concert schedule or shift genres, the campus band scene has become a victim of attrition.Continue...

This is what a feminist review looks like

The Queen's Feminist Review effectively interprets the essentially feminine experience of searching to put all aspects of self into one coherent persona.Continue...

The Creepshow rolls into Kingston

Lock your doors, board up your windows and head for the cellar, because The Creepshow are rolling into Kingston with their frenetic, horror-filled, zombie-fuelled brand of psychobilly.Continue...

Journey to the centre of your mind

A Dream Play is technically stunning, with a dynamic cast in the wake of grounded emotional content, says The Journal's Brandon Thao.Continue...

Snyder’s violent eye candy

In 1962, the glorious and quintessentially classic story about the Battle of Thermopylae was told in the Ben-Hur-styled epic The 300 Spartans . Forty-five years later, that same story of antiquity has been given a not-so-subtle shot of steroids in Zach Snyder’s 300 . Rather than being shot on location halfway around the globe, 300 was simply shot in a single green room in Montreal, following the lead of Robert Rodriguez’ Sin City .Continue...

Cabaret turns into circus

For their winter production, Queen’s Musical Theatre chose to delve into the Berlin stories of Fred Ebb and John Kander’s infamous Cabaret. From smoky parlours to lively dance numbers, Cabaret has it all—and QMT is ready to indulge. “I think Cabaret has a lot of relevance—the original was in 1966—and 40 years later it still holds meaning in society,” said Kat Sandler, ArtSci ’08, and director of Cabaret.Continue...

Not your Great Aunt’s folk rock

Emerging from her post-rock days improvising with Beans and her time spent merging new wave and country in The Buttless Chaps, Vancouverite Ida Nilsen founded another project to play the music she was writing. Settling into a subtle, modern folk vibe, Nilsen’s current band, Great Aunt Ida, takes its place not in a rocking chair, but on stage. What Nilsen has to share on Great Aunt Ida’s latest album, How They Fly , is a set of convincing, earnest stories expressed through simple, strange lyrics and understated arrangements of bass, guitar, piano, drums and trumpet.Continue...

Live music scene quiets down

Only a couple of years ago, music fans in Kingston had to expertly budget both their time and money in order to balance their concert calendars.

But lately it seems easier on the wallet and the datebook to get to just about every show in town.

Even The Grad Club, a local live music staple, is scaling back the number of shows it books in a year.Continue...

Highlights from KingCan

Another year, another successful Kingston Canadian Film Festival. Here are reviews of some of the highlights from this year’s festival.Continue...

Something completely different

With the year’s third and final instalment of the Vogt Studio Series, the student-run program has
abandoned any pretense of clarity for the perplexingly bizarre. With three pieces ranging from a Samuel Beckett reproduction to a studentconceived sound spectacle, Vogt C is worth the trip for the sheer novelty of the experience.Continue...

Swimmers dive into Ongiara

Sit down with Tony Dekker, the brains behind Great Lake Swimmers, and in one phrase, he’ll tell you everything you need to know about his music: “Stop, listen and feel.”

Without whiny self-indulgence, Dekker’s Great Lake Swimmers explore the human condition on their third album, Ongiara. Much like their two previous albums, Great Lake Swimmers (2003) and Bodies and Minds (2005), Ongiara taps into a familiar melancholy that Dekker is quick to admit.Continue...

Debauchery and schmoozing

This past weekend’s Canadian Music Week (CMW)—an industry-driven vehicle for the nearly 600 bands that showed up to play 40 Toronto music venues, consisted of three days of bars serving until 4 a.m., longer lineups than many of these bars see all year, and equal parts debauchery and schmoozing.Continue...

No crown for Hamlet

There’s something rotten in the Wellington Street Theatre—and it’s Bottle Tree Productions’ presentation of Hamlet. Hamlet is definitely an enormous undertaking for any theatre company, and it’s clear that each cast member put many hours into memorizing lines and stage movements. It’s unfortunate that the same level of effort wasn’t evident in the rest of the production.Continue...

Junction create time capsule

After seven years together, the Brampton band has finally released their first full-length album, a self-titled follow-up to 2004’s EP. Inspired by the small-room feel of albums like Nirvana’s In Utero and Pearl Jam’s Vitalogy , the three-piece recorded the album’s instrumentals off the floor in nine days, an intentional departure from the process behind the EP.Continue...

Poet presents mature fable

The Canadian film industry may not have the rich production opportunities or star systems of Hollywood, but every year it manages to produce a few memorable little movies, even if poor distribution prevents most people from seeing them. Canadian filmmakers may have government funding, but the money and audiences just aren’t sufficient to support a substantial industry. Still, the movies are out there—you just have to work a little harder to see them.Continue...

Local Shorts feature penguins, robbers and more

If life worked out as planned, Ashley Hobb would be the next Steven Spielberg; Breean Hougesen would be practicing botany in a biochemistry lab; and Dave Bedrich wouldn’t even be in Kingston. Fortunately for the Local Shorts program, they’ve all been brought together for the Kingston Canadian Film Festival ...Continue...

Artists think inside the box

40x30 is the name, theme and the only request curator Jeremy Mulder had of the artists in The Artel’s current gallery show. An open-ended and open-minded concept, the show brings together the diverse voices of 10 mostly emerging Kingston artists in one room to be expressed in the allotted frame of 40 inches by 30 inches.Continue...

Exclusively Canadian fare

From an Academy Award winner to Degrassi Junior High, the Kingston Canadian Film Festival takes the idea of Canadian content to a whole new level.

The annual festival, now in its seventh year, features only Canadian content. In fact, the Kingston Canadian Film Festival is the largest exclusively Canadian film festival in the country.Continue...

In-Flight Safety takes off

It’s been an eventful few weeks for Halifax’s In-Flight Safety. In February, their video for “The Coast Is Clear” received a Juno nomination for Video of the Year.

Less than two weeks ago, they took home three East Coast Music Awards—for Group Recording
of the Year, Alternative Recording of the Year, and CBC GALAXIE Rising Star Recording of the Year—
and performed live at the nationally televised ceremony.Continue...

Nourishment from Montreal

Picking up where bands like The Hives and The Mooney Suzuki left off, Les Breastfeeders are all about
having a good time. Combining the simple, repetitive riffs and casual sensibility of garage rock with the ferocity of ’70s punk, Les Breastfeeders have earned fans and friends by just being themselves.

Like their label mates and fellow Montrealers Malajube, who were shortlisted for the Polaris Prize last
year, they sing in French, but lead guitarist Sunny Duval insists that singing in their native tongue has never been a problem.Continue...

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