Archive

Parallel world is brought closer to home

The notion of home as a house—a nice sturdy structure within which lives develop and children grow up—is rarely questioned. But Parallel World: The Architecture of Survival, the latest exhibit on display at the Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre, reminds us that homes are often anything but permanent.Continue...

Contaminated art

Currently on display at the Union Gallery, contaminations features artwork by Chrissy Poitras and Klaudio Shita.Continue...

Toronto boy sings the blues

Justin Rutledge is a big city boy with a small town soul. The 29-year-old country singer with a mellow voice and the rustic charm to go along with it hails from Toronto.

His latest album, The devil on a bench in Stanley Park, is nominated for the Roots and Traditional Album of the Year: Solo Juno award. He’s opening for Kathleen Stewart Tuesday at the Grad Club. His third album, Man Descending, is also scheduled for Canadian release April 8.Continue...

Suburban bestiality

Ninelives’ risqué production of Edward Albee’s The Goat or, Who is Sylvia explores the taboo topic of bestiality in one of the more provocative pieces of theatre the Queen’s community has produced in a while.Continue...

Rock and Roll Report Card

There’s something inexplicably endearing about a classically trained vocalist who can appreciate the distorted, gritty sounds produced by a cheap keyboard. But with a musical history that includes singing in the Canadian Children’s Opera Choir and a stint in the late-’90s girl group, Galaxy, Katie Stelmanis isn’t your average former opera singer.Continue...

Vogt slot struggles to challenge any conventions

The goal of this year’s Vogt C producers was to challenge traditional theatre conventions. Unfortunately, only one of the four plays even remotely succeeded.

Nell Corrigan, ArtSci’08, oversaw all of the Vogt productions this year as one of the series’ producers. She said each play in the latest installment of Vogt takes a different approach to questioning these conventions.Continue...

Sketch comedy troupe overplayed

Underplayed Theatre Company’s UnPilot, their first official production as an AMS-affiliated club, is a little underwhelming.

Television-themed, the show features an awkward pre-show, delving into the oft-unexplored realm of meta-sketch comedy as a few of the cast members mingle with the audience, cameramen and each other, presumably in an attempt to set a “before the camera rolls” atmosphere.Continue...

Care Failure: this is what success sounds like

Care Failure, the dynamic front girl of the alternative rock band Die Mannequin, doesn’t have a degree to fall back on but doesn’t care—musical success is Failure’s only option.Continue...

Shift in submissions evokes depth

It’s the dark and alluring Outwrite cover art that will draw you in to the publication’s fourth volume. It’s the exploration, at times conversely subtle and overt, of themes old, new, political and emotional that will hold youIt’s the dark and alluring Outwrite cover art that will draw you into the publication’s fourth volume. It’s the exploration, at times conversely subtle and overt, of themes old, new, political and emotional that will hold your attention and urge you to delve deeper into the work.
r attention and urge you to delve deeper into the work.Continue...

A quiet finale for QEA

If you’ve been wondering why the Queen’s Entertainment Agency has kept a low profile this year, it’s because the service has been taking a quiet bow out.Continue...

Plastic People players pack a satirical punch

The Plastic People Theatre Company is determined to go out with a bang—or two.

Punchline, the latest and last of the theatre company’s performances, pulls out all the stops, taking Plastic People’s traditional absurdism, social commentary and unapologetic vulgarity to new heights.

The play focuses on the exploits of two news anchors, each determined to fill the lone spot available at the news desk of NTV: National News Television.Continue...

Queen’s grads chronicle birth of an indie film

For the filmmakers behind The Death of Indie Rock, life imitates art. Making the film, which tells the story of a small-town rock band looking to make it big, has been a three-year long lesson in the trials of independent movie-making for the group of Queen’s graduates who wrote, directed, produced and acted in the film.Continue...

What’s so funny?

Who: Jim Robinson, ArtSci ’08.

Medium: Comedy.

Where you’ve seen him: Time To Laugh’s Comedian Idol contest, Queen’s Players, Queen’s Varsity Improv, Eng Week’s Gong Show at Alfie’s.Continue...

D’urbervillin’

A sweet indie release does not a full-time rock star make. Though they’re about to embark on their first cross-Canada tour with their newly released album We Are The Hunters on Out Of This Spark Records, the D’Urbervilles boys are keeping their day jobs for now, anyway.Continue...

Family blends voices

For Kate and Anna McGarrigle music constitutes more a lifetime than a lifestyle. The sisters have been playing and making their original, bilingual folk-rock music ever since they began their band together in Montreal during the early 1970s.Continue...

Fragmented films

This weekend, Kingston will encounter a loud-mouthed cabdriver, an indie-rock band trying to make it big and a teenager looking for her lost brother as the Kingston Canadian Film Festival unfolds throughout the city. With 19 feature films, 17 local shorts and a number of meet-and-greets and workshops with filmmakers, KingCan promises a busy weekend for film aficionados.Continue...

Hope and heartbreak, circa 1918

Most would agree that a story about the Spanish flu pandemic isn’t exactly the stuff comedy is made of. But Unity (1918), staged by Queen’s Drama Department and directed by Tim Fort, manages to inject both humour and hope into a grim story of the ravages of war and disease.Continue...

Sibling rivals find their harmony

Most family road trips spell disaster. But if you’re Jill and Matt Barber, it means nothing but good times and music on the road. The siblings, who’ve established themselves and toured as musicians independently of each other over the past few years, are now teaming up for their first-ever combined cross-country tour.Continue...

Cabaret kicks off

Cabaret conjures up a hazy picture of a smoke-filled nightclub, a circus of performers oozing seduction and an enchanted and intoxicated audience. While its modern embodiment retains the sass, it ups the politics, setting the stage for a variety of acts from spoken word to tap-dancing to fire-spinning with playful gender-bending and sex worker-positive themes.Continue...

Here’s to being here

From speaking with him, it’s clear that for Jason Collett, home is where the heart is, and his heart lies with his friends. In fact, his integral role as a member of the Canadian rock supergroup Broken Social Scene rarely goes unmentioned in interviews—but that doesn’t seem to faze him.Continue...

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