Archive

Canadian government should tax a sweet tooth

Sugar taxes aren’t about punishment—they nudge people toward less sugary alternatives.Continue...

Don’t give up on print media just yet

Diminishing print success has made traditional media outlets across Canada vulnerable, and the federal government has taken note.Continue...

In defense of boring lectures

Disliking a room packed with 200 people at 8:30 a.m. is no reason to give up on lectures.Continue...

Social media shouldn’t validate your experiences

If we don’t post our daily experiences on Instagram, Snapchat, or Facebook, they didn’t really happen.Continue...

McGill athletics’ name challenge is long overdue

In the case of McGill University’s Redmen sports teams, the name carries the impact of unadulterated racism—regardless of its intent.Continue...

Kingston leaves homeless women in the cold

A person sleeping on a bench or asking for change doesn’t capture the full scope of homelessness.Continue...

Learning to code decrypts endless advantages

Whether you’re an artist designing a website or an astronomer observing the galaxy, computer science impacts every discipline.Continue...

Arts students should be prepared for employment, not excluded

Students pursuing liberal arts degrees face more criticism than their peers in other disciplines because of their major’s perceived irrelevance in the job market.Continue...

Secret Uber recordings threaten passenger comfort

While dashboard cameras are installed in cars to protect safety, they’re not there to infringe on privacy.Continue...

Apathy toward climate change more harmful than we think

Acknowledging the damages of climate change is a first step—but acknowledgment without immediate action accomplishes nothing.Continue...

Facebook fact-checkers impact more than fake news

Facebook’s expanded fact-checking practice doesn’t overstep the line, but it does call public media literacy into question.Continue...

Academic quality takes precedent over precarious professorship

Job security for professors encourages a culture of personalized knowledge—but across Canada, that isn’t yet a consistent reality.Continue...

Prescribed museum visits an easy pill to swallow

For patients in need of comfort, prescriptions for free museum visits could beat the blues of illness.Continue...

App unnecessary for better voter turnout

An app pressuring friends into voting is the wrong solution to low voter turnout, but it’s a step in the right direction.Continue...

Mandatory class attendance overlooks working students

Mandatory courses with required attendance only add stress in an already high-pressure environment—especially for working students.Continue...

There’s no need for inconsistent dress codes

A dress code that interrupts class to call a skirt “distracting” isn’t just unproductive—it’s inappropriate.Continue...

SFU security policy compromises emergency response

When a student goes into medical distress mid-exam, it’s fair for their classmates to assume university protocols will provide swift care.Continue...

Nixing Violence Against Women program derails safety

A provincial government that asserts its leadership by scrapping valuable social policies without any replacement endangers its population.Continue...

Universities have a responsibility to care for students’ mental health

Universities have a responsibility to provide accessible, timely, and professional mental health care to students—but Queen’s misses the mark.Continue...

Low-income students should have the right to pay tuition themselves

Using student loans to pay tuition fees enables students to spend money responsibly. Taking that ability away manifests stereotypes about how low-income students can’t manage their money.Continue...

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