Archive

Mixed reactions to Homecoming policing

More than a week after Homecoming, the causes and consequences of the events on Aberdeen Street on Saturday night remain a hot topic among students and alumni.

Over the past week, the Journal has received more than 30 letters from students and alumni commenting on what took place.Continue...

PhysEd team captures the faculty

Strategy was the name of the game Saturday night as students from seven faculties took a break from homework to play a gigantic game of Capture the Faculty.

In the event’s third year running, the PhysEd team won the campus-wide version of capture the flag, reclaiming their title after being defeated by the Nursing Science Society last year.Continue...

Experts weigh in on Homecoming

As the dust settles after Homecoming, faculty members at Queen’s are offering a variety of explanations for why celebrations on Aberdeen Street Oct. 24 got out of control.

Vincent Sacco, a professor in the sociology department, said the street party is an example of a “celebratory riot,” which are occuring with increasing frequency at American colleges.Continue...

Hitchcock addresses Aberdeen residents

Principal Karen Hitchcock spoke to a group of about 50 Aberdeen Street student residents yesterday evening in Richardson Hall.

Students were called to the meeting via a personally addressed letter.
Reporters from the Journal and another student who wasn’t an Aberdeen resident weren’t permitted to attend the meeting. Names of summoned attendees were cross-checked against a list of known residents.Continue...

MCRC requests $100,000 to refurbish common rooms

Students living in crowded residences might soon experience relief—in the form of new common room TVs and couches—if a bid by the Main Campus Residents’ Council (MCRC) is passed by the University.

In a report given at the Sept. 12 MCRC General Assembly, President Alexis Meyerman said she sent a memo requesting $100,000 from the Senate Residence Committee (SRC). MCRC wants to use the money to improve conditions in the packed facilities, she told the Journal .Continue...

City suggests cancelling Homecoming

In response to Saturday’s unsanctioned Aberdeen Street party, permanent residents and the mayor are proposing the city either bring in increased force or cancel next year’s Homecoming altogether.

In a statement to the press, Mayor Harvey Rosen called the future of the annual festivities into question.Continue...

MyQueen's website coming soon

Students and faculty alike will find individual exam schedules, concert listings, and customized University content all in one place as early as January, thanks to a new University wide web portal.

The site, which will be unveiled Jan. 5, is a project of Information Technology Services (ITS).Continue...

USAT course evaluations to be reviewed

Students know the end of term is near when they fill out orange course evaluation forms, but once they hand in their surveys to the DSC reps, they typically have no idea what the results are.

That process is about to undergo a makeover.

A committee of student representatives, faculty members and administrators will be meeting to change and improve the current course evaluation process, called the University Survey of Student Assessment of Teaching (USAT).Continue...

Professor’s letter draws fire

A Queen’s professor has drawn criticism from campus groups over comments she made in a letter published on Wednesday in the Toronto Star .

In her letter, Adèle Mercier, a professor in the philosophy department, wrote that the scene she witnessed on Aberdeen Street on Saturday night “filled me with revulsion never felt before.” Mercier also wrote: “[I was disgusted] at the thought that I devote my life to teaching students who turn into numbskulls worthy of the Hitler youth at the drop of a beer keg.”Continue...

Aberdeen revelers from near and far

The spreading notoriety of Aberdeen Street parties of years past likely contributed to the crowds that amassed there Saturday night, according to students and local transport officials interviewed by the Journal .

Dubbed a “phenomenal party” and “the street to go to” by some non-Queen’s students, this year’s gathering drew partiers from across Ontario and Eastern Canada, as well as local high school students.Continue...

AMS reaffirms JComm commitment

In the wake of Homecoming weekend, student-run non-academic discipline has come under increased scrutiny.

On Monday, the University met with student representatives to discuss its desire to allow the cases of students who breach the Queen’s Code of Conduct to be transferred to the University Student Appeal Board (USAB) without Judicial Committee (JComm) investigation.Continue...

Online alternative to bookstore

The thought of students shelling out $200 or more for a textbook motivates Yale Fox, ArtSci ’07 and Matthew McWhirter, Comm ’07, to go to work in the morning. The two students are the founders of smartandbroke.com, an online textbook marketplace.Continue...

War protesters march on campus

Local anti-war group Peace Kingston and its on-campus affiliate Queen’s Against War joined thousands of people worldwide on Saturday afternoon in what the Canadian Peace Alliance deemed a “day of action against the wars.”

The groups held an anti-war rally at Stauffer Library before marching peacefully to City Hall.Continue...

Artwork encourages safer sex

Local artist Joseph Babcock has been crafty for several decades, but only in the last two weeks has he started using condoms as a medium for his artwork.

Last Thursday, the Sutherland Room in the JDUC became a space for anything but a typical art class, with about 25 students joining Babcock to test the true versatility of the prophylactic. The event was one of several this month held as part of Queerientation.Continue...

AIDS walk brings out support

Almost 50 members of the University and Kingston communities came together Sunday evening for the 14th annual AIDS Walk For Life to raise money for HARS and increase awareness about HIV/AIDS in the local community.

HARS provides education and support to individuals affected by HIV/AIDS and promotes HIV/AIDS awareness and education in Kingston and the surrounding area. HARS is based in Kingston, but its catchment area is Belleville to the west, Brockville to the east and Sharbot Lake to the north.Continue...

Kingston women ‘Take Back the Night’

Women in Kingston took over the streets Friday night with spirit and energy for the annual Take Back the Night event.

Those taking part in the women-only march rallied in Confederation Basin before marching up Queen Street to Clergy Street and back down Princess Street, blowing whistles and noisemakers and chanting cheers such as “hey mister, mister, get your hands off my sister” and “hey hey, ho ho, rape and violence have got to go.”Continue...

Aberdeen strategy questioned

In the aftermath of one of the largest, wildest and most heavily policed Aberdeen Street Homecoming parties of recent years, organizations who worked together over the past year in an effort to scale down illegal activity have committed themselves to figuring out what went wrong.Continue...

‘This is not a tradition’

Around 2 a.m. on Sunday morning, George Hood, vice-principal (advancement), leans against a police cruiser stationed on William Street east of Aberdeen Street.

Donning a yellow baseball cap marked “Homecoming 2005 Volunteer,” he surveys the enormous mass of people gathered just metres away in the heart of the Ghetto.Continue...

News In Brief

A temporary power reduction in the south-east corner of campus, which began yesterday, will be in effect until Wednesday, Sept. 21. Buildings to be affected include the Biosciences Complex, Botterell Hall, Cancer Research Institute, Humphrey Hall and the Louise D. Acton Building.Continue...

‘Glimmer of light’ budget praised

This year, for the first time since 1999, the University budget wasn’t cut. The Board of Trustees approved a 2005-06 operating budget of $283.9 million on June 13. The budget actually increased by 6.1 per cent over last year, equating to an additional $16.4 million for the University.Continue...

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