Archive

Fire and Rescue to monitor keg parties

Kingston Fire and Rescue announced yesterday they will be actively monitoring house and keg parties in the Ghetto over Homecoming weekend to discourage overcrowding. The owner of any locale—including houses and tents—found to have more people in it than the occupancy load allows could be ordered to get rid of the overflow or face prosecution and possible fines under the Fire Prevention and Protection Act.Continue...

University tops satisfaction survey

For the first time last year, Canadian schools took part in The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), which has been conducted for the past five years at more than 900 higher education institutions across the United States.Continue...

Energy-efficient homes to be living labs

A handful of students may find themselves living as lab rats next year—with the environment in mind. Three houses will be upgraded to conserve energy. The project will retrofit three older student houses around campus with energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies.Continue...

Hundreds run Marathon of Hope

After losing his leg to cancer, Terry Fox decided to run across Canada from coast to coast to raise money for cancer research. He had to abandon his Marathon of Hope after the cancer spread to his lungs. He died on June 28, 1981. An estimated 600 participants gathered to run the annual Terry Fox Run at Queen’s University on Sunday.Continue...

Public broadcasting put to the test

For the past 36 days, 5,500 CBC staff—ranging from hosts and reporters to technicians, makeup artists and set designers—have been in a labour dispute with management.

Staff at Friday’s demonstration wore nametags and T-shirts depicting a gagged and chained cartoon character, framed by the slogan “Bring back the CBC—Call your MP.” Many also carried picket signs, bullhorns and union banners.Continue...

Police prepare for Homecoming

During Orientation Week, more than 110 charges were laid against students in the Ghetto for Liquor Licence Act infractions, including open alcohol, public intoxication and underage drinking, as well as charges for noise bylaw infractions and a single ticket for jay-walking.Continue...

Comm officer resigns

Danny Saposnik, ArtSci ’07, officially resigned from his position as AMS communications officer last Saturday. He added he still has a great relationship with the AMS. Last year, Saposnik was deputy prosecutor for the AMS Prosecutor’s Office. In January, he became chief prosecutor after Ethan Rabidoux, who formerly held the position, was elected AMS president.Continue...

Campus taps into drinking debate

Chris Groten, ArtSci ’09, arrived at Queen’s just two weeks ago, but he already feels he’s missing out on part of university life. With most of the class of 2009 underage, Groten is not alone. As of Sept. 1, 86 per cent of first-year students were under the age of 19, according to Rebecca Mezciems, assistant to the University Registrar.Continue...

EQuIP plays host to Queerientation

EQuIP—or Education on Queer Issues Project—located in the Grey House at 51 Bader Lane, is a committee of the Social Issues Commission (SIC) of the AMS. It promotes a positive environment for queer students and for queer communities in Kingston.Continue...

CBC lockout comes to campus

CBC staff may be locked out of work, but that hasn’t stopped employees from coming to Kingston to do what they do best.

More than 100 network employees are expected to visit the University today for a radio broadcast and rally.Continue...

Building bridges with Lego

Six engineers out to break a record are asking the public to dig through their childhood toy chests.

The team is working to accumulate enough Lego blocks to build a bridge spanning up to six metres—surpassing efforts of a previous team who built a three-metre bridge.

But that’s not their only goal.Continue...

News In Brief

The University received a financial boost last week with a new $9.1 million investment from the provincial government. The money, announced on Sept. 8, is part of the $250 million designated for colleges and universities this year by Chris Bentley, minister of training, colleges and universities.Continue...

Cross-Country Campus Briefs

New research at the University of Toronto suggests that even a single exposure to the common club drug speed can cause neurological birth defects in babies.Continue...

Health Services moves to family plan

Both first-year and returning students will be greeted with new documents to sign and a package of information to read upon their first visit to Health Services this school year.

Health, Counselling and Disability Services, located in the LaSalle Building, made the decision to adopt a ‘Family Health Group’ (FHG) model over the summer.Continue...

Downtown business is booming

A sharp increase in Nalgene water bottle sales heralds the return of students, according to staff working at downtown camping and wilderness store Trailhead. It’s one of many notable signs that almost 15,000 students are once again descending upon Kingston eager to fill their bellies, furnish their homes and clothe their bodies.Continue...

Weekend continues charges in Ghetto

Students continued to get ticketed by the police the weekend before school started, raking in a total of 35 charges from Thursday to Sunday nights.

Kingston police spokesperson Mike Weaver said the number was a marked decrease from the 77 tickets handed out over the course of three nights at the start of Orientation Week.Continue...

Frosh canvass city for charity

When a father in need called out to the community last week, students from the class of 2009 answered with $26,000 in donations from Shinerama.

Brian Childerhose, vice-president of the Kingston chapter of the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, made an emotional appeal Saturday morning to the large group.Continue...

Girls Gone Wild tour skips Kingston

A campus and community bracing for an X-rated film company’s visit to Kingston can put its mind at ease.

Mantra Films Inc., the producers of Girls Gone Wild, completed a Canadian tour this month without making an anticipated stop in the city.Continue...

A slow pole climb for Sci ’09

As a tired but undefeated crowd broiled under Sunday’s hot sun, Matt Stanyon, Sci ’09, scaled the human tower, stretching his lanky frame to grasp a tightly-nailed-on tam. Getting a good grip, Stanyon dangled from the top of the Grease Pole, using his body weight as leverage to yank it from side to side. At the last moment, he secured some necessary support under his feet, successfully ripping off a large piece and ending the faculty of applied science’s annual challenge.Continue...

News In Brief

University professor Hugh Segal has been appointed to the Canadian Senate as a member of the Conservative Party of Canada. The appointment, announced on Aug. 2, is another accolade for the professor, who was named to the Order of Canada in 2003.Continue...

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