Archive

Alfie’s: What’s in a name?

There are two ways to evaluate what Alfie Pierce meant to the University, said Allison Williams,
AM S social issues commissioner. “There’s the happy alumni story camp where Alfie was this
happy-go-lucky guy and the University swooped in and saved him from a life of hardship,” Williams said. “There’s the other camp where he lived in the boiler room with Boo Hoo the Bear.”Continue...

New focus for frosh leader training

Next year’s frosh leaders might be in store for a more inclusive hiring and training process after a
workshop ended prematurely for some frosh leaders this year. The incident began when the
Queen’s Committee for Racial and Ethnic Diversity (QCRED) was speaking to physical education and
commerce students.Continue...

Confronting the ‘other’ on campus

Kimberly Huggins experienced culture shock when she came to Queen’s. Born in Trinidad and raised in the Cayman Islands, the ArtSci ’07 student and the African Caribbean Student’s Association (ACSA)president, said she wanted to come to Queen’s because it was something different. It wasn’t what she expected, however.Continue...

Low voter turn-out at fall referendum

Less than 12 per cent of undergraduate students voted Nov. 7 and 8 in the fall referendum. AMS chief returning officer Ilana Ludwin said at least seven voting hours were lost Tuesday due to a campus power outage.Continue...

George Hood to retire

Vice-Principal (Advancement) George Hood, who has raised more than $300 million for the University, will retire at the end of December.

“I’ve always had this date in mind,” Hood said. “I decided that this was great timing.”Continue...

Analyzing Afghanistan

Although some Canadians may disagree with sending troops to Afghanistan, the country’s ambassador to Canada said people need to understand the situation better so they can have a concrete idea with educated solutions.Continue...

Getting the skinny on stress

You’re just over the panic mode that was mid-terms when you realize you’ve got three research papers and a lab to write and weeks of readings to catch up on. Add to that the time commitment of extra-curriculars and social events, and you realize that time is going to be a bit tight for the next few weeks.

Chances are, just thinking about tackling the long to-do list ahead stresses you out.

But what, exactly, does that mean? What is stress?Continue...

History where it happened

Every French town, village and city has a monument listing the names of the men and women who left for war and never came back. The collective memory is palpable.

Thanksgiving weekend, I traveled to Bayeux, a town on France’s northwest coast, with Mandy Doering, another Canadian I met during the first week of my exchange. Our plan was to tour the D-Day beaches; however, because we neglected to plan ahead, all the tours were either full or too expensive.

So our plan changed. We rented bicycles from our hostel and headed to Juno Beach, where the Canadians landed on June 6, 1944.Continue...

Maclean’s results are in

The decision by 22 Canadian universities to opt out of the Maclean’s university ranking survey didn’t hurt the rankings said Tony Keller, managing editor of special projects.

“I think the fundamental goal was to try to put Maclean’s out of business, and they didn’t succeed,” he said. Queen’s was rated second in this year’s medical-doctoral category.Continue...

Going the distance Step by Step

George Marcello has come a long way to talk about organ donations.

The two-time liver recipient and founder of Step by Step, a group founded to increase awareness about organ and tissue donations in Canada, walked from Toronto to Kingston to raise awareness about organ donations. He walked into the JDUC at 12:30 p.m. on Tuesday. “I know what it’s like going through this. It’s a very desperate time and situation,” Marcello said.Continue...

Meet your mayoral candidates

After being involved in municipal politics for 15 years—nine years as a city councillor and six as a school board trustee—Rick Downes was faced with a difficult decision: would he retire from political life
or aim higher and run for mayor? “I thought quite seriously about it, and I guess … the responsible thing would be to let the people decide that in elections,” the 48-year-old said.Continue...

Royal history in one of Kingston’s nooks

I sip my beer slowly—domestic cream ale, which is somewhat fitting to the tavern’s homey atmosphere—and look around the empty premise. Halloween decorations aside, the tavern is laden with little pieces of history that you might miss if you’re not careful.Continue...

Food and athletics remain Achilles heel

Queen’s earned As and A+s for academic reputation, libraries, diversity of extra-curricular experiences, quality of education and student satisfaction, and A-’s for quality of student services and quality of teaching, in the Globe and Mail’s fifth annual University Report Card.Continue...

Meet your city council candidates

Nathaniel Erskine-Smith wants to be making the decisions, rather than having them made for him. After the ArtSci ’07 faced bureaucratic challenges trying to start a gourmet panini business this summer, he decided to run for city council. Since then, Erskine-Smith said he has become aware of other issues that reaffirmed his decision to run.Continue...

Anti-war march lacks student presence

On a rainy Saturday, about 100 anti-war protesters marched from Queen’s campus through downtown Kingston to express their disapproval of Canada’s involvement in Afghanistan, an hour after the CFB Kingston garrison marched to City Hall to show support for Canadian troops.

The City of Kingston organized a Freedom of the City ceremony to show appreciation of and support for Canadian troops and their families.Continue...

Ramadan banner set on fire in JDUC arson

When campus security responded to an active fire alarm at the JDUC last week, they found that property had been burnt at three separate locations--one being the Ramadan banner hung outside the Queen’s University Muslim Students Association’s (QUMSA) club space.

On Oct. 23 at 1:09 a.m., campus security received notice of a fire alarm at the JDUC.Continue...

Tindall Field renovation project on schedule

If all goes according to current plans, the University will enlarge Tindall Field to regulation size—about 100 metres--and convert it to artificial turf and add an underground parking to the neighbouring lot this spring.
The field’s location would be moved east to where the parking lot now lies, and the parking lot would be rebuilt on the field’s old site.Continue...

Lives of ‘misery, sadness and terror’

Close your eyes and imagine the place you call home surrounded by austere brick walls and windows covered with iron bars. You’re cut off from contact with even your closest family members and forced to subsist in a cell barely big enough to hold a single bed.Continue...

JDUC second floor gets diversity makeover

The JDUC’s second floor is getting a makeover, with a new wheelchair accessible washroom, a religious ablution space and renovations to the Robert Sutherland room.

JDUC Director Bob Burge said the JDUC council has wanted to renovate the space for a while, but it wasn’t until August that it obtained the funds from the University to do so.Continue...

Young engineers get WISE on applied science

Sarah Fleming, Sci ’09 and Registration Co-ordinator for Women in Science and Engineering’s (WISE) Engineering and Science Day, said she experienced WISE’s impact first-hand “I’m from Kingston, so I did this when I was younger,” said. “It’s important to get girls to know what’s out there and become familiar with the options in engineering. It’s about more than math and building bridges.” More than 120 girls aged eight to 11 piled into Beamish Munro Hall this past Saturday to participate in a variety of activities geared toward encouraging a love of engineering and science at the Engineering and Science Day, organized by Women in Science and Engineering (W.I.S.E.).Continue...

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