Archive

Province sets tuition hikes in motion

In a long-awaited tuition framework announcement, the provincial government unveiled plans on Wednesday for Ontario university and college tuition following a two-year freeze.

The government announced a 4.5 per cent cap per year on first-year tuition increases for Arts and Science students, a four per cent cap on tuition increases for upper-year Arts and Science students, an eight per cent cap per year on tuition increases for first-year professional school students, and a four per cent increase for upper year professional students per year.Continue...

Controlling arms

Chants of “Hitchcock! Hitchcock! Hitchcock!” filled The Grad Club on Monday evening, as Principal Karen Hitchcock sat down, placed her right elbow on the table and prepared to arm wrestle Golden Words editor Jon Thompson, MA ’06. “When I arrived at Queen’s, the first interview I had was with Golden Words ,” Hitchcock said. “It’s now my turn to get even.”Continue...

JRHC acclaims prez

The results are in for the Jean Royce Hall Council (JRHC) elections. All candidates running have been acclaimed.

Elections for 2006-07 positions were held Feb. 1 and 2. Harkness International Hall, Jean Royce Hall and the Graduate Residence are the three residence buildings that make up JRHC.

The JRHC executive consists of one president, with a council of three house presidents. Because all candidates running for office were unopposed, each needed a vote of confidence to be elected.Continue...

‘Miss G_’ wants women’s studies in high school

If supporters of the Miss G_ Project get their way, Ontario high school students could see a new addition to their academic options as soon as September 2007.
The project was started in February 2005 by a group of students at Huron University College, an affiliate of the University of Western Ontario. It was named after a woman called Miss G_ who in the 1860s and 1870s became a top student above and beyond both her male and female counterparts.Continue...

Exam booklets to stay anonymous

Student leaders favouring the current system of identification only by student number on final examination booklets made their presence known at yesterday’s University Senate meeting, where a motion was put forward to require students to write their names on examination papers.

The motion to suspend the Identification of Students on Final Examinations policy was brought forward by Diane Beauchemin, a faculty senator for Arts and Science and a professor in the chemistry department.Continue...

Union Street project taking shape

If the design presented at the Union Street Project meeting yesterday night is any indication, the future of The Grad Club remains secure.

At the meeting, project director Jeanne Ma introduced the design team from Ottawa-based architects Corush, Sunderland, and Wright.Continue...

Travel CUTS lawsuit settled

A settlement has been reached in the decade-long Travel CUTS lawsuit between the plaintiffs including the AMS and the Canadian Federation of Student-Services (CFS-S).

The settlement will see the ownership of the Canadian Universities Travel Service (Travel CUTS), a travel agency geared toward low-budget and student travel, divided between a newly-formed non-profit corporation and its current owners, the CFS-S.Continue...

Lights, cameras wanted for action on Aberdeen

The Committee for the Safe and Legal Use of Public and Private Space voted yesterday to recommend the provision of surveillance cameras and bright lighting on Aberdeen Street for the duration of Homecoming Weekend 2006. Floyd Patterson, councillor for Sydenham Ward and chair of the committee, said the cameras would be controlled by a person who would have the ability to zoom in on situations and the presence of cameras would be highly publicized.Continue...

Stevens takes SGPS

Last night, Andrew Stevens, a first year PhD student in sociology, was announced as the Society of Graduate and Professional Students (SGPS) president-elect. Stevens is the first SGPS president in three years to be elected, as the past three presidents ran uncontested.

Outgoing SGPS President Dave Thomas said the increase in candidates running this year reflects recent changes within SGPS.Continue...

Slipping and sliding to a resignation

The facts surrounding Louis Plamondon’s resignation as campus activities commissioner are so conflicting, even the commission’s website doesn’t seem to have its story straight.

Plamondon resigned from his post on Feb. 9, but the commission’s website says he is still in charge. The website also says the ice rink on Leonard Field—a lightning rod for the conflicting events surrounding Plamondon’s departure—is “open all winter.”Continue...

Cockroach award ‘one-sided diatribe’

The recipient of the first-ever AMS Golden Cockroach Award has accused the AMS of presenting a “one-sided diatribe” to media about his landlord practices.

Kingston landlord Phil Lam, who was awarded the gold cockroach-shaped trophy at a ceremony Feb. 9 but did not attend to receive it, has responded to what he called a “derogatory” prize with a lengthy letter sent to the AMS and other media sources, including the Journal and the Kingston Whig-Standard .Continue...

QUAKC hosts anti-Coke speakers

With walls covered with posters reading “Ice Cold Killer Coke Can’t Hide Its Crimes in Colombia,” about 40 students and community members gathered in a classroom in Dunning Hall last night to hear a presentation organized by Queen’s University Against Killer Coke (QUAKC). QUAKC partially funded the presentation with some of the $2,000 the group received from the University’s Cold Beverage Exclusivity Fund, as well as funding received from anti-Coke groups at McMaster University, Carleton University and the University of Ottawa.Continue...

Journalist brings reports of Gaza to campus

In 2003, the Toronto-born Jon Elmer spent four months in Jenin, in the West Bank, and six months in the Gaza Strip from June to December 2005. He was there as a freelance journalist, doing print, radio and photography, which has appeared in a range of publications including the Journal for Palestine Studies , The Progressive and The New Standard . He said the experience really allowed him to see the situation “on the ground” in the occupied territories.Continue...

Kennedy, Trevisan elected next Journal editors in chief

Kennedy and Trevisan will face the challenge this summer of moving the newspaper operation out of the Journal House at 272 Earl St., which will be demolished to make way for the Queen’s Centre. While the Journal ’s final home will be in the new student centre’s Media Centre, the newspaper will move into 190 University Ave. in the 10 or more years interim.Continue...

P&CC removes ‘homies’ vending machine

Three and a half years after controversy initially arose over the sale of tiny, plastic “homie” figurines, the dispenser in the P&CC that sold them has been removed.

The toys, which are models of people of a variety of ethnicities wearing urban clothing, were removed early last week due to a customer complaint, said P&CC head manager Andrew Lampard.Continue...

Alternative to Aberdeen still an option

Strong opinions and lively dialogue ensued on Wednesday night in a meeting held between the city, the University and the AMS regarding the possibility of an alternative Homecoming event next year.

Contrary to an article published in yesterday’s Kingston Whig-Standard , AMS Municipal Affairs Commissioner Naomi Lutes said the Committee for the Safe and Legal Use of Public and Private Space hasn’t yet decided against hosting an event that would be an alternative to the unsanctioned Aberdeen Street party next year.Continue...

Airing the sheets on Main Campus

Theft. Impeachment. Election irregularities. Silk flowers.

Over the past four years, it’s words like these that have brought the Main Campus Residents’ Council (MCRC) up on the campus radar. For a student government whose mandate is to make the first-year experience a highlight of a student’s university career, the organization has had its share of lowlights.Continue...

Safety survey results uncover student transportation patterns

Bike lanes are just one solution survey respondents see for the Union and University Street intersections. Seventy-seven per cent of the 1,535 respondents said they want to see bike lanes on University Avenue.

Last September, the University worked in partnership with the City of Kingston to undertake a safety audit of University Avenue and Union Street. The purpose of the audit was to address safety concerns of the two campus thoroughfares.Continue...

Silence speaks volumes for JHR members

The sound of a pin dropping was audible at noon in the Upper Ceilidh of the JDUC on Feb. 8, as 11 members of Queen’s Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) began a 24-hour vow of silence.

“Silence is a symbolic gesture that represents everyone in the world who’s been silenced by human rights abuses,” said Andrew Lee, ArtSci ’06 and co-president of JHR, after the event was over.Continue...

Contest brings home cooking to Leonard

For Erica Stubbs, ArtSci ’09, last Friday, Leonard Dining Hall smelled like home.

The cafeteria was filled with the aroma of homemade curried chicken and sweet potatoes, prepared for students by Erica’s mother, Christina Stubbs, who was ensconced in the international food kiosk wearing an apron proclaiming her as the winner of the “Cooking Countdown.”Continue...

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