Archive

AMS executive and rector statements

The Journal provides this free space for parties on the winter referendum ballot. All statements are unedited.Continue...

Camping in Stauffer brings DREAMs to life

Alvin Shin, Sci ’07, and Joanna Sue, ArtSci ’07, started a 10-day library camp-out called “Mission: Ultimate Stauffer Lockdown” on Jan. 28, complete with a 24-hour webcam. The two are trying to raise money for education in developing countries. They’ve been sleeping nights in separate tents and share a mini-fridge. They’ve also set up a desk that holds computers, a printer and heaps of schoolwork to make up for hours of missed class.Continue...

Three on the ballot for EngSoc election

For three engineers the race is not to the top of the grease pole, but to the presidential seat of the Engineering Society (EngSoc).
Dave Monteith, Devon Stopps and John Connor Langford, all Sci ’07, are vying to be elected the next EngSoc president. Monteith, Stopps and Langford began campaigning Jan. 16.

Monteith said he wants to increase help the Society produce more measurable results.Continue...

Two teams in the running for MCRC executive

Following last year’s controversial two-round election, this year’s MCRC executive candidates are gearing up for another exciting, but hopefully less stressful version.

Team KHL, consisting of presidential candidate Michael Koichopolos, Comm ’09, and VP candidates Chris Henry, Comm ’09, and Dianna Lang, ArtSci ’08, are up against Team YBM, made up of presidential candidate Yusuf Kappaya, ArtSci ’07, and VP candidates Ben Juteau, Sci ’08, and Monica Hwu, ArtSci ’08.Continue...

Chatting with the AMS presidential candidates

Dave Homuth, ArtSci ’06, has been in the Journal hot seat before. This is the second consecutive year he’s run for AMS president, last year placing third with 14.95 per cent of first-place votes. Homuth, a life sciences and economics student who hails from Mississauga, questioned the current AMS executive’s quality of leadership, which has seen the resignation of four senior staff members over the past school year.Continue...

AMS elections nostalgia

In February 1996, the student body made Queen’s history by electing the first black AMS president in what was described as a “landslide” victory.

Earning 45 per cent of the vote, team FLP, comprised of President Greg Frankson, VP (Operations) Chris Lefaivre, and VP (University Affairs) Annette Paul, defeated Team CML (Brent Cameron, Trevor McCaw and Jen Lynch) and Team SHS (Jon Shell, Liz Harvey and Jenn Sisk) who received 24 per cent and 28 per cent of the vote, respectively.Continue...

WaterCan event barely stays afloat

Around 600 students gathered at the Rideau Acres Campground, six miles north of Kingston on Saturday night to attend the club’s largest fundraiser, which raises money for sustainable water systems in developing countries. The bar at the venue was shut down around 1 a.m. after a student was arrested for being intoxicated in a public place.
Chris Dick, manager of the campground, said the student was fighting over a spilled drink.Continue...

Canvin hearing set for Feb. 22

Looking haggard and disoriented and clad in a bright orange jumpsuit, David Canvin appeared in court via video feed Wednesday afternoon to face one charge of first-degree murder.

During the five-minute hearing, the Queen’s professor emeritus conferred briefly with his lawyer and was then remanded pending a bail hearing.

Canvin will continue to be held in the Quinte Detention Centre until his hearing, now set for Feb. 22.Continue...

AMS and rector hopefuls duke it out one last time

Besides Nancy Huynh, VP (Operations) candidate for Team SHT, who was attending a meeting in Toronto, all AMS executive hopefuls were present in the JDUC’s Lower Ceilidh to answer tough questions on Homecoming, AMS employment methods and human rights issues. More than 150 students attended.Continue...

News In Brief

The motion to approve the creation of the new sustainability coordinator for the 2006-07 fiscal year was passed at AMS Assembly last Thursday night.

Jennifer Holub, social issues commissioner, moved the motion and said she was extremely happy about the outcome.Continue...

Campaigning across the ocean: AMS hopefuls woo voters at Herstmonceux

A little piece of the University’s Kingston campus was on TV at the International Study Centre (ISC) in Herstmonceux, England, Sunday afternoon during the second annual transatlantic AMS election teleconference.

The conference provided students with an opportunity to learn more about the candidates for whom they will cast absentee ballots in the upcoming election.Continue...

Students set down priorities for next AMS, rector

With elections just around the corner, Queen’s students are eager to outline exactly what they are looking for in the new rector and AMS executive. The Journal asked various campus organizations, as well as individual students, to describe their ideal AMS executive and rector, from the qualities they should have to the issues they should address. Current AMS president Ethan Rabidoux said accountability was a key issue for the future executive.Continue...

Introducing the VP (Operations) candidates

Mark MacGregor, Sci ’07, wants to ensure forgotten student cards are a thing of the past. He said Team HML wants to reinstate the All-Ages Access (AAA) program on campus, with an added twist.
Underage students would be given a reminder card in place of their student card, and if they left a bar without reclaiming their student card, a light would flash at the StuCon table, MacGregor said.

MacGregor said HML have budgeted the AAA initiative to cost around $2,000.Continue...

AMS elections nostalgia

Back in 1986, Conservative Brian Mulroney was prime minister, Canada was adopting sanctions to protest apartheid policies and the American space shuttle Challenger exploded moments after launching.

Meanwhile, in Kingston, three teams were running for AMS executive, pushing platforms that included more personal involvement between students and the AMS executive, and improvements in student housing and town-gown relations.Continue...

EngSoc invites mayor to campus

At the invitation of the Engineering Society, Mayor Harvey Rosen visited the Integrated Learning Centre and Clark Hall Pub last Thursday.

He was invited to visit in an effort to improve the city’s perception of Queen’s engineering students.
The tour began with a walk to Clark Hall, during which Zabaneh, along with other EngSoc members, discussed with Rosen the many contributions engineering students make in the community.Continue...

Manager puts skin on the line for CFRC

Few people love their jobs as much as CFRC Programming Manager Eric Duncan.

“CFRC has been a part of my life for five years,” he said. “It’s been around almost as long as Queen’s has in my life. It’s outlasted all of my friends and every relationship.”

So Duncan has decided to take his commitment to a new level.

He has promised to tattoo the CFRC logo onto his body if the station’s first funding drive reaches its goal of $5,000.Continue...

Professor emeritus charged with murder

Queen’s professor emeritus David Canvin, 74, has been charged with first-degree murder following the death of his daughter.

At approximately 6 p.m. on Friday, Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) received an emergency call from a residence north of the village of Sydenham, according to an OPP news release.

Police went to the Snug Harbour Resort on Desert Lake, where they discovered the body of 41-year-old Sarah Canvin.Continue...

Talking with VP (University Affairs) hopefuls

Jennifer Raffoul, ArtSci ’06 , is not only passionate about the diversity she sees at Queen’s, she’s part of it.

Raffoul, who’s from Trinidad, comes from a diverse ethnic background—her mother is Canadian and her father’s family is Lebanese. She said living in Trinidad gave her a good idea of what life can be like as a visible minority and how different groups can come together, something she hopes for Queen’s.Continue...

Queen’s rejects police request for funds

The University has officially declined to pay the $84,000 local police requested for their beefed-up presence over Homecoming weekend 2005.

Responding to a request by the Kingston Police Force in October, the University has decided to not pay any of the suggested amount, which police said was to offset the policing costs from Homecoming weekend which included the unsanctioned Aberdeen street party on Sept. 24.Continue...

University receives $5.1 million boost

It wasn’t quite a typical weekday morning at Stauffer Library on Wednesday as Chris Bentley, the Ontario minister of training, colleges and universities, visited the Learning Commons. Bentley arrived on campus to unveil a major cash infusion for Queen’s from the provincial government. From behind a podium near the library’s stairwell, Bentley announced to the small crowd assembled that the McGuinty government will be giving $5.1 million this year to Queen’s in order to enable the University to hire faculty, bolster student services and improve learning facilities.Continue...

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